The Fresh Loaf

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Why "dock" rye dough? Pictures of it?

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clazar123's picture
clazar123

Why "dock" rye dough? Pictures of it?

When working with a dough, such as a high percentage rye, that has very little gluten, I thought the idea was to trap as much of the gas bubbles as possible and NOT let them escape. Doesn't docking encourage the escape of gas bubbles from the dough?

Anybody have pictures of how they dock and what it looks like? I have found suggestions to "dock" with a fingerpoke and others that say to use a fine object like fork tines or  a knitting needle and everything in between like a chopstick or pencil.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Docking is poking holes in the dough weakening areas as a means to stop large air pockets from forming while baking.  

If a rye dough is docked too late (like scoring with any over-proofed dough) the gasses do escape and a compacted loaf is guaranteed.  The trick is to dock before the dough is over-proofed.  Docking helps prevent "the baker's bedroom" or super large bubbles forming just under the crust where gas can amass and lift off the already set top crust.  

This can happen for a number of reasons and it all has to do with rapid fermentation.  Forgetting the salt in the dough or sloppy folding of the dough can also do this, but docking releases the larger bubbles trapped unevenly in a brittle matrix.  Raising hydration, reducing yeast, adding salt and docking  help the high rye doughs to behave themselves.

I know we have TFL  threads on it and pictures but I can't seem to find them in the archives.  There were even links and pictures of docking tools that looked a little more like medieval torture instruments.  Now when I search docking on the web, I get synonyms for slashing and the hole poking is hard to find unless one mentions pizza or crackers.  

I dock with one wet toothpick, it is long enough.  If not, then my thin probe thermometer works great!  (also can check the dough temp if slow enough)   Dock at least in every square inch or every 3 cm.  I often make a pattern on the loaf.  

this link shows a finished baked loaf with docking marks:

http://www.stirthepots.com/2012/03/henfbrot-hemp-bread.html

I have also seen docking on nut and poppy roll loaves.

good info links in this thread:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/18441/first-100-rye-sourdough-ok-outside-hollow-inside

davidg618's picture
davidg618

...of the loaf's crust is controlled by slashing or docking in all breads that experience oven spring. Mini is right on with her advice: low gluten producing doughs, e.g. high percentage rye loaves, benefit more from docking than slashing to prevent wild surface cracking.

David G

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

And, just to be sure you understand the difference between "docking rye" and "rye scoring," here's an example of "rye scoring:"

Appearance: Glossy crust, but the crust isn't crackly. Remarkably open crumb. 8/10

 

Taste: Firm, tender, chewy crumb with nice, earthy rye flavor and mild sour tang. 9.5/10

 

Final Score: Not half bad. 8.75/10

 

Say, you wouldn't have another slice, would you?

Happy baking!

David

clazar123's picture
clazar123

How adorable! You are starting early on the apprenticeship aren't you? Thank you for the delightful chuckle!

I don't have any perspective on the size of the beautiful rye but I assume it is a larger boule? Is there a general rule that the larger the loaf, the larger the docking holes? And do you plunge the tool all the way to the bottom or just a few inches?

Practice is in my future but until then I am relying on the wisdom of TFL!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I use a chopstick. There are "real" docking tools sold by bakery suppliers. These are rollers with spikes in the shape of truncated cones. I don't know of any guidelines regarding the size of holes. I stick the chopstick in about 2 inches or so. That's probably more than is needed.

I'll be interesting is seeing how others respond.

David

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

it is so typical of rye.  I get suspicious of a rye that doesn't have cracking, it means the rye amount is low.

I give it a 10!     I agree with David, don't have to poke deeper than 2 inches, 1 1/2" would also work.  

suave's picture
suave

It is completely possible to make a high percentage rye with perfectly smooth surface without docking or cracking or anything else of the sort.  But.  Simple it ain't.

suave's picture
suave

When I dock ryes I do it almost entirely for aesthetic reasons so it's hole size and spacing that I care about.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

"Paderborner" - traditional medium rye sourdough from the Paderborn region. The dough rises very slowly, and docking prevents/degasses the aforementioned "baker's bedroom" large gas bubbles under the surface.

I made theses with a wooden spit. But this week I bought a real dough docker, a small roller with spikes in a kitchen supply shop (one can never have enough kitchen gadgets).

Karin

 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

WHEN do you dock a rye loaf? As it is rising or just before putting it in the oven?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I have always docked loaves just before baking.

David

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Yup, just before covering and shoving it into the oven.  Sometimes I wet smear the holes shut again if a smooth surface is desired.  If there is any big bubble lurking (said with a deep dark voice) "down in the depths of my loaf" it finds its way out easily thru the punctured matrix.        

You can see docking holes in this rye loaf, no?

you can see a few docking holes in this loaf, no? 

found the before picture...