The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

buttermilk bread

qahtan's picture
qahtan

buttermilk bread

Please don't ask me for the recipe...I was interupted and that threw every thing out of wack.. 

 I had 2 cups warm milk,
       2 cups water
       1 rounded table spoon of sugar
       1 good ounce fresh yeast crumpled
       4 cups flour
       Then after  this was mixed I added 3 heaping tablespoons dry butter milk, about 1/2 cup soft butter, mixed that well and added 1 1/2 teaspoons salt, and enough flour togive me a nice dough..  It's the amount of flour that I put in I am not sure of... ;-))) qahtan

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Really really nice.                                                               weavershouse

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 

 I see these are two of your interests, do you spin or weave, I have 2 Ashford wheels, and 2 Leclerc looms,  36 and 42, both counterbalanced. Plus 1 tapestry loom, don't  do any of it now, not so much don't but can't. :-((( qahtan

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Hi fellow spinner, weaver. I still have my old spinning wheels but they're getting dusty. I weave some but not nearly as much as I did. Still try to keep something on the loom. I have a 40" Glimakra Loom. If we want to talk more about this I can start a thread in my blog. We must have similar interests, textile arts and breadbaking. Your breads are always a treat to see.                                                          weavershouse

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

This could be a common theme. I am a very amateuer spinner.

I've a second hand ahsford wheel and I havent spun in a while because things like bread and family have taken over my time....I hope to get back to it sooner rather than later...

 

Just thought I'd put my hand up and say "Hi...Me too!"

 

 

susanfnp's picture
susanfnp

Definitely a common theme here. I used to make my living (well, I guess it's really a stretch to call it that) as a weaver. Alas, my loom (also a LeClerc) has not seen any action in quite some time, but I still have it for someday.

Susanfnp

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Maybe there are more of us. I used to think it would be great to have a small business called BREADS AND THREADS. A little divided place, good bread on one side and handspun/handwovens on the other side. Dreaming is more fun than doing. I prefer weaving for my own use or for gifts rather than as a job as I did for a while. There are so many metaphors for both bread and weaving and life. It's how I learn. Thanks for saying "Hi".                                                                                    weavershouse

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Qahtan,

I always so enjoy your posts. You have a certain confidence in your words and the images to make a grown man drool. Very nice work indeed!

I am wondering about the dried buttermilk. I don't recall ever seeing that in a store. Also were all the loaves in the image made from that one batch? I see 8 loaves so that would be maybe 3500g of flour total approximately, just roughly? 7.7 Lbs maybe.

One other thing. What's with the double loaf pan? Can you show us how that works please?

Thank you for sharing.

Eric

browndog's picture
browndog

Eric, I for one can get dried buttermilk powder in bulk at the local food co-ops, in fact it's usually a dollar or two cheaper per pound than the regular.

kjknits's picture
kjknits

I have seen it at the grocery store under this label.  I believe I bought some once, but I don't remember what I did with it!

Katie in SC 

kjknits's picture
kjknits

Qahtan, love the bread!  I, too, would love to hear about the kind of pans you used.

Katie in SC 

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 Thanks every one for your compliments,,,,,

 I will try and take a photo of my pans later  and post them,,,, ;-))) qahtan

qahtan's picture
qahtan

Hi,,  As there is only the two of us now we don't go through the bread so quickly.   So I thought I would try reducing the size.   Picture of pans used for my butter milk bread, the large pan is a pullman used with out the lid. The pullman with lid I use 32 ounces dough, without the lid I used 40 ounces 4 at 10 each as I wanted it to rise above the rim of the pan. The smaller pan is what I usually use for loaf bread, I use 20 ounces of dough in them,  this time I used it as 2 at 10 ounces. Those pans are really pans that were at one time used for head cheese( a jellied meat) So with that I knew they were food safe, The man in the deli saved them for me and gave me a whole load.  They always go in the dishwasher.   I made the dough let it rise etc, and cut it into 10 ounces pieces, shaped as large round rolls and put 2 each the small pan 4 into the large,. By doing it this way I can wrap and freeze, then I can break off a loaf at will, better than having a larger loaf to go stale before it is finished. Yes this was all mixed as one batch in my D L X mixer, 8 at 10 ounces each = 80 ounces = 5 lb. I did have a enough over to make one small roll. which we had half each last night, yes we both liked it.  The other picture is butter milk powder.qahtan

kjknits's picture
kjknits

Thanks for posting the photos!  I thought you might have made more than one loaf per pan in the way you described.  I think it's a great idea!  And it makes pretty loaves.

I handle it a different way (but with similar goals, because I bake 4 loaves at once and we also can't eat it all before it goes stale).  I slice our sandwich bread after cooling, the pop the whole loaf (in a bag) into the freezer.  Then when we want bread, we pop off as many slices as needed.  They come apart easily, even though frozen. We usually let the slices sit on the plate for a few minutes to defrost, but if we're in a hurry we just nuke them for a few seconds on low power.

Either way, no bread goes stale! =) 

Katie in SC 

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 

 I think it would be nice if we could chat if wanted to about spinning and weaving, though as I said I can't do either now, but still have an interest in it. qahtan 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I'm feeling a little dense today so bear with me please. In the image of your finished breads, what am I seeing? It looks to me to be a side view of the smaller size pan with two balls of dough that were baked together. Is that right? But they look so deep, I'm not sure I have it yet.

Eric (blockhead)

 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

For anyone else that didn't know about dry buttermilk, I discovered that SACO products just down the road from our house in Middleton WI makes this product and sells it all over the place. Who knew? Maybe I should spend more time in health food stores and less in KFC!

Eric

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 

 The pictures of the loaves of bread are showing side view.  the depth  is just right for sandwich or toast.

     ;-))) qahtan 

zolablue's picture
zolablue

Yours are beautiful loaves.  I wonder how one would substitute using liquid buttermilk.  Other than adjusting the hydration would it taste the same?

I've never purchased that dried buttermilk but it sure would be a great way to always have buttermilk on hand.  Eric, I was going to mention that if you check most groceries actually have this in the baking aisle.  I never realized it either until I made a point to look for it so I'll bet you can find it elsewhere, too.

And, Eric, I had remembered seeing these taller French baking pans so thought you might be interested:

http://www.chefscatalog.com/catalog/product.aspx?scommand=search&search=loaf%2bpan&sourcecode=7W4GG4008&SiteID=1365653&item=21741

qahtan's picture
qahtan

I do use fresh butter milk instead of water, as I expect if you have noticed any of my posts about baking, I really do what I think would be best,,,,,, and jiggle with my own recipe, unless it is for some thing special.  Sometimes I swap water for ale or Guinness. I  some how can't get this hydration  or bakers formulas.:-))))

Glory says: I serve this bread with a variety of cheese on a cheese board. At the moment I have Ontario 5 year old cheddar, UK Red Leicester, British Farmhouse, two German cheeses, Cambozola, a Brie with blue, and Montagnola. It would indeed make a lovely sandwich, plain or grilled.

GUINNESS WALNUT BREAD

1 cup Guinness or dark ale, just warm
1/2 cup less 1 tablespoon walnut oil
1 1/2 cups strong white flour
1 1/2 cup strong whole wheat flour, home ground hard wheat kernels
1 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons yeast
1 cup toasted loosely chopped walnuts
1/4 cup toasted loosely chopped walnuts

Make a dough in food processor with all but walnuts. You may have to add a little more flour or a splash of water to get right texture. Change blade to plastic one, add 1 cup of walnuts and buzz just enough to blend in nuts. Proof, shape, rise, paint top with a little egg white and water mixed well, sprinkle with 1/4 cup walnuts. Bake  35/40 minutes at 380º.

YIELD: 1 loaf

browndog's picture
browndog

well, now I know what the next bread I bake is going to be.