The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Kamut-Turkey Miche with Black Cherry Hard Cider

isand66's picture
isand66

Kamut-Turkey Miche with Black Cherry Hard Cider

I was bored the other day so while surfing the internet for bread sites I revisited Breadtopia.com and was pleasantly surprised with some of the different flours and grains they offered for sale.  I decided to buy one of the ancient grains Kamut and also so hard red winter wheat called Turkey Whole Wheat Flour.  Below is some information from their website if you are interested.

Turkey Red Wheat, once the dominant variety of hard red winter wheat planted throughout the central U.S., is back in production in Kansas.  “Turkey” variety hard red winter wheat was introduced to Kansas in 1873, carried by Mennonite immigrants from Crimea in the Ukraine, fleeing Russian forced military service. In the mid-1880s, grainsman Bernard Warkentin imported some 10,000 bushels of Turkey seed from the Ukraine, the first commercially available to the general public. That 10,000 bushels (600,000 pounds) would plant some 150 square miles (10,000 acres). By the beginning of the twentieth century, hard red winter wheat, virtually all of it Turkey, was planted on some five million acres in Kansas alone. In the meantime, it had become the primary wheat variety throughout the plains from the Texas panhandle to South Dakota. Without “Turkey” wheat there would be no “Breadbasket.”

The Kamut flour is very similar to durum flour and here is some more information from their website.

Kamut® is an ancient grain and the brand name for khorasan wheat, a large amber wheat grain closely related to durum. Kamut is appreciated for its smooth, buttery, nutty flavor, and its high protein and nutritional content.  It contains a high mineral concentration especially in selenium, zinc, and magnesium with 20-40% more protein compared to modern-day wheat. It has a higher lipid to carbohydrate ratio, which means the grain produces greater energy and has a natural sweetness to counterbalance the occasional bitterness present in traditional wheat.

I went this weekend with my wife to the outlet stores and discovered a new store that sells only New York State wines, beers and spirits.  I picked up a mixed 6 pack of ales, stouts and ciders and decided to use the Black Cherry Hard Cider in my next bake.

I made a levain using my AP starter and some of the Turkey flour and AP flour.

For the main dough I used the Kamut flour along with Turkey flour, some molasses and dried onions that I reconstituted in some water and the Black Cherry Cider.

I followed my normal procedure below for making a miche and I must say I was very happy with the results.  You can taste the nuttiness of the 2 flours along with the hint of cherry from the cider.  The crust was nice and thick but the crumb was a bit tight which was probably due to the high percentage of the Turkey flour along with the Kamut flour.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I usually do this the night before.

Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, and 275 grams of the cider together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  Next add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces), molasses, and rehydrated onions and mix on low for a minute.  Add the rest of the cider unless the dough is way too wet.   Mix on low-speed for another 3 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.  I made 1 large miche but you can make 2 boules or other shapes.  Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

Comments

varda's picture
varda

shopping and baking this weekend.   And thanks for the info on Turkey whole wheat.   Mennonite farmers from Ukraine escaping forced military service.   Sounds like my family history only we weren't Mennonite.    Bonus - your bread looks terrific.  -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you Varda.  i was very happy with how it turned out never having used either flour before.  I bought some berries as well so I can experiment later.  

Glad you enjoyed the history lesson.

regards

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Kamut and durum semolina must be in this week with David Snyder doing his upgraded durum percent with his Pugliese.  Love the large amount of whole grains and the interesting ingredient list in your bake as well.  The crumb came out very open for this amount of whole grains.   The crust is thick, deeply brown and has to be tasty!  Very nice baking all the way around as usual.

I also have a durum, Kamut, millet, multi-grain sourdough with a YW kicker,  ricotta cheese, pistachio nuts, pumpkin and millet seeds in the fridge doing its bulk ferment thing like you do - until tomorrow sometime.  Went yellow and green with this one. 

Spring training is neigh here in Phoenix and the A's went yellow and green in KCMO at the old Brooklyn stadium with Charlie Finley as owner so long ago - those were the days.  My Mom used to drop my brother and I off at the ball park every time the Yankees; Casey, Mantle, Maris, Yogi, Whitey,  on and on.... came to play double headers - a common thing back then.  We were about 7 or 8.  We would find a way to get in free, never a problem the ticket takers were the same and they knew the twins would be coming.  We would watch both games and my mom would listen on the radio.  When the game was over she would come get us.   Great memories with my brother and the Yankees.  She would be arrested as an unfit mother today. 

Also, since the bread tomorrow is so Italian, will make it into an Altamura shape.  We put some Desert Durum in it and I really like it - so far.   The gluten development was amazing using French slap and folds.  Usually durum has pretty high protein but the gluten isn't all that great - not this time.

happy baking Ian 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA for your comments and sharing a bit of your childhood memories. I think you would like this one.  I would love to get some of that special durum flour to try as it sounds terrific.  I love Durum flour and your next bake sounds great and I look forward to reading about it.

I baked a fairly plain bread this morning for my wife who insisted on something without any whole grains or soarkers  or nuts or basically just boring.  You know I couldn't completely follow her directions though :)

I will post that one soon.

regards

Ian

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a little bit of the Desert Durum since almost all of it is spoken for before the crop ever gets in the ground and you have to beg to get some.  I got less than a pound - ony 300 g and used half for this bread.

I know that some folks involved with the reopened Hayden Mills are trying to get some in the ground this year to go with their Sonoran White.  Hopefully, they will have some by June or latest July since the Desert Durum crop here is harvested 2 months ahead of the rest of the durum in North America.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I dabbled in kamut last year or so and discovered it is a really tasty flour that produces a beautiful golden crumb. However, if it is the only flour in the dough, you will find it has a very elastic gluten that needs a pan for support. No pan equals a lovely pancake loaf. It also is easy to overproof. For those reasons, I find if you mix it with other, stronger gluten forming flours, you get a luscious,golden loaf with a finer crumb. I also like to use it for flatbreads and pizza dough. Yum.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for the info.  As you can see I used it in conjunction with the Turkey flour and it worked very well.

ian

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Ian,

Must have been the Turkey flour that kept your loaf from pancaking....I have had the same experience as clazar when using it alone - fooled by the high protein content thinking it would work like my ususal hard white ww.  I now mix it unless it's going into a loaf pan.  

When I was researching it's baking properties - after several Frisbee loaves of my own - I remember reading that it does well with spelt.  Think the post stated that the spelt was more elastic while the kamut was more extensible so they complemented each other but I don't really remember nor do I think that I have made a loaf using those 2 only to see what would happen....maybe it is time that I try......

Anyway, your loaf looks tasty :-)  Fun to try new flours.  

Thanks for the post and photos!

Take Care,

Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Janet for your feedback.  I usually always mix a new flour with something I think will give me a chance of getting some decent elasticity so I guess I lucked out this time.

Appreciate your kind words as always.

Regards,

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a Kamut / spelt pizza dough Janet!

isand66's picture
isand66

Great idea!  That can work.

evonlim's picture
evonlim

it is always a happy feeling when experimenting with new flour. have not bake a miche before but soon i will get my head to bake one. what a beautiful miche you have there, Ian. love the color on the crust. i bought a bag of kamut flour quite a while ago. don't know what or how to use it. now, i know.. :) 

evon

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you Evon for your comments.

If you try a miche just make sure to lower the temperature in your oven after the first 15 minutes or you will end up causing the crust to be too hard since a miche is so big it will take longer to bake than your usual loaves.

Regards,
Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Great miche, Ian!

Alas, No kamut here. I'm out of wheat berries too, and the my go to  store who sells good wheat kernels isn't stocking anymore. oh, i have to go hunting (again) for other sources.

lovely bread, Ian... and very wholesome and nutritious. 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you Kahlid.

I'm spoiled in that I can find so many resources only a click away for a reasonable price.

this one came out very well and smells so wonderful as well as tastes great.    It makes a nice hearty base for my turkey sandwich with smoked chipotle Gouda cheese.

look forward to your next post as always.

Regards, 

Ian

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Glad to read about Kamut, have been wondering where to find it. Somewhere in the last month or so I saw someone's comments about it and put it on my "try" list. Spelt and Kamut flatbread would be an interesting combination, maybe topped by Kalamata olives and spices....

Your bread looks like it has such a depth of flavor, both from your techniques and the flours. Enjoyed reading and admiring!

Barbra

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you so much Barbara.  I urge you to buy some as I think you will love it.  I'm a big fan so far.

let m know if you take the plunge.

regards

Ian

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Have enjoyed spending some time this morning reading about the development of wheat after reading about the Turkey wheat. This is a short but interesting version of some earlier strains: http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1996/v3-156.html

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks!  That is very interesting.