The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Which mixer?

blueribboncookin's picture
blueribboncookin

Which mixer?

Can anyone give advice on a 10 quart Vollrath mixer or a 20 quart Eurodib?  They are about the same price.

THANKS!

Comments

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

20 qt mixers generally make about 11 pounds of dough, the 10 qt would be half that.  Depends on the hydration level.  Go to the mfg web site, they may have capacity listed.  If not, go to Globe mixers, they have a chart that is likely not too different, showing 3 different hydration levels of dough...

blueribboncookin's picture
blueribboncookin

Amount of dough varies, would like to be able to do at least three multi-grain loaves at one time.  My 6 qt Kitchenaid can barely handle two loaves, afraid I am going to burn it up.  More concerned about quality, dependability & longevity of mixer & doing the mulit-grains .  If I had the money would buy a Hobart.  The Eurodib is made in China & looks "rough" compared to a Hobart.  Not sure where Vollrath is made, but like the look.

PeterS's picture
PeterS

If you are baking at home a 20lb mixer has a large footprint. The Vollrath is priced like a mixer made in China. Have you looked at the Assistent? 

http://www.pleasanthillgrain.com/electrolux_magic_mill_dlx_mixer.aspx

There are many good references for  it on this site.

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

The OP mentioned 10 and 20 QUART mixers, not pound.  As the old saw has it, a pint's a pound the world around, so these are 20 and 40 pound mixers.

I love my Electrolux, however, it isn't in that class.  10 pounds is the outer limits for the Electrolux, and it isn't NSF certified.  If the mixer is to be used commercially in the USA, it should be NSF certified.  Both your health inspectors and your insurance company will be happier.

 

PeterS's picture
PeterS

Oops, I meant 20 Qt with regards to the footprint.