The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Chocolate Borodinsky in pieces

varda's picture
varda

Chocolate Borodinsky in pieces

Some time ago I posted on a chocolate borodinsky.  This was scaled to a mammoth 1.4 Kg to fill my 4x4x9 Pullman pan.  That's a lot of Borodinsky particularly since certain people in my domicile eschew high ryes.   (And eschew doesn't mean chew.)   So what do you do if you want a  bit of Borodinsky, or you are baking for other folks who love carbs, but not that many of them.   One cannot piece Borodinsky loaves as you could say a pain de mie.  Paste doesn't piece.   A dilemma.  

The answer?

Cut a piece of parchment paper to width of pan.   Fold in half and fold loose ends to form an upside down T.  Hold vertical in pan at right division point, and then spoon in desired weight of each loaf on either side of parchment.   When pan is full, smooth down each side with wet spatula.   Proof and bake.   As you can see above, this worked.   The division wasn't quite as straight up and down as I had hoped, probably because I didn't get the exact right spot to divide the loaf.    I baked this for 50 minutes, then removed from pan.   The divisions simply fell apart from each other.   No pulling required.   I baked outside of pan for around 10 minutes longer.  

Since this loaf was experimental, I decided to cut the small one right after cooling to see if there was any reason to wait 24 hours or so as I usually do.   (Electric light plus flash.)

The crumb was actually fine - not gummy as I expected.   And the taste was good as well.   I didn't do the scald until the morning for these loaves, but I think its better done night before.

The small loaves are kind of cute.

And I think more satisfying to have a whole small loaf than a cut big one.  

Update:   Here is second loaf crumb- cut after 22 hours (outdoor light)

 

Formula and method

scaled to one 450g (dough weight) and one 700g loaf. 

 

       Small   Medium     Large             Bake small and medium
        
        
Rye Sour - 167% hydration - Whole Rye     
        
Scald       
WR335270 85  
Boiling Water80125169 205  
Molasses132128    
Chocolate Malted Rye121824 30  
Ground coriander123 3  
        
Final Dough       
WR67104141 170  
KABF446994 113  
Water162534 41  
Molasses000 0  
Chocolate Malted Rye000 0  
Malted Rye356 7  
Salt357 8  
Ground coriander000 0  
Rye Sour177276375 454  
Scald139217294 356  
 450700950 1150  
Feed starter to amount night before (must be frothy in the am before using)
Mix up scald and let rest 1 hour 1:008:45 AM 
Mix starter and scald to make sponge  3:309:45 AM 
Mix all then BF  1:151:15 PM 
Put parchment paper in pan as boundary0:102:30 PM 
Spoon in 686g dough into one side0:052:40 PM 
Spoon 444g into the other 0:052:45 PM 
Smooth down each side  2:50 PM 
Proof  1:002:50 PM 
Bake with steam at 450 for 50 minutes0:503:50 PM 
Remove from pan and separate 0:054:40 PM 
Bake 10 more minutes to harden 0:104:45 PM 
Remove and cool   4:55 PM 
      
Total prep time  8:10  

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is my favorite of all the breads you make.  Chocolate rye malt makes this bread so dark you want to eat it like chocolate!  Nicely done.  The tiny loaf is cute and just the right size to eat in one sitting:-)

HaPPY BAKING

varda's picture
varda

But that loaf is almost a pound.  Wouldn't want to eat it in one sitting.   That said, it's almost gone.   Yes happy baking.   Thank you.  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

garden shots too!  No garden can withstand the Summer Sun in Phoenix even thought eh salad veggie are barley hanging on and the tomatoes that get afternoon sun look pretty ragged too.  A little pate maison and the Chocolate Borodinski would disappear toote suite!

varda's picture
varda

I checked in the fridge but alas.   I had this for lunch with smoked salmon and creamcheese.   Truly delicious.   I love gardening but can't grow any veggies because the critters are relentless.  My apprentice tried chasing a bunny today.   It turns out that bunnies run around twice as fast as weimaraners.   Who knew.  

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Nifty work with the parchment. I'd say it might be best to divide tithe pan in three sections and get three of those small loaves which as dabrownman said are the perfect size. I suppose this will improve with age and hold for good week. 

 

Nice baking varda

josh

varda's picture
varda

Hi Josh,  I guess it depends how much bread someone wants.   I think I'm going to do a side by side 700, 700 next.  May be easier to manage the borderline with equal size pieces.    Yes, this bread keeps very well.  And tastes better today than yesterday and so on.   Thanks so much.  -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Varda,

That Chocolate malted rye is quite a bit darker than the Crystal Rye Malt I use.   Makes up a lovely dark loaf, and the bread flour makes it really stand up too.

For what it's worth, I disagree that the soaker is best done the night before.   First off, it's not a soaker, it's a scald; there is a difference.   Actually, I make the Scald, and I combine it with the sour straightaway to make the sponge.   The reason for that is it warms up the sponge and gives it a real kickstart.   It is still far from warm here in the UK; summer seems a long way off.

I'm baking 100% rye loaves all the time now, and, honestly, I cannot make enough.   They always sell out at the markets.

All good wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

Hi Andy,   I got this process from you including the making of the scald the night before.   See here.   I only changed it this time because I was too tired to make the scald the night before.   I found the taste of this bread pretty tart (the coriander?)   so thought maybe it would be more mellow if I had made the scald night before.   Now I think that was because I cut and ate after three hours of cooling, and the flavor does mellow with time.   Glad to hear that you are doing well with your ryes.   No more Borodinskys?  Thank you.  -Varda

varda's picture
varda

Andy,  Edited the post to use correct terminology.   Thanks for catching it.  -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Varda,

Yes, I changed  method as I'm an early morning person, not late night...so it's easier for me to get up and crack on with the full process rather than feeling tired at night making unforseen errors.   Then I realised that the result of a warmer sponge was so beneficial.

Yes, I think the flavour of these breads straight out of the oven is not how they end up tasting once cooled and settled.   Smaller loaves cool quicker, of course, hence why you could cut into the smaller portion without finding the crumb structure in any way gummy.

I really should have checked my old procedures first, shouldn't I?

All good wishes

Andy

evonlim's picture
evonlim

the color of the crumb just beautiful dark and chocolaty. did you make your own malted rye? 

very nice loaf

evon

varda's picture
varda

Hi Evon,   I love the color too, although I guess some people might be disappointed that it isn't actually chocolate.   I got both chocolate and caramel rye malt at a brewer supply.   Better them than me doing the sprouting.   But I'm sure you could do it.   I think it's just a matter of how long you roast it.   Thanks for commenting.  -Varda

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Varda,

Nice loaf. This is one of the ryes that is the favorite for some of the people for whom I bake.  I love the aroma as it bakes.  Directions look complicated but it is actually quite easy to do.  Measure and pour and stir :) 

I use  small loaf pans that KA used to sell but now I don't see them there so my link is to Amazon....I bought these thinking I wouldn't get much use out of them but find I use them a lot since I bake for quite a lot of people who live alone or when there are only 2 people who eat bread...In fact it is my son's favorite size of loaf for sandwiches.

Thanks for the post and photos.

Take Care,

Janet

 

varda's picture
varda

Janet,  I agree.  Very easy.   No shaping or slashing.   Not much by way of mixing.   Just mix (and then mix and then mix and so on.)   Great to hear your son likes this but what's not to like?   Such flavorful bread.  Thanks for commenting.  -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

Great looking loaves as always Varda.  I keep saying I'm going to try one of these styles of bakes but have yet to take the plunge.  I have to order some malt first and then into the deep dark waters I shall plunge!

Regards,
Ian

varda's picture
varda

Hey Ian,  I like this bread for a change of pace as it is so different than anything else I make.  Try it - you'll like it.   I added a few garden pictures above.   Thanks for commenting. -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

Will definitely try.

On the way to visit Mary Tyler Moore for the rest of the week.

regards

Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Such an attractive and authentic looking borodinsky Rye, Varda. Very clever of you too to use parchment sheet for dough separation, I like the idea so much. The crumb is perfect for such a recipe, you nailed it!  Well done :)

It seems like this garden/ scenery thing is contagious, I might as well post a picture of the deserted landscape ( except ofcourse towers of concrete) lying outside my appartment ;)

-Khalid

varda's picture
varda

Thank you Khalid.   I'm glad the parchment paper worked out, as I really needed to figure this out.   I was happy with how the loaf turned out although adjustments always come to mind.   As for the plants, It's just the excitement of things growing again after the long winter.    And anytime you would like to point your camera out the window I'm sure lots of people on TFL would be interested to see what's out there!  -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

I have nothing agains seeing some nice dunes....you know my last name isn't Sandman for nothing :).

Mebake's picture
Mebake

No dunes, Ian... only patches of sand :) I'm not living far inland, the city is at the coast.

-Khalid

Lavanyashah's picture
Lavanyashah

This loaf looks amazing.  If I buy crushed rye malt and chocolate rye malt from a brewing supplier, can I just use it directly or do I need to do something else before using it to make this bread?  Thank you.  Lavanya

varda's picture
varda

Hi Lavanya,   I bought rye malt which had not been ground, so I mill it in a coffee grinder before using it in the bake.   If you can buy something already milled then just put it right in.   Hope you try this.  -Varda

Lavanyashah's picture
Lavanyashah

Thank you.  I found a brewery supplier that sells it either whole or ground.  If you think it is better to grind fresh, I could do that also.  Lavanya

varda's picture
varda

to get it whole.   I just finished a bag of chocolate rye malt that I've had for a year, just grinding a bit at a time.   Might get musty if it were sitting around ground for that whole time.   -Varda

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Varda.  This bread has so many interesting ingredients I would never think to combine in bread, yet the crumb looks very familiar.  Very nice.  Isn't it like a girl to find a way to squeeze some chocolate in a bread? :)  Uh oh, I meant that in the kindest way!  Please, no backlash for that comment!

Thank you for the creativity.

John

varda's picture
varda

Oh must be in the other jacket.   Lucky for you John.    Anyhoo...   The only innovation of mine is using chocolate rye malt instead of some other rye malt.   Andy is the one who brought this magnificent bread in full form, Auerman process and all, to TFL.  I'm not sure if he still makes it having moved on to Moscow Rye, but I've been making it for friends and friends of friends, and it's much beloved by people who had never heard of such a thing, or tasted anything remotely similar.   That makes me happy.   Onward and upward.   Thanks John.  -Varda