The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Oatmeal Stout Bread

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golgi70's picture
golgi70

Oatmeal Stout Bread

Been working on this for some time on and off.  Back at the on the past couple weeks and I think we have a winner.

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Crumb shots when cool

plevee's picture
plevee

Gorgeous!

Alpana's picture
Alpana

Great looking bread.  The crumb is bound to match it.

golgi70's picture
golgi70

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Not quite as open as I'd like.  So Oatmeal Stout is a fun name as this bread is made with an assertive (and delicious) stout and toasted rolled oats soaked in the stout.  hence oatmeal stout.  Maybe a touch underproofed.  I'll try again and get a better proof before I make any change.  If needed I may add a touch more hydration.  Tastes nutty and delicous.  Think I'll makes some small rolls and have beer brats on beer bread with some local kraut.  

 

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Considering the rolled oats in the dough, I'd say that's a very open crumb.  And it has to taste good!

Paul

golgi70's picture
golgi70

This is the first bread I've made with oats in it and it seems to have quite an impact on the dough although they dissappear to the eye after all is said and done.  Ya think the oats add to the softness of the loaf or is that the sugars in the stout?

 

Josh

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Yes, I think that they do contribute to the softness, since they contribute nothing (effectively) to the gluten content.  And they are very effective at soaking up moisture, which also contributes to crumb softness.  Those can contribute to eating pleasure but not so much to structure.

Having seen your formula now, the oats are a very small percentage of the final dough.  Their impact may be less than I anticipated from your initial post, as a result.  The oat-containing breads that I have made have generally been hefty, rather than airy.  You made a good choice to presoak them, allowing them to be fully hydrated before mixing instead of wicking moisture away from the dough.

I don't know how much residual sugar there is in stout, so really can't comment about that.  It certainly contributes to color, flavor, and aroma of the bread.

Paul

isand66's picture
isand66

Very nice...please share your formula.

golgi70's picture
golgi70

sorry it took so long.  busy working.  just broke down the recipe for a small home batch.  Cant wait to see your results

 

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of the great breads.  Anyone wou'd be pleased to buy your examples for $5 a loaf and think they got a bargain - and they would have:-)

Nice baking!

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Thanks for the compliments.  Most breads I've had with beer you can't taste the beer which bothers me.  I want to taste the beer.  I chose a semi assertive stout to hopefully push that through.  It worked.  I did the bulk of  the bake floor proofing but had a couple extra loaves that wouldn't fit so i retarded them right after I shaped.  Perfectly proofed and made an even nicer crust and the crumb opened a bit more;  I think that is the way I'll go from here.  Hazelnuts might be nice too.  

 

Happy Baking

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

So before I add the formula I am not considering the Oats as a soaker just as an add in although I'm sure it is soaking up some fo the hydration.  Another note which may hold absolutely no ground.  I don't like the idea of using flat beer.  The beer of choice for me I cannot find at room temp.  I use it fresh and balance the temp with warm water.  The amount of beer to water is almost 50/50 so I temp the cold beer and figure out what water temp I want and get the avergae between the 2.  ex.  if the beer is 47(-23 of desired temp0 degrees and I want 70 degree water I use 93(+23 degrees of desired temp) degree water and end up very close to 70.  If you use beer at room temp then ignore the warm water. 

For 2 loaves 

4 oz                 (mature 100% white starter)

22.25 oz          Strong White Flour

5.75 oz             Red Winter Wheat, freshly milled if possible)

2.25 oz            Rye (freshly milled if possible)

2.5 oz              Rolled Oates, toasted

11.25 oz           H20 #1, warmed to balance the cold beer if necessary

9.5 oz               Stout Beer 

.7 oz                 Sea Salt

.15 oz               Instant Yeast

1.25 oz             H20 #2 for the bassinage (thanks to someone who on here who named this technique)

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This recipe is about 75% hydration not including the soaker and you could probably push it a bit if you'd like. 

1)  Add toasted oats to the stout 30 minutes before you want to start your mix.  

2)  Autolyse beer/oat mix, h20#1, and flours for 30-60 minutes

3)  Mix in your mature starter.  Now add the yeas until incorporated.  Now the salt. 

4)  Once the dough has come together turn it up to medium speed and develop slightly.  (medium development)

5)  Add h20#2 and mix on low until dough comes back together. turn to speed 2 for a minute or so and place in a greased tub. 

6)  3 stretch and folds at 20 minute intervals.  Rest 1 1/2 hours.  Divde in half and round.  Let rest 15 minutes.

7)  Shape as a batard, roll tops on wet towel and then into rolled oats.  Place in oval banneton seam side up. 

8)  Proof covered for 1 1/2 to 2 hours.  Bake on stone with steam at 450 for 15 minutes then vented at 425 for 15-20 more.  Internal temp of (202-204).  That is how the loaves in the picture were baked.  

Alternitavely you can retard the loaves right after shaping covering lightly with plastic wrap overnight and bake in the same manner directly from the retarder.  I thought the crumb and crust improved from the retarding yet the floor proofed loaves were excellent as well.  

Happy Baking

 

Josh

 

 

varda's picture
varda

Josh, These breads look fantastic.   I have been following various bakes with beer, etc. but haven't gone there.   If I do I'll try this one.   It really looks great.   -Varda