The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

delayed rising

kathym's picture
kathym

delayed rising

I have read that bread ofted developes a more complex taste by using a slower rise. While making Italian bread today, I had to leave and was unable to complete the second rise. The dough is now in the "fridge." My question is: do I bring the dough up to room temperature then shape the loaves?

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I say stick with the "let rise until doubled in size" rule. Depending on how active it was going into the fridge and how cold your fridge is you may find it still doubled in size in there. If not, pull it out and let it warm until it does (which may take a couple of hours) and then shape it.

I hope it turns out for you!

SourdoLady's picture
SourdoLady

How did the bread turn out? Since no one answered your post yesterday, I'm assuming you baked it already.

You can bring the dough to room temp and then shape, or you can shape while cold and then let it proof. Either way the end result is the same. I usually pat my chilled dough out into a large, flat disc shape and let it come to room temp before shaping. I find that by doing it this way it takes less time to warm the dough up.

kathym's picture
kathym

Thank you for asking. The bread came out fine, in fact my daughter liked it better than the last batch of Italian bread of the same recipe! I left it at room temp. for about one hour then shaped the loaves, allowed them to rise only a short while then baked on a stone at 450. The bread did not rise as well in the final rising, I thought possibly the yeast "needed more food"? The bread was a little denser but had more flavor possibly "sour doughy" Anyway we ate almost all of it!

carltonb's picture
carltonb

How do you think that 90% of the bakeries in the US are able to get bread to the consumer so quickly in the AM.

For example On Friday I had orders for over 300lbs of bread products. almost 200 lbs of dough was made and the products were formed.This was done Thur afternoon between 12 and 3, and put in a retarder (refrigerator) until 5am on Friday. The bread was pulled out of the retarder, proofed or processed as needed, then baked.

Using this method requires some forthought and planning. First, you might want to slightly increase the yeast, some will die in the process, Also make sure the formed products are covered and do not dry out. Also make sure your refrigerator is between 34 and 38°F. This will guarantee minimal dough action.

What you are doing is a very common technique, made easier by many of the dry yeasts that area available. For other production like danish, sweetrolls and croissants, there is a yeast designed for rich dough products, or products you are going to freeze. I will make 5 to 8 20lb slabs of danish dough once a week. They are then put in the freezer and pulled as needed the day before production. The same with the other doughs.

Hope that this helps.

Carlton Brooks CEPC, CCE
Mesa, Arizona

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Thank you for providing the professional perspective on both this and the croissant question someone posted a few weeks ago, Carlton. It is extremely helpful to us to hear how the pros do it, and you have been very gracious in spending some of your time helping out those of us just getting started. It is much appreciated.