The Fresh Loaf

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Can anyone help me with a question about making dough in a Panasonic, please?

Aberdeenshire Quine's picture
Aberdeenshire Quine

Can anyone help me with a question about making dough in a Panasonic, please?

I've always baked a wee bit of bread- one fail safe recipe, basically- but I was away with friends at New Year and they made wonderful bread, so I've bought a couple of books and have got stuck in.

My problem is that I'm time poor. I want to come home and throw the dough in the oven; so I did a bit of research and bought a really good Panasonic bread machine; and I've made a couple of perfectly fine loaves in it. BUT I really want it to make the dough for me, so I can then bake it in the oven. And, to my consternation, the timer, which I had checked out, doesn't work on the dough cycles. And it always asks you to switch off the machine when the cycle is finished.

So, my question is this. If I put the dough cycle on and go to bed/work and not switch the machine off at the end of the cycle, how much trouble can I get into? Can I just leave it in the pan, and turn it out, shape it and leave it an hour before baking it. Or do I have to take it out of teh machine as soon as it's done?

mini_maggie's picture
mini_maggie

Why on earth wouldn't they make the timer work for the dough cycle??  If your machine is new and this is how you want to use it, I'd suggest trying to return it and buy one with a timer on the dough cycle. 

If you mean to set the dough kneading before you go to work/bed and leave it in the machine for hours after the dough cycle is finished, your bread will be overproofed (risen too long) and likely fall.  To delay baking after rising, you need to retard the dough at cool temps to slow the yeast down during the delay. 

Without a timer on the dough cycle, your options as I see them are (1) to set the machine on regular bake cycle with the timer, but time it so you can catch the dough after its rise but before the machine starts to bake.  Your manual should give you some clue as to when this happens on the normal bake cycle of your machine, or (2) have the dough cycle finished before you go to work or bed, remove the dough when it's finished and place it in your fridge overnight, then when you get up or home from work take the dough out and let it rise to room temp before baking in the oven. 

boco's picture
boco

the advice from mini maggi is your only option and correct

jannrn's picture
jannrn

That I seem to have collected over the years....none of them have a dough cycle timer, so as was said earlier, either time it to be ready to come out for a rise then bake, OR make the dough, form your loaf and put it in the fridge for the day, then bake it when you get home. I prefer the machine to do the dough for me alot of the time too, so I do alot of that kind of baking on my days and weekends off!

Good Luck!

jemar's picture
jemar

I actually have the Panasonic bread machine myself and it is an excellent machine, the best available in the UK, by all accounts.  I have looked in the manual this morning and you are perfectly correct in saying that the dough cycle cannot be automatically controlled as you can control the baking cycle but I think that is because you need to be there to take the dough out as soon as it is ready to be shaped.  I think the advice given above is the only way to go, either do your dough only cycle at the weekend when you are around or retard your dough in the fridge for when you have time to bake it.  Good luck!  

By the way, I live in N.Wales but I am married to a Scotsman from Dundee, not too far from Aberdeen.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Got one of those timer plugs for lights?  Plug your macine into it.  Set to provide power to mix up your dough and turn it off again.  In your case the freshly mixed dough is waiting for you when you get home.  You just have to figure out how to keep the yeast away from the liquids.  (Maybe it can float on a soda cracker)  (or work in a yeast paste when you get home)  (or have it mixed early on and use a lot less yeast.)

I've used a outlet timer with coffee makers.  That way I don't have to get up and wait for the coffee to drip.   The hot coffee and aroma is waiting for me when I come down the stairs.  :)

"Panasonic" reminds me of my first clock radio...   

mini_maggie's picture
mini_maggie

Don't know about the Panasonic's instructions for ingredient order, but many bread machines keep the yeast away from liquids by putting liquids in first, then flour, then make a small well in the top of the flour in which you put the yeast.  There's enough flour that the top and yeast stay dry overnight. 

edited to add: Great idea!

jemar's picture
jemar

As I said earlier I have this machine and in this particular model the yeast is put in FIRST, then the flour with the salt, butter , sugar and water going in last on the top.  Different makes of machines use different orders of putting in the ingredients, the important thing being keeping the water and salt away from the yeast.

jcking's picture
jcking

Go with the external timer. Even though the instructions say to put the yeast in first it doesn't really matter if your using instant or bread machine yeast. If using Active Dry, maybe. I whisk all my dry ingredients together and pour over the wet. I like to fluff it all up and whisk it well. If you look at the Zo machine it has 3 programmable modes and a timer. A very good machine.

As far as yeast touching salt, I not sure. I think that may true for a wet yeast, but a dry yeast, I don't know. I'll be traveling for a few weeks and I promise to test the theory when I return.

Jim

Aberdeenshire Quine's picture
Aberdeenshire Quine

What fantastic advice from all of you. I really appreciate it. I'll work it through and see how I do....