The Fresh Loaf

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Rye Sourdough with Spelt and soaker

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Mebake's picture
Mebake

Rye Sourdough with Spelt and soaker

Last week, I had some left over whole spelt flour, some corn meal, and some semolina in addition to a ripe Rye starter. Therefore, I decided to put them all to use in a new recipe as follows:

UPDATE** INSTRUCTIONS:

Prepare the Rye sour by adding a tablespoon and a half of your active rye starter to the 250g water, and mix well to disperse. Add the Whole rye flour, mix well, and let stand for 8-12 hours at room temperature until the surface just starts to crack and collapse. To prepare the soaker, weigh all soaker ingredients into a bowl, and then weigh 160 grm of water, boil it, and add it to the soaker. Mix well, cover, and let stand until overnight, or when your rye sour is ready.

Next day, mix all ingredients at once, by hand or using a mixer for 5-10 minutes. The dough will remain relatively sticky, so try to resist adding any flour at this stage.Shape as a round and let ferment in an oiled bowl for 2 hours at preferably 78 F or 24-25C, folding it half way through at the 1 hour mark. By the end of bulk fermentation, the dough will have risen by 50-60%. scrape your dough onto a heavily floured surface, pat the dough even (Don't knead), divide into the desired dough pieces, and round each piece leaving them to rest for 15- 20 min, covered. Dust your basket with a mixture of all purpose flour and rice flour, and shape your dough and invert it smooth side down into the basket. The final fermentation will be only 45 minutes, but watch the dough NOT the clock. Preheat your oven at this stage with a stone in place to a 500F or 260C. 5 minutes before loading the bread, place your steaming dish filled with wet towels on the bottom of your oven.  When ready, invert the dough on baking paper lined peel/ board and close the oven immediately. Bake for 15 minutes with steam, and then remove the steaming dish and reduce the temperature to 400F for another 20-25 minutes. 

When the time is over, remove your bread from the oven. Wear oven mitts, and tap on the bottom of one loaf, It should  sound hollow. Furthermore, you may insert a thermal probe into the center of the loaf from the bottom, and the temperature should register 195-200F or 90-95C. If it doesn't, put it back in the oven for another 10 minutes. Cool the bread completely on a wire rack, prior to cutting. 

 

 

Due to the soaker, the aroma of this bread is really attractive. When cool, The crust was somewhat chewy, and the crumb slightly moist but not chewy. The flavor of this bread is earthy sweet and very pleasant. The crumb is close textured and compact due to all the whole grains, the bread might have benefited from extra lightness by increasing bread/all purpose flour.

I have eaten this bread thinly sliced with a spread of cheese, and it was fabulous. This bread keeps really well.

 

- Khalid

 

Comments

robi's picture
robi

Hi everyone, just signed up on the page and have to show you my result of making this bread, I baked it in DO becouse dont have a baking stone and did a mix of rye and bread flour,again becouse I dont have spelt flour :) , it turned out beautiful and really tasty(guess the most of the taste came from the soaker) I would just like to say thanks to everyone who is shering they skills and knowledge and your passion to us, and thank you Mebake for sharing this recipe with us! so here are my loafs

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I'm sorry for the belated reply. 

Yum! those are beautiful loaves, Robi. From the crust and crumb, it looks like you've done the right job. From the photo of the crumb, it appears like you've used medium Rye flour. Which part of the world do you live in?

best wishes,

Khalid

 

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Khalid:  If you were going to use a different flour than Semolina in this recipe (I may not have any), what would it be? I know have a lot of Amaranth flour....what do you think?   Or perhaps you have another Amaranth recipe to recommend?  Lovely loaves...thanks for sharing.  Phyllis

p.s.  another question....if you could add anything else to the soaker, what would it be?  Double thanks!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hi, Phyllis and thanks!

i haven't used amarnath in my baking, sorry. Semolina is from durum wheat, and may be coarsely ground  Kamut (which somewhat resembles Durum wheat) can be used instead. But, Kamut is hard to come by and is expensive, so it isn't a suitable replacement! 

Looking at the comment below, i think that couscous (which is essentially pre-steamed semolina) would worked well , if you can find it.

If i would add anything to the soaker it would be a tablespoon of barley malt extract (sweet malt syrup).

Thanks,

Khalid

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

I will let you know when I try it!  It looks wonderful.  Thanks again for the advice.  Best,  Phyllis

Eastern Star Geek's picture
Eastern Star Geek

Thank you so much for the lovely recipe.  I have been searching for the Lithuanian Ryebread of my NY childhood, and this recipe comes mighty close!  I modified the recipe somewhat:

Whole Spelt Flour ---> Hard Red Winter Wheat flour, home-milled from whole berries
Rolled Oats ----> Half rolled oats and half Rye flakes
I used cous-cous for the coarse semolina, and a coarse corn meal instead of fine.


I let the pre-ferment sit for about 8 hours.  I use the interior of my electric oven with the 60W bulb burning.  Maintains a perfect 90 deg F.  (Very useful for making yogurt, too!)

I proofed the loaves in stainless steel mixing bowls, then turned them into 9" pre-heated cast-iron skillets to bake.   It was a little tricky to drop the loaf into a hot skillet without deflating it, but it worked out OK.  I use an electric convection oven at an initial bake at 475degF for 15 minutes with steam pan, then finished at 400.

 

 



The result was a dense uniform crumb, very chewy with a nice crust.  Flavor is very similar to what I remember!


Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely looking loaf, eastern star! I'm glad you are pleased with it, and that it reminds you of Lithuanian Rye.

The 90 F proofing temperature of the preferment caught my attention. Ideally, preferment should be kept at cooler temperature for long periods (upto 16 hours at 70 F). If you ferment your levain/sour at warmer temperatures, like you've done,  you'd risk the increase of the reproduction rate of Lacto bacteria which in turn can cause the preferment to be excessively acidic (you don't want that). A healthy combination of lacto bacteria and wild yeasts is important, and it will lead to a better, more open crumb. Don't get me wrong here, a dense crumb could be an attractive feature in whole grain breads, but it can taste just as well and be lighter if you reduced your proofing temperature to 75-80 F max.

Best wishes!

Khalid

Eastern Star Geek's picture
Eastern Star Geek

Khalid,

Many thanks for the tip- I did notice that the crumb was noticeably finer than yours and the other examples.  I thought at first that I did not let the preferment stay long enough, or that I should have used a higher hydration level considering that I exchanged the spelt flour for a home ground hard red winter wheat.  The loaf is certainly springy and chewy, which is how I like it- very sturdy crumb- practically indestructible, in fact- makes it easy to slice thinly.

I remember reading somewhere that extra acid is beneficial for stabilizing Rye starch.  In any case, I didn't think the loaf tasted excessively sour, but I will keep your advice in mind when I seek to bake something with a more open crumb.

Perhaps this was a happy accident, since the Lithuanian Bread I remember does not have an open crumb and a wrinkled crust like yours and the others.  I do remember it being a little bit malty, however, which I did not achieve this time.  I am intrigued about Red Rye Malt, and have some whole Rye berries with which to make it.  That will be a future project.

While we're on the subject of temperature, what is the ideal temperatures for bulk fermentation and proofing?

Many thanks for your encouragement and support.  Happy Baking!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

The ideal temperature for a final dough of Rye is between 80- 85 F. I'd go for 82F (28 C), and the same applies for final proofing.

My pleasure, Eastern star!

Khalid

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

Khalid:  I haven't tasted it yet, but it looks great.  Really enjoyed the process.  I made a few changes that I will list in my blog later when I have the second loaf and crumb shots. Thanks so much for this recipe.  Lots of fun.  Best,  Phyllis

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