The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Please help me choose between mixers

watto1903's picture
watto1903

Please help me choose between mixers

For my budget it is a straight choice between 

Kenwood Prospero KM283

Or

Tefal QB400DA4

Could anyone advise whether I should pick one over the other? 

Kollin's picture
Kollin

Kenwood Prospero KM283 Capacity - dough :500g

Tefal QB400DA4 - unknown

This capacity for dough does not look good  to me  ;)

watto1903's picture
watto1903

It's a 4.3 litre bowl. Surely that holds more than 500g?

Kollin's picture
Kollin

http://www.kenwoodworld.com/en-INT/All-products/Kitchen-Machines/Prospero/prospero---km283---0wkm283001/?TabSegment=specifications

 

Capacities
  • Bowl size:4.3 litres
  • Capacity - cake :1.6kg
  • Capacity - dough :500g
  • Capacity - egg whites :8 Maximum
  • Capacity - flour for pastry :450g
watto1903's picture
watto1903

The Tefal is 4 litre bowl so i guess it's a similar sort of dough capacity. 

 

Looking at it though I would assume you can mix more than that? 

 

Kollin's picture
Kollin

My advice is: Save  more money and take something decent (that can work 1.5-2kg of dough) .

mini_maggie's picture
mini_maggie

It's not about the bowl, it's about the motor.  Mixing heavier quantities of dough may burn out the motor.

Grampa Knuckles's picture
Grampa Knuckles

If you are worried about heavier dough, definitely save for an Ankarsrum Assistent.  Those motors will pretty much handle anything that fits in the bowl.   Remember its not the wattage that counts but how the prodcut uses the wattage. Ankarsrum has more power than it ever uses.

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Dough capacity and bowl size are largely unrelated.  The specs on that mixer are telling you that if you attempt mixing over 500g of dough, you may break the mixer.  Heed that warning.

I have no idea what your bread experience might be but if you are serious about baking bread, mix by hand and get really good at that.  Then you can turn your thoughts to a mixer.  Also note that many bakeries around the world produce significant amounts of bread using no mixer at all other than the hands.  Even with a mixer you will be at a disadvantage if your hands do not "know" the dough.

Jeff

 

catlick's picture
catlick

Electrolux DLX Assistent....Best thing I have ever invested in.

Wendy

Grampa Knuckles's picture
Grampa Knuckles

So agree supposedly the company now is in control of the name changes and it will be Ankarsrum Original worldwide.  Assistent, DLX, magic mill whatever you call it, I call it the best thing money can buy for your kitchen.

watto1903's picture
watto1903

What's your opinion on this? 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B008820EY4

Thanks for all input so far ;-) 

Kollin's picture
Kollin

· Special Aluminum kneading hook for yeast and bread dough (maximum quantity of flour is 2kg)It looks suitable ;)

watto1903's picture
watto1903

yay!

winstonsmith's picture
winstonsmith

It's suitability is entirely dependent on what you plan to do with it. If it's primary use is for bread I'd suggest a Bosch or DLX. If it's for small batches of dough which isn't too low in hydration it would be fine. Trying to make a dozen or so bagels with high gluten flour? Not so good. On the other hand a DLX isn't the greatest potato masher. 

Grampa Knuckles's picture
Grampa Knuckles

I would suggest save for the DLX (now Ankarsrum Original worldwide) well worth the money works for big or small batches. Use it for everything including bagels AND I use it all the time for mashed potatoes, works fantastic for me with steel bowl and roller.

Shuttleloaf's picture
Shuttleloaf

I bought one of these. It was noisy but seemed to work. Unfortunately motor died within a year of fairly light use.  Replaced it with Kenwood kmix, looks good and so far works well. cheaper than Kitchenaid and has more powerful motor

chris319's picture
chris319

I was reading reviews of electric mixers on amazon.com. Looking at the 1-star reviews I saw too many horror stories of motors going up in flames, gears grinding themselves to a nub and mixers doing the rumba across the kitchen counter. Let's face it, these consumer goods are all made as cheaply as possible in a certain far-off land where quality control is unheard of. Rather than purchase an electric mixer I bought a human-operated one. It rocks. I have total control over the mixing process and there is no motor to burn down the house. Mixing stiff sourdough bread dough was not strenuous at all and t is easy to scrape off ingredients that stick to the side of the bowl. So far I am totally happy with it, just love it. Best of all it cost a fraction of what an electric mixer would cost (ones that can handle bread dough are not cheap). Take a look at my new dough mixer: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00A0I1SZI/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1