The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Diamant vs Grainmaker #116

Roo-Shooter777's picture
Roo-Shooter777

Diamant vs Grainmaker #116

Hi everyone im really interested in milling my own grains for bread but i am having trouble picking out a mill im trying to decide between the Diamant grain mill and the Grainmaker #116 i cant find reviews on the grainmaker 116 but the model 99 seems to get pretty good reviews any help would be appreicated and also does anyone know why Diamant moved from Denmark to Poland and was its quality affected because of this? 

Thanks 

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

take a look at this thread on TFL - http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/7638/new-quotgrainmillquot-grain-mill-market-any-users

Especially scroll to the bottom for the last 3 or 4 posts, where you can find links to some user reviews.

TFL member proth5 owns a Diamant (made in Denmark). She sings it's praises. You might try sending her a personal message for more info.

Hope this helps - SF

Roo-Shooter777's picture
Roo-Shooter777

Thank you so much for the info SF I really appreicate that!!! 

proth5's picture
proth5

I do love my Diamant.  It is a Denmark made model. I am supposing that they moved manufacture to be closer to raw materials and to keep the already stupendous price of thing somewhat manageable.

You might contact Lehman's - the US dealer for the Diamant (if you are in the US or don't mind the cost of a call).  My going in position is that Diamant will not compromise its brand.

I recently found this review of the Grainmaker - I had not seen it before so here is a link http://www.goodbadanduglycomparisons.com/2011/06/26/grainmaker-grain-mill-no-99-review/ - maybe it is what you read.

The reviewer has had experience with a Diamant and while doesn't go so far as to regret its purchase (and says some fighting words about the fineness of the Diamant grind) it is very positive about the Grainmaker (but, again, wouldn't give up his Diamant.)

The Grainmaker was not in full production when I purchased my Diamant so I did not have to agonize over this.  If I look at the two, to my eyes the Diamant is more "beautiful" but your taste may vary.  It costs an arm and a leg, though.

I don't think you can go wrong with either mill - especially if money is no object.

Hope this helps.

 

Roo-Shooter777's picture
Roo-Shooter777

Thanks so much to SF anf Yourself!!! for helping me make my decision I agree with you also i dont think id regret either mill so i went by looks and just ordered me a Diamant!!! cant wait super excited 

Thanks Again!

 

proth5's picture
proth5

you love it as much as I love mine it will be money well spent.  It is a wonderful mill.

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

would love to know your opinion and how it works for you. Please do post back to this thread.

happy milling! - SF

Roo-Shooter777's picture
Roo-Shooter777

Sorry it took so long for me to reply, I absolutly LOVE it, its extremly easy to turn you can get really fine flour on the first pass, my four year old neice was able to turn it a few times on a fine setting I really like the way it looks, this is my first mill so im not to good at reviewing it but it work awesome for me if theres anything youd like to know about it please ask and thanks again so much!!!

proth5's picture
proth5

you are enjoying the mill.  Another Diamant user!  I'm thrilled!

Happy Milling!

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

As far as I know, besides Proth5, you're the only member of TFL who owns & uses a Diamant.

As you become more experienced with your mill, I hope you will take the time to post your experiences with it. TFL is (as you've discovered) an excellent source for opinions from experienced bakers on the various home grain mills on the market.

Best of luck to you in your bread baking and I hope you will continue to be an active member of TFL.

BBQinMaineiac's picture
BBQinMaineiac

2nd post here and already I can add something. I didn't think that would happen for quite some time.

I have a Diamant and have had it for years. It's a bear. IMO, for best use it should be set up in a static location. It's heavy to move around, that is, set up and take down. OK, to make it even worse I motorized mine with a 1/2HP slow RPM motor with a tiny pulley to slow it down as much as possible. That actually makes it more useable however even though it's also larger and heavier because of the motor and base that's required (have you tried cranking a large grinder?) . When I have a big job the Diamant is taken out and set up on a workbench in the shop. I never do this for small grinding jobs. I've ground a few 50# sacks of corn for the chickens with it, and every few months I fine grind beans and grains for the dog food that we make for our dogs. When the Diamant comes out I grind a lot because of the hassle of moving it. If I had a static position for the Diamant I'd use it for everyday grinding, but I don't.

For everyday grinding I recently bought an Ankarsrum Assistent with grain mill. It does a great job for grinding everyday flour and using it fresh. I'm still playing with it and so far have only ground hard white wheat and used the entire whole grain for bread. But now I'm going off on a tangent.

I can't compare the Diamant to anything, but the Diamant is a pretty fantastic high output grinder.

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

Thanks for sharing your experience. SF

cjjjdeck's picture
cjjjdeck

Sounds like they are both high quality, buy once in a lifetime machines.  I can't help liking that Grainmaker is manufactured in the USA, and Europe is still better than China in my book.

I found an interesting comparison chart on between the Grainmaker/Diamant/Country Living units:

 

Brand Name

GrainMaker No.116

Diamant

Country Living

Body type

Steel/aluminum

Cast iron

Cast aluminum

warranty

Lifetime Mill and Burrs

1 year

Lifetime Mill

(1 yr on Burrs)

Burr material

Machined alloy steel

Cast iron

Cast carbon

Burr size

6"

5"

4 3/4"

Bearing type

Sealed ball bearing

Teflon/steel

Shielded ball bearing

V pulley

Yes 14"

Yes 16"

Yes 12"

Weight

48 Lbs

58 Lbs

15 Lbs

Extension bar

Standard

Optional (149.50)

Optional (24.95)

Auger for large grains

Standard

Standard

Optional (39.95)

Grain breaker(for large grains)

Standard

Standard

NO

Handle type

Hand Turned Rotating Hickory

Non-rotating wood

rotating wood

Clamp

Optional

No

No

Cup per minute (average)

1 1/2 cup

1 cup

3/4 cup

Constancy of flour

Fine/crack

Fine/crack

Fine/crack

Paint

Red powder coat

Green/gold trim

White powder coat

Made in 

 

USA

Poland 

USA

 

Total cost

 

    $1270.00

 

$1299.00 +SH

 

$473.90 with auger and extension handle.

Disassembly of burrs:     front

Rear stationary Burr

No tools needed

 

No tools needed

No tools needed

 

Tools needed

No tools needed

 

Tools needed

Loose pieces when burr comes off

(washers, shaft keys)

No

No

Yes

I'm actually going to physically see the Grainmaker Mill in action at a trade show event this month.  I'm very interested to see what kind of quality it is..... it has tweeked my curiosity!

BBQinMaineiac's picture
BBQinMaineiac

Hmm, it appears changes were made somewhere along the line with the Diamant. Mine is possibly 20 years old.

Mine is an older model and doesn't have teflon bushings. It laso does have a wooden handle that rotates, but I don't use it since I motorized mine. Because of the cast on cast bushings on mine I drilled it and installed grease fittings and during each use I give it a partial shot of food grade grease.