The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

100 % Whole Grain Rye and Spelt YW SD with Scald and Seeds - The Altus Test

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

100 % Whole Grain Rye and Spelt YW SD with Scald and Seeds - The Altus Test

After 4 Fresh Loafians recent trip to KA flour where they took the rye class from master baker Jeffrey Hamelman and the recent spate of posts on altus, my apprentice couldn’t help but devise a baking test to see if we could tell the difference, taste wise, when altus was added to a high percent rye and 100% whole grain bread.

Perfect bread holder for home made Pate Maison.

 

Our last bake was a test on ‘old dough’ that proved old dough makes a difference in taste that is noticeable and really quite profound.  Normally we would put altus in high percent rye bread, if we have it, but have never baked the same recipe at the same time under the exact same conditions with and without altus to determine first hand if there really was a noticeable taste difference.

   

We would have made a 100% whole rye bread for this test but didn’t have enough rye berries to grind up.  We decided to use whole spelt berries for 50% of the mix and bake it like it was pumpernickel, that had real pumperdime berries cut in half - long, low and slow, to bring out the dark color.  The instant coffee, cocoa, molasses, barley malt, honey and red malt also helped to turn this loaf dark.

 

The altus we used came from this bread - Multigrain SD/YW Brown Bread with Aromatic Seeds and Multi-Grain Scald which was also a multi-grain and YW/SD combo levain bread sort of similar to this one.

Today's lunch sandwich featuring the bread we used for the altus in todays bake that is still in the oven going on 7 hours.

You want to start the levain and scald the day before you bake.  We had a mainly rye and spelt 100% whole grain starter, that had been developed to its peak for the last bake.  It had been in the fridge for a coupe of days putting on some more sour.  It was used to make the combo levain with 30 g  of YW - a tiny amount in the scheme of things but YW really makes a huge difference to open the crumb in heavy whole grain breads.

 

All of the cracked and meal varieties of rye and spelt, half the total flour amounts used for the levain, along with some whole rye and spelt flour was used in the 1 build.  The rye and spelt berries were soaked overnight for 12 hours and then simmered for 10 minutes and allowed to cool.  The excess soaker / scald water was used to soften the altus so none of the flavor was lost.

 

It took about 12 hours for the levain to double on the counter.   While that was happening, we autolysed the dough flour, salt, all the add-ns (less the altus and the scalded berries) using excess soaker water for the liquid for 4 hours.   We like longer autolyse times for whole grain breads.  We also see no difference if the salt is included to the autolyse or not… so we always put it in.

   

Once the autolyse and the levain came together we mixed the heavy 76 % hydration mass with a big metal spoon to try and get things acquainted before turning it out on the counter and doing 10 minutes of French slap and folds when the dough really came together nicely from a structure point of view but still very sticky.

The dough was rested for 15 minutes before the first of (2) S&F’s were completed on 15 minute intervals.  The scald was incorporated in the first one and the seeds in the 2nd one.  Then the dough as divided in two with one dough 72 g more than the other since the smaller dough would have 72 g of soaked altus added to it. 

Once the scald was added the dough felt wetter than a 76% hydration dough because of the excess scald water carried along with it – even after draining and running a paper towel through the berries.

15 minutes later, the altus went into half and a minute of slap and folds was used to distribute it properly.   A few slap and folds were also performed with the other half to get it back into better shape gluten wise.

 We then panned each into half of a PAM sprayed large metal loaf pan and covered the non altus side with the lighter colored oat bran and the altus side with the darker wheat bran to mimic their actual color since the altus had made that side darker.

We then covered in oiled plastic wrap and allowed it to proof on the counter for 30 minutes before refrigerating it for a 12 hour retard at 38 F.  After removing the loaf from the fridge the next morning, we allowed it to warm up and proof on the counter for 6 ½ hours at 68 F until it nearly doubled to the rim of the pan.

We covered the top with a PAM sprayed double layer of heavy aluminum foil and placed it on the 375 F mini oven’s broiler pan that was half full of water along with (2) of Sylvia’s steaming cups that were heated to the boiling in the microwave.   Even though the loaf tin was covered we still wanted as much steam as we could generate in the mini.

After 30 minutes we turned the mini oven down to 350 F for 30 minutes.  We continued the baking in a falling oven with steam according to the baking schedule:  Many will notice that this is similar to the baking schedule for Black Pumpernickel that Hamelman uses.  This one just starts a little higher

 

Theise were 3"pieces of pumpernickel (altus left) that we got 12 slices out of the altus side than the 11 slices we got out of the non altus side.  For lunch the altus wa more moist and produced few crumbs when slicing and the non altus side was more dry and produced more crumbs when slicing.  It will be altus pumpernickel from now on.

375 F - 30 minutes

350 F - 30 minutes

325 F - 30 minutes

300 F - 1 hour

275 F - 2 hours

250 F - 2 hours

225 F - 1 ½ hours

200 F - 1 ½ hours

Turn oven off and leave the bread in the oven until morning or 8 hours.  Uncover and de-pan the bread.  Wrap the cooled bread in cotton cloth or linen for a minimum of 24 hours - 36 hours would be better.

A great lunch sandwich of Pesto Infused Roasted Pork Loin with; pepper jack cheese, lettuce, tomato and homemade Dijon mustard.  The fruits and veggies, include Poblano peppers cantaloupe, carrots, a homemade kosher dill pickle and a Minneola from the back yard.  A piece of this bread with a schmear of grilled salmon and cream cheese was included because it was go fantastic at breakfast.

Beautiful sunrise this morning!

Please note that the altus actually used for half of this loaf was 72 wet grams not the 144 listed in the formula below.  The 90 g dry and 144 g wet altus would be used in a full, non test loaf of this bread.

Crumb shots will be 24 hours from now.

The great aroma of this bread didn't start permeating the house until the temperature had been reduced to 250 F.  There were some unusual things and some expected from the crust points out.  First the loaf shrank a little bit while baking instead of springing. I have never used a  long low slow baking schedule for this kind of bread before and have never had one shrink - maybe this is normal?

The altus side came out of the pan much wetter than the non altus side and it was more caramelized.  We have never had a bread come out of the pan this wet before but this too may be normal?  When the aluminum foil lid came off, the aroma was incredibly pungent and pervasive.  It sure smells like a very nice black pumpernickel and I can't wait to slice into it.  But we will wait, even though my apprentice doesn't want to her being German and this loaf dear to her heart.  The loaf is now resting in its cotton cocoon for 24 hours - making it 32 hours after it finished baking before we will slice it. 

After baking and slicing the color difference went away,  the non altus inside was more open with larger holes.  the altus side was open too but the holes more even throughout.  The crumb was glossy and moist.  The YW really helped to open the crumb and make it lighter than just about any other bread of this type that I have made, seen or eaten.  Great taste - less weight :-)

The long low and slow bake at the end produced a finished temperature of exactly 205 F . Amazing!  This loaf was perfectly baked and the taste was just the best we have ever experienced.  The difference between the altus and no altus was slight though not nearly as great as we would have expected.  The altus side had a deeper and more complex flavor though and next time we have this bread for the altus. What a great loaf of pumpernickel!

Formula

100% Whole Grain Rye and Spelt  Sourdough - The Altus Test

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter

Build 1

%

 

SD Rye & Spelt Starter

15

3.83%

 

Whole Rye, Meal & Cracked

80

20.43%

 

Yeast Water

30

7.66%

 

Whole Spelt, Meal & Cracked

80

20.43%

 

Water

130

33.21%

 

Total Starter

335

85.57%

 

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

34.50%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Dark Rye

112

28.61%

 

Whole Spelt

112

28.61%

 

Dough Flour

224

57.22%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.79%

 

Water

150

38.31%

 

Dough Hydration

66.96%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

391.5

 

 

Water

317.5

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

81.10%

 

 

Whole Grain %

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

76.20%

 

 

Total Weight

971

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight does not include added water from the scald and altus

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Barley Malt

6

1.53%

 

Molasses

6

1.53%

 

Honey

6

1.53%

 

Red Rye Malt

10

2.55%

 

Rye and Spelt Altus

90

22.99%

 

Coffee Cocoa

20

5.11%

 

Spice Seeds

20

5.11%

 

VW Gluten

7

1.79%

 

Total

165

42.15%

 

 

 

 

 

Altus weighed 144 g after adding soaker water to soften

Spice Seeds - corriander, black and brown caraway, anise & fennel

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

Spelt

45

11.49%

 

Rye

45

11.49%

 

Total Scald

90

22.99%

 

 

 

 

 

Scald weighed 188 g when incorporated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Wow....can't wait to see how this one comes out.  What a great experiment.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

taste remain.  24 more hours...Jeeze!

evonlim's picture
evonlim

i am gonna add a WOW!! too.. the list goes on as usual for the ingredients. every bite must be satisfying with texture and layers of flavor. and yes, looking forward as usual to see the crumb shot.

evon

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of this bread with some grilled salmon and cream cheese - especially after having seen the outside and been overpowered by the fragrance of this loaf.  Only 20 more hours to go now :-)

Can't wait to see your next bake Evon! Your breads are very inspiring for me - and your lunches aren't bad either !

Happy baking

 

isand66's picture
isand66

So far it looks fantastic.  Can't wait to see your crumb shot and to hear about the taste.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The aromatic spices with the caramelized bake really are pronounced.  It's been wrapped up all day and I can  still smell it .

Will post the crumb shots tomorrow - After breakfast with cream cheese, pate and salmon.

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

If my apprentice tells the family about this beautiful bread, I will have to try it soon. I think it would be quite a skill level stretch for me however. Glad to see the crumb shots and read about the results too. From what I understand about carmelization, it takes all those steps that you followed so well.

Today I made a simple deli rye and set up for tomorrow's twice fed sweet levain- a Ken Forkish bread that he got from Chad Robertson. It is different in that you feed the starter and then three hours later you feed it again. Then 4-5 hours later you mix the final dough and do stretch and folds, continue bulk ferment for a total of around 5 hours and then if you are still awake and or still conscious, you put it into proofing baskets and into the refrigerator.

Enjoy  your bread and the well deserved laurels too!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bulk ferment with a decent sized levain around here and you would be lookingat goo or a bread that sould do much in final proof after shaping or spring in the oven.  I usual bulk ferment here is about 1 -1 1/2 hours before hitting the cold for retard.  Sounds interesting.

This bread is pretty easy technically.  Instead of slap and folds you can do 10 minutes in the  mixer with a dough hook instead.  Stretch and folds are no problem to incorporate the add ins, scalds are easy if you can build water with the seeds in i for 10 minutes an then let it rest for 24 hours, aromatic seeds are a snap.  It does take a long time to bake  but it did freak me out that when the baking was done the temperature inside was exactly 205 F and the crumb ended up being perfectly done.  This bread is worth the effort - it is special - and thanks for the kind words.

Your bake this week with your sisters sounds like fun.  Hope the goo stays away!

Happy baking  

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Hopefully those are meant to be mutually exclusive terms...at least in the perfect world they would be. For some reason my levain sat around for hours and never really got active. Last time I made this it was trying to climb out of the bucket. The idea of double feeding must be what develops such a distinctive flavor. There is a 1/2 teaspoonful of yeast added to the final dough that must reenergize the tired but happy levain.

This morning the oven spring was okay, but not nearly what it "should" have been. The bread however is really good. Very much like the Tartine breads with that almost gelatinous crumb and chewy dark crust. Succumbed to a mere 15 minute wait to cut into it and was treated to a steamy, melting butter drenched  slice for breakfast.

Now it is on to slow roasted leg of lamb with a first try at oven baked yogurtlu kanibahar (cauliflower with cheese to be dipped into a garlic infused yogurt)

Thank you the further instructions about the bread. I printed them out and hope to try baking next week.

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Awesome bake, DA! There's a good handful of ingredients in your loaf that I haven't experimented with (due to lack of availability), for example, spelt and altus. I also noticed that you used both brown and black caraway. What's the difference between the two?

Anyway, lookin' forward to your results---crumbshot, flavours and all. :)

Zita 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

this pumpernickel can be made with all rye, or even half rye and half AP flour (which was how the recipe I used for a guide was made).  The altus is just left over rye bread (in my case it was a different kind of  multi -grain with rye in it - that I had frozen -  which was baked sort of like a pumpernickel).  So you can make your own altus by baking this bread and then save 1" or (4) 1/4" slices for the the altus you will need for the next bake :-)  This bread w/o altus is pretty fine too.  The low and slow baking is what makes this such a fine bread.  It is the best; tasting, aromatic and looking  pumpernickel I have  ever baked. 

The brown caraway seems to have more flavor but the black stands out more from sight perspective.  I have another caraway which is brown but much thinner and longer, looks like a leaf rather than a seed, that is really pungent but we didn't us it this time.

You will like this bread Zita and it is so fun and interesting to make.  It is also another one you will master, along with baguettes and so many others, before you will feel like you are a well rounded bread maker.

Thanks for your comments and happy baking!   

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Congrats!  What a fantastic bake.  You must be very happy with the results.  I'm going to give this one a try soon.  What size pan did you use to bake this in?

Anyway, whish I could taste a slice of this one.

Great baking DA.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the kind words Ian.  When you make it I would add 15% to everything to get the pan to fill up more since it shrinks a little when baking low and slow.  Don't forget to spray the aluminum poil so it doesn't stick to the top of the bread.  I would also dock the top with a toothpick when it goes in the oven and I would make it with the altus too :-)  Here it is 2:45 PM and I have already eaten half the loaf for breakfast and lunch and snacking.  I hope there will be some for dinner so we can put some pate on it :-)

The pan was large loaf  that was 2 3/4" high x 9 1/2"long x 5 1/2 " wide out to out dimensions.  You will love this bread Ian.

Got to go plant the tomatoes.  Didn't grow them from seed this year after last year's heirloom disaster.

Happy baking Ian.

isand66's picture
isand66

Now that the snow has almost melted except for  a couple of stray icebergs on the lawn we need to put up our pop-up greenhouse so we can start the seedlings.

I just got back from the outlets and picked up some New York Ale, Cider and Stoudt to use in baking.  I also received an order of new flour from Bread Utopia which I have never used before.  I bought some Organic Turkey Wheat flour and Kammut flour along with some assorted grains.  I'm making a SD with the flours and a BlackCherry Cider with some re-hydrated onions and molasses.  Will be interested to see how this one turns out.

Wish I had some of your rye bread to try, but hopefully I can get the time to try this sometime this month.  Congrats again on such a great bake.

Ian