The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough Soda Bread?

Alvaremj's picture
Alvaremj

Sourdough Soda Bread?

So I figured I would try and concoct a soda bread with the addition of a starter. I know it kind of defeats the purpose of soda bread, but I'm curious. So here is my question. I know with baking soda it is a chemical reaction which creates leavening as opposed to fermentation.  If i use less baking soda in the recipie will the rise take longer? 

Any and all thoughts are welcome

J

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

There are a couple of factors here.  Quick breads that are leavened by baking soda and/or baking powder use the chemical reaction between acids and alkalies (bases) that results in the formation of water and carbon dioide (CO2).  It is this action that causes the leavening, and begins at room temperature as soon as you start to mix the dough.  That is why in this type of recipe, the instructions are usually to mix the wet ingredients together separately from the dry ingredients, and do a final blend of the two.  Recipes are formulated to completely react or use up all of the baking soda because if any remains, it leaves a bitter taste.  If your recipe includes baking powder, it is because the acids in the recipe (usually from buttermilk in an Irish soda bread) don't have enough oomph to rise the bread completely.  Baking powder usually has tartaric acid in it so it can leaven without any additional acidic ingredients.

Now for the starter part.  If your sourdough starter is mature and has LAB in it, it is on the acidic side.  Because you are adding more acid, you can replace some of the baking powder with baking soda.  I'm not sure if you need to do it, but the tartaric acid in the powder is sour and may leave an unwanted flavor if any remains unreacted.  Lastly, the starter will almost certainly not have enough time to have an affect on the leavening of the bread.   It will also have some developed glutens, which is usually undesirable in a quick bread and it may cause some difficulties getting a homogeneous mixture with the other ingredients.  If you want to do it for the taste, try it and let us know how it works.  You might want to work with a recipe for soda bread that you are familiar with so that you can evaluate the differences.

-Brad

Alvaremj's picture
Alvaremj

Thank you for all the detail! Interesting stuff

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

some SD recipes that had 1/4 tsp of soda in the mix to counteract the acid and make for a more neutral taste - usually not to help rise the bread.

There are also some quick breads that have a small amount of SD in them too -  to help with the bland flavor quick breads can have - again, not to help rise them.

kjknits SD English Muffin recipe (you can find with a search) has BS in it that is added right before the 45 minute final proof.  In this odd case the BS  does help make them puff up in frying pan - so there are exceptions too.

Happy baking 

 

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

Soda bread is so named because it is made with baking soda, end of story.  It wouldn't even taste right with sourdough starter in it.  And please, no baking powder, ever!

Donkey_hot's picture
Donkey_hot

I would rephrase it: don't call your creation a soda bread, if it is leavened with anything but...   :)

Kneads_Love's picture
Kneads_Love

Hi "J"

I do not know much about Soda Crackers but I recently posted a topic about sourdough pancakes.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/32308/meditation-sourdough-pancakes

My pancake recipe uses Baking Powder, Baking Soda and Sourdough. And I tried to explain how they each work. (Be sure to add the Powder and Soda in at the last minute so that you do not spend your rise prematurely.) You might find it helpful.

Good luck

Kneads_Love


Alvaremj's picture
Alvaremj

Thanks to everyone who relpied!

I made an adaptation of Hammelmans soda bread without the sourdough base. I agree with paddy L as far as it no longer being called soda bread. I decided  I don't particularly like soda bread, or maybe I just don't have a good recipie. I may try a sourdough with soda in it for flavor (not to levean) and will post if it turns out well. 

Also, does anyone have any good "traditional" Irish soda bread recipies?

Thanks

J

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

an instructor, at Diiane Allen'e cookery school at  Ballymaloe Ireland, you will find her recipes for both brown and regular Irish soda bread.  After spending nearly a week at Diane's 14 century Norman castle she runs as a hotel next to the cookery school, the brown is by far my favorite.  Both recipes are as authentic as they can be  and we make them all the time.  They also make a great base for scones.

Happy baking

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

About a year ago I posted this recipe for Irish soda bread.  The original source for the recipe was a video posted by Aidan Chapman from the Phoenix Bakery, but unfortunately the video has since been taken down.  It was fun and instructive to watch him work.  Aidan didn't measure anything, he just mixed things by feel and looks, so I tried to reproduce his recipe as best I could.  It is untraditional as it contains olive oil, honey and (sorry Paddy) baking powder.  It's a really tasty soda bread.

-Brad