The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

King Arthur Light

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

King Arthur Light

Has anyone else noticed that the bags of 5lb bag are an ounce light? My last three bags have been short, and that's not counting the bag itself!

Cheers,

Wingnut

Comments

pepperhead212's picture
pepperhead212

In their place of packing, that is.  And now, in the winter, the humidity in our homes is very low, as a rule.  More often that not, I find things I weigh a little over, rather than under, though I haven't weighed the flour recently.

Dave

 

 

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

While I don't doubt your obvious displeasure, I think it still behooves you to check your scale against a verified weight. It's difficult for me to believe that a scale made for domestic purposes only and not for retail trade  can be expected to be accurate as a purposed scale.

Have you contacted KAF yet? The company is very conscientious about their public relations and would probably appreciate hearing about this possible fault in their goods.

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

I am curious if anyone else has the same results. And yes, a pints a pound the world around. I have two digital scales and they both read the same thing. I did send them the image but have heard nothing yet.

Cheers,

Wingnut

LindyD's picture
LindyD

One US fluid pint of water weighs approximately one pound (16 ounces), resulting in the popular saying, "The pint's a pound, the world around." The saying is incorrect, since 1 US pint weighs 1.04375 pounds, and does not apply the world around, because the imperial pint used in Britain and its former colonies weighs 1.25 pounds. A different, but equally useful, saying for the imperial pint is "A pint of pure water weighs a pound and a quarter."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint

While I don't have an unopened five pound bag of KAF, I do have one of Gold Medal Better for Bread, which I use for my sourdough starter.  Weighed it and it comes in at 4.15#  

Flour loses moisture to the air and I think that may have something to do with it.  

grind's picture
grind

It's probably within the legal margin of error.  I always weigh my butter when make buttery things and there's almost always a variation of 5-7 grams/pound block.  However, it's never in my favor!

 

shuttervector's picture
shuttervector

You should really call them. I'm sure they will be shocked.

Cheer, Shuttervector

proth5's picture
proth5

an unopened bag?  Perhaps you have one of the recalled bags that contain the little blue balls (http://www.kingarthurflour.com/voluntaryrecall/) - they might cause it to be underweight as they certainly are less dense than flour.

Hope to hear their response...

 

PeterS's picture
PeterS

King Arthur's sales specification for their Sir Galahad (commercial name for A/P) has a stated water content of 14% maximum. In order to to that, they also need to specify a relative humidity and temperature--which I expect they would provide if asked. I'm going to guess that temperature is something like 20-25 deg C (room temperature) and the relative humidity is 70% or less. So, when they say 5 lbs on the package, they mean 5 lbs at 14% moisture, measured at 25 degC and 70% RH.

If the mill operates at 70% RH (I've never been to a flour mill, but I'd expect that at least the bigger ones have some kind of humidity control.), they will fill the bags to 5 lbs. 

If the plant RH is less than 70%, the flour may be drier and the same volume would weigh less. They could fill the bag to 5 lbs, but if the sales spec includes RH and temperature, they could fill it to something less than 5lbs and not contradict their sales specification, i.e. that volume of flour if exposed to 70% humidity would absorb moisture and gain weight.

A bag of flour filled and stored in a plant running at 70% RH, 25degC then shipped to a store and eventually ending up on a shelf at home when weighed at home should weigh less than 5 lbs because after the plant the relative humidity at all the subsequent stops is likely less than 70%--especially in any heated or air conditioned space. If given enough time to equilbrate the weight of a "5 lb" bag of flour could vary by 1-2 oz or slightly more. Of course, if the ambient humidity is greater than whatever the stated RH is at the time of packaging, the flour can gain weight.

I just weighed an unopened bag of King Arthur A/P that I have had for a couple of months and it was 78.55 oz. A bag of Gold Medal A/P of about the same age weighed 79.15 oz on the same scale. This included the bag, of course. The RH in my house is about 25-30% (yes, I have to fix my humidifier...).

There are state and federal regulations in the US regarding flour packaging & specifications.

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/specifications-conventional-bakery-flour.html

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Well I understand the humidity factor. I guess I was just curios if everyone from around the US had the same reading (and I am a cheap bugger). I mean every bag I buy is the same, 1 oz. short. Now if someone from say, Seattle had the same result then I would call BS on the humidity theory. The reason I am being so picky is that my wife has talked me into selling my breads at a farmers market and I need to cost them out correctly. So if I bought a 10lb bag of flour would it be 10 oz. short? You see what I am saying?

No word yet from KA, I will try again.

Thanks again for all the feedback.

Cheers,

Wingnut

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

is equivalent to a 2-ounce shortfall in a 10-pound bag, not 10 ounces.  Short is short, yes, but not necessarily as bad you project.

If you are buying to supply your baking needs for a farmers' market, you probably want to look for a flour distributor in your area and start buying 50-pound bags from them.  You are apt to get a better unit price that way, even if it is still KA flour.  You may also find more economical flours than KA that produce breads every bit as satisfactory to your customers.

Paul

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

You are correct sir, my bad. Coffee had not reached all the way up to my brain.

Cheers,

Wingnut

 

PeterS's picture
PeterS

50# bags ought to cut your cost by 1/2 or more.

Alvaremj's picture
Alvaremj

Congratulations first of all on venturing into sales! I just purchased 4 bags of KA bread flour and its raining here so 100% humidity, although not in my kitchen. All my bags came in at 5 LBs .05 oz. I think instead of calculating a loss on each bag of flour you should be more concerned about unsold loaves and factoring that into the price. I sell weekly to a couple families but decided to just use a flat rate based on a market comparison by weight of local bakeries and supermarket prices. I shoot for about 50 cents ingredient cost per loaf/ pound. Make sure to consider cost of fuel/electric and your time into the cost of each loaf.

J

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Thanks J for you comments.

Cheers,

Wingnut

PeterS's picture
PeterS