The Fresh Loaf

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Yeast Water-Sourdough Combo Multi-Grain Miche

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isand66's picture
isand66

Yeast Water-Sourdough Combo Multi-Grain Miche

My last bake was a lemon sourdough which ended up as food for the squirrels unfortunately.  I decided to recover from that calamity and baking a good wholesome multi-grain bread.

I made a soaker with a bunch of different grains and let it sit for 24 hours in a bowl with hot water to soften it up.  The grains will soak up about 75% of the water which will end up making your dough very moist.

This bake came out excellent with a great dark and thick crust and open and moist crumb.

Soaker

45 grams Malted Rye Berries

80 grams Groats

75 grams Soft White Wheat

275 grams Boiling Hot Water

Mix water in a bowl with other ingredients and let sit covered at room temperature for 24 hours.

Starter Build 1

36 grams Seed (Mine is 65% AP Flour Starter)

114 grams European Style Flour (KAF)

45 grams Yeast Water

30 grams Water (85 - 90 degrees F.)

Mix seed with water to break up for a few seconds and then mix in flour until the starter form a smooth dough consistency.  Put it in a lightly oiled bowl and loosely cover and leave at room temperature for at least 6-10 hours.  The starter should double in volume.

Starter Build 2

150 grams European Style Flour (KAF)

95 grams Yeast Water

Mix the Yeast Water and flour in with the starter from Build 1 for about 30 seconds to a minute until all the ingredients are incorporated.  Cover and leave at room temperature for at least 6-10 hours.  The starter should double in volume.

Main Dough

Ingredients

425 grams Starter from above (It's possible you could have a little left over from above but I had exactly 425 grams)

100 grams White Rye Flour

100 grams Potato Flour (KAF)

300 grams European Style Flour (KAF)

All of the Soaker from above

325 grams Water (90 degrees F.)

16 grams Sea Salt (or table salt)

22 grams Honey

Procedure

Prepare the soaker 24 hours before you want to bake the bread.  When the soaker is ready, make sure to drain any of the water it has not soaked up.

Next mix the flours together with all the water except for 90 grams for about 1 minute and let it autolyes covered, for 30 minutes in your mixing bowl .    After 30 minutes add the levain, honey, salt and the soaker and mixed on speed #1 for 1 minute or by hand until everything starts to come together.  Add additional water as needed and mix  for 4 additional minutes.  Note that this is a very sticky dough so don't be afraid to use all the water but make sure you don't end up with soup.

Since this dough is very wet I put it directly into my oiled dough rising bucket and did a couple of stretch and folds.  Rest it in the covered bucket for about 10-15 minutes and do a total of 2-3 additional stretch and folds within 2 hours.  After 2 hours and several stretch and folds (I did a total of 3) place the dough in your refrigerator for 12 - 24 hours.

The next day I let the dough sit out at room temperature for 2 hours.  After 2 hours I formed it into 1 large miche and put it into my floured cloth lined basket.

Let the dough sit at room temperature for 1.5 to 2 hours.  It should start to get a little puffy but it won't rise a lot so don't be alarmed.

Score the loaves as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

I pre-heat my oven to 505 degrees F. about 30-40 minutes before baking.  I add 1 cup of boiling water to a heavy-duty sheet pan on the lowest shelf in my oven and I have 1 oven stone on the top shelf and one above the steam pan.

After placing the loaf in the oven I add the water and lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Since this loaf is so large I had to lower the temperature after 30 minutes to 425 degrees and baked another 35 minutes until it reached an internal temperature of 205 degrees F.

Let the bread cool for at least 2 hours or longer until you try it.

Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely multigrain bread, Ian, what a nice redemption! The bread must be full of complex flavors, Well done.

 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

thanks Khalid.  You would like this one.  It's very tasty for sure.  Yes, nice to bake something edible after my last experiment!

Thanks for your kind words.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

What a beautifully baked miche!  Boldly baked with an open,  soft, moist crumb that has a chew to it thanks to the soaker.  This is my kind of bread and I'm glad you are getting your breads on the more healthy side and more to my liking :-)

We will poke you until you you make some sprouts and malts .....

That is some nice bread Ian.  It has to taste better, have better crust / crumb and have better chew than your average  lemon squirrel bait bread :-)  We don't have squirrels here........probably because of all the scorpions and rattlesnakes.

Happy baking

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

You've baked yourself one fine B-day present if you ask me, well done, and way better than a new tie that you can't eat :-)

Have a great birthday Ian and many more!

Bake On

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA...appreciate your kind words and B-day wishes.  You are right about this bread...it is better than a tie I can't eat for sure!  I was very happy with how it turned out and it's only a matter of time before some sprouts end up showing up in my multi-grain breads!

Regards
Ian

evonlim's picture
evonlim

hello.. happy birthday to you Ian. nice baked again. my first attempt of making yeast water with raisins. yes, it is bubling! does it enhance the flovor of the bread? i wonder..

evon

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you Evon.

Good luck with the Yeast Water.  If you use it in a bread with white flours you will notice the flavor a little, but mostly it helps provide a softer and more open crumb.

Regards,
Ian

evonlim's picture
evonlim

that is good, soft and more open crumb :) thanks Ian

evon

varda's picture
varda

and I'm sure packed with flavor.   I notice you use potato flour in  your breads.   Makes for a soft texture?    I've never used it.  -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you Varda.

I think the potato flour helps a little with the texture and helps the shelf life of the bread a bit.  It's worth a try if you get a chance to pick some up.  I either buy it at KAF or sometimes the grocery store has it from Bob's Red Mill.

Regards,

Ian

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

This bake looks delicious, Ian! Must've smelled wonderful, too---that roasty, toasty aroma only unique to boldly baked breads.

Keep on baking and have a happy belated birthday. :)

Zita 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you Zita for the B-day wishes.

Yes this one smelled terrific almost like it had dark roasted coffee in it, but in this case it was just the combination of the grains.  I was very happy with the flavor of this one.

Look forward to seeing your next creation.

Regards,
Ian