The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hello from FL and Thank you

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havefaith's picture
havefaith

Hello from FL and Thank you

After reading everything I could on this site over the last week, yesterday was the day to bake my first loaf of SD bread. My starter was 9 days old & I was ready to go!  But then I found myself confused  about the different methods and came up against 'stiff' or 'wet' starter?  I read more and asked did I knead too much or too little, the dough was sticky & maybe I should slap and fold? It didn't took like it was rising enough - more reading about 'proofing'- too much too little?  and how should I try to bake - stone, with steam or without, baking sheet, how long. I realized I had read too much trying to take the best ideas and put them all together. I started at 10 am & it is was 8 pm. I decided I had to make some decisions and put the dough in my clay cooker and put it in the refrigerator.  This morning I took it out and realized I wouldn't learn how if I didn't try!  I left the dough alone to warm up and maybe rise. But after 4 hours it hadn't changed much at all.  I soaked the clay cooker lid, set the bottom part with the dough in some water for about 5 minutes, put on the top and put in a cold oven at 475.  After 50 minutes and an extra 5 to brown, my bread was done!  It was stuck and I was prepared to have bread crumbs. But it came loose and while it didn't look like SF SD it smelled pretty good!  My first loaf isn't beautiful, except to me, and I have much to learn but my reward was when I crunched into my first bite. How I've missed my SF SD and now I was tasting that great flavor again.  Thanks for all the help and learning once more there are a lot of ways to reach the end result if you just try!

Ford's picture
Ford

At 9 days old your starter is too young to give you great rising and great flavor.  Keep feeding your baby and it will develop.  It may take a month for this to happen.  Patience on the bakers part is the key to making sour dough.

Ford