The Fresh Loaf

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New multigrain bread recipe... double check me?

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BNLeuck's picture
BNLeuck

New multigrain bread recipe... double check me?

I'm too lazy to search for a recipe among the myriad thousands out there for one that most closely resembles what I want, but apparently not too lazy to work on my baker's percentages. Weird, I know, but I'm a weird person. Will those with some knowledge of sandwich breads and baker's percentages please look this over to make sure I haven't made some glaring error? I haven't worked with BPs in a long while, or done any more complicated a bread recipe than a standard white rustic loaf in over a year without pulling it straight from a book, so I could have gone horribly wrong somewhere.

 

Revised:
TWO 8.5x4in LOAVES
*************************
bread flour 50%
rye flour 40%
rolled oats 10%
FLOUR WEIGHT: 100% 700g

nonfat dry milk 5% 35g
molasses 5% 35g
honey 5% 35g
butter 5% 35g
ground flax 2% 14g
salt 2% 14g
yeast 2% 14g
ADDITIONALS WEIGHT: 26% 182g

water 70% 490g
HYDRATION

TOTAL WEIGHT: 1372g

 

TWO 9x5in LOAVES
*************************
bread flour 50%
rye flour 40%
rolled oats 10%
FLOUR WEIGHT: 100% 910g

nonfat dry milk 5% 45g
molasses 5% 45g
honey 5% 45g
butter 5% 45g
ground flax 2% 18g
salt 2% 18g
yeast 2% 18g
ADDITIONALS WEIGHT: 26% 234g

water 70% 637g
HYDRATION

TOTAL WEIGHT: 1781g

 

My plan runs somewhat along the lines of KAF's oatmeal sandwich bread, using hot water to soften the oats, incorporate the stickies (honey and molasses), the butter, and the salt. Once lukewarm I'd add the NF dry milk, as it does not mix in well when the water is hot. The flours, flax, and yeast (I use instant) will be combined. But here is where I wonder... should I mix the remaining water with the dry mix to develop some gluten before adding in the enrichment elements, or incorporate the oat mix first? At 65% (now 70%) hydration, I don't worry about over hydrating, so I'd use all the reserved water. Or does it really matter? I have had trouble in the past developing gluten in enriched doughs, which is why I ask. Any and all thoughts on the proposed recipe are welcome!

EDIT: Taken from comments below, I have corrected my typo (oops!), will autolyse, and upped the hydration. I am baking a test batch to see if this works out like I see in my head, and will update this post accordingly. Now, just to find the time to do so... hmm...

kenlklaser's picture
kenlklaser

ground flax at 2% of 910 g should be the same weight as salt @ 2%.  I would make sure to autolyze the flour.

BNLeuck's picture
BNLeuck

Haha, I forgot to change that value when I scaled the BPs for 9x5s, didn't I? Thanks for the catch!

Autolyze is a good idea I hadn't considered. So, the water not used to soak the oats will be used in an autolyze... at that point, base gluten built, would futher development be necessary and/or decidedly helpful, or just optional? Hmmm...

kenlklaser's picture
kenlklaser

When I mix in fat to wheat dough, I do it after the autolyze. It's a bit tricky to do in that order, I use a high-speed food processor with the metal blade. After that step, I add other ingredients, but not using the same mixing tool, it creates a rather lot of heat. Mixing everything else so it is evenly distributed throughout the dough takes a bit more mixing time. You'll know it if you didn't mix the final dough sufficiently, you'll end up with streaks of ingredients in your crumb.

I'm not familiar with some of the ingredients, pretty sure I saw Mini Oven say that flax would require extra water. Pretty sure the rye takes extra water as well. Maybe someone else will comment.

BNLeuck's picture
BNLeuck

Perhaps a hydration of 70% for the benefit of the rye and flax, then? I seem to recall reading that rye takes more liquid as well, some time ago. Perhaps I'm mistaken but it does sound familiar. Never heard it about flax, but I'll look in to that too. Thanks for the tips!