The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Nothing better to do ;)

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FueledByCoffee's picture
FueledByCoffee

Nothing better to do ;)

I don't know what to do with an entire week without work.  So as crazy as it sounds I bake bread because, well, it's what I love to do.  Playing around a little more with my grapeskin flour fed levain (98% white flour, 2% grapeskin flour).  Didn't add any extra grapeskin flour into the loaf this time and am quite happy with the coloration, it's much more subtle but certainly there. 

Took a pretty relaxed approach, got back home this morning and started an autolyse,  The autolyse started at about 68 percent hydration.  Left, did some errands, visited the folks, let the gluten do it's thing.  Came back 2 hours (?) later, I really am not entirely sure.  Mixed in my levain, salt, and an itty bitty pinch of yeast.  Decided I wanted a little more water so I added some extra.  So by my rough calculations my total hydration should be approximately 83.  Mixed it all up by hand and plopped it in my trust dough trough, gave it two folds, 30 minutes, and an hour 10 minutes.  Let it proof another 1 hour and 15 minutes (little cold up here).  pre shaped, shaped, scored, baked starting at 525, receding to 475 after loading.  Nothing too crazy, nice subtle flavor, great textures, and a happy baker.

DoubleMerlin's picture
DoubleMerlin

And looks like it tastes holy! How do you shape such a high hydration bread? And what strength is the flour? I stay away from those high hydrations because I'm afraid they'll end up more like pancakes than loaves. Obviously that's what you get when you do it right.

Also, what is this grape-skin flour?

FueledByCoffee's picture
FueledByCoffee

The flour is just King Aurthur's bread flour, same stuff anyone can pick up at the grocery store...With loaves at this hydration you just need to have faith.  They will go into the oven looking flat but if you've done you're job they'll get a beautiful spring in the oven and the shape you gave them will return.  Grape skin flour is essentially what it sounds like, from what I understand the skins are dried and then heated to remove any remaining moisture then ground into a flour. Here is a link : http://shop.wholevine.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=1513

I don't really shape them any differently than I would a loaf with less hydration...obviously it take some practice but the techniques are essentially the same.  Next time I'll take some pictures of the shaping process I guess.  Do a nice log pre-shape for the baguette which will help develop strength, make a nice sturdy ball for the boule. Rest for 25 to 30 minutes.  I like resting seem up for this part of the procedure...that way you have flour on the top of your loaf, not inside your loaf and you don't need to over flour your surface for shaping because there is already flour on the part that's going to be against the board...Tighten the boule, put in in a basket.  Baguette shaping like normal, pat it down and work down the loaf, roll it out to size...If you've done your job developing the gluten the dough will still be wet but won't be sticking to everything, a small amount of flour barrier will suffice.  Perhaps next time I can take some picture,  might be a little while, I'm about to get busy again and my home baking time will disappear...

isand66's picture
isand66

Beautiful looking crumb.  Great job with your free time.  Always nice to enjoy it while you can.

BakingBad23's picture
BakingBad23

Why are there is many holes?

BakingBad23's picture
BakingBad23

So*

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

with all of those holes and has to taste great  Well done.