The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

our first bread from lessons section

scotty71's picture
scotty71

our first bread from lessons section

 

This is the first raising before we punched it down

 wE MADE A DOUBLE RECIPE  BUT AFTER PUNCHING IT DOWN AND PUTTING IT INTO 2 DIFERENT BREAD PANS I DONT SEE HOW DOUBLING IN SIZE WILL EVEN FILL  the pans.

Any thoughts on this??? :)

 

Excuse my caps-- i goof often.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

It probably won't fill the pans, but when it gets close to doubled in size, pop it in the oven.  It should get a final spring there too, adding another half inch or so.

Good luck!

-Floyd

scotty71's picture
scotty71

If the bread turnes out ok then it will be a  volume calculation i guess--- Thanks :)

scotty71's picture
scotty71

 

 The taste is great. It's not raw any where--The crust is  crunchy and tastes  good.

I was under the impression that there should be larger holes in the bread--

 

 Please comment and advise  me.

loafette's picture
loafette

Congrats on your first success!

Here's a small chart of various pan sizes/amount of dough per pan...using the properly sized pan helps achieve a nicely crowned standard 'sandwich' loaf. The first time I ever made plain ol' bread, I only had a 9x5 pan, and although it turned out/baked up great, I was disappointed in the look...until I found out I needed a 'standard' loaf pan, 8.5x4.5...big difference in appearance...lol!

Per the 'holes'...the crumb depends upon the hydration of the dough, the ratio of liquid/flour weight...a standard sandwich loaf is usually anywhere between 62-65% hydration...the higher hydrations will yield the more open crumb, baguettes/ciabatta, and so on.

For example, if you were working with a recipe calling for 1 cup of water, and 3 cups of flour...:

8/12.75 = 0.627450980392

 

 

Pan sizes - Flour Amounts - Dough Amounts.....

Jumbo - 10x4-1/2-inches - 4-5-cups flour - 2#+ dough

Quick Bread - 9x5 - 4-cups flour - 2# dough

Standard - 8-1/2x4-1/2 - 3-cups flour - 1.5# dough

Medium - 7-1/2x3-1/2 - 2-1/2 c. flour - 1# dough

Small - 5-3/4x3-3/4 - 1-1/2 c. flour - 8 oz. dough

Miniature - 4-1/2x2-1/2 - 3/4 c. flour - 6 oz. dough

You're off to a great start, and it will only get more enjoyable, as you continue!

Laura

scotty71's picture
scotty71

Thanks for the response Laura--

 

i  have to read and study your reply--- are you saying a  bit too much flour or more kneeding ?? i really would appreciate some simpler response at this  moment :)

loafette's picture
loafette

I apologize if I wasn't entirely clear...I was attempting to answer your question about the crumb of the bread. The breads you see with larger holes are made with a higher percentage of liquid, water usually...and most of the time they're what are called 'lean' breads, meaning no enrichments, like fats (butter/oils), eggs, milk, sweeteners. The doughs for the more open crumbed breads are handled somewhat differently, as well...the doughs can be very slack, and sticky. A 'normal' American style bread, a pan loaf, would have a more finely textured crumb, due to both the enrichments, and the kneading technique used. You get a soft, but not slack dough, with maybe a bit of tackiness, but it's not too sticky to work by either hand or machine. 

Perhaps if you tell us which recipe/formula you followed, we could get you closer to what you're hoping for.

Laura

 

 

 

 

scotty71's picture
scotty71

I am very pleased with the bread. It is the first bread recipe in the lessons section

3 cups flour 2 teaspoons salt 2 teaspoons yeast 1 1/8 cup water

 . We added a bit more flour ((about 5 tablespoons)) as it was kneeding because it wasnt pulling away from the sides of the bowl. This bread has very consistant texture with holes throught it- the  holes are the diameter of a wooden toothpick. some smaller and some a  bit larger. Perhaps i mis understood some of the things i read about  holes.  I'm not really hoping for anything but a loaf of properly made  bread whatever that is.  I forgot to add dough enhancer, The recipe did  not call for it  but i read that it would make a lighter bread.