The Fresh Loaf

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Tartine Whole Wheat miche & boule

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breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Tartine Whole Wheat miche & boule

What can I say, I like big loaves.  I have made the Tartine Country bread a number of times in all sizes, from 500 gm to 2 kg, and am always happy with the results.  I refreshed my starter when I returned from a week away with the intention of trying the whole wheat loaf as well.  On my last visit to Central Milling I picked up a 5# bag of Acme Organic Whole Wheat flour, so what better bread to test it on.  I pretty much followed the method in the book, with a small deviation because I forgot to hold back the required 50 gm of water to add with the salt after the autolyse, so I had to add some extra water.  The formula was supposed to be 80% hydration, and the extra water took it up to 83%.  The formula is quite basic:

Levain          200 gm    20%

Water           830 gm    83%

WW flour    700 gm     70%

AP flour       300 gm     30%

Salt                  20 gm      2%

I made a double batch and shaped them into 1 miche at 1950 gm and three smaller boules at around 700 gm each.  The bulk ferment was about 4 hours at a controlled 74˚F with S&F at 30, 60, 90, 120 and 180 min.  After shaping, I retarded the miche and one smaller loaf overnight (about 16 hours), and continued proofing two of the smaller loaves for 3 hours.  Baking was on a stone heated to 500˚F which was reduced to 460˚ when the boules were peeled into the oven.  Steam for 15 min. then turn on the convection to 425˚ for 20 min. more, rotating as necessary.  For the miche, the convection temperature was 415˚ and the convection bake time was 35 min. 

The loaves showed lovely bloom and grigne.  I have been playing with different scoring lately, and I like the effect using two interlocking half-circles.  A bit cumbersome to do on the large loaf, but it's a nice look.  I think the bake times could have been a bit longer.  Though the loaves registered over 205˚ and were left in a cooling oven with the door cracked open for 10 min., I didn't get the nice singing and crackling crust like I do on the Country Loaf, which I suppose is due to the higher hydration dough and not being baked out completely. 

The crumb on this bread is sublime - airy and with a fairly soft chew.  The flavor is nutty and wheaty with a distinct tang on the retarded loaves (I didn't get to try the others).  Curiously, the 2% salt seemed a little on the light side.  This photo is the crumb of the smaller loaf - I'll post the miche once I cut it.  The final size of the miche was about 10 inch diameter and 4 inch tall at the dome.

-Brad

Comments

linder's picture
linder

Brad,

That is one MONSTER bread!  Great crust and nice looking crumb!  I really like the scoring you did on the loaf, it opened up very well.  I like the idea of more whole wheat in a bread. 

Enjoy!

Linda

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Appreciate your comments.  Big loaves are just fun, if a bit intimidating to get off that peel and into the oven.

-Brad

 

varda's picture
varda

your jaunty scoring and have tried to copy you to no avail.   Really terrific crumb as well.  -Varda

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Hi Varda - thanks.  The scoring looks jaunty, but with the rotating and all, it violates the rules that scores should be fast and a single stroke.  I guess maybe it isn't that critical after all.  Keep trying and I'm sure you'll get it.

-Brad

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Get the loaf spinning and hold the lame at a low angle to the bread starting just off center and move your hand out to the right if right handed or left if left handed.*

 

*The above said tongue in cheek, for the baker who has everything and requires one more gadget for their craft. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the crumb so glossy that you weren't off too far with the timing to take it out.  This bread looks fantastic and with so much WW the crumb is open, bloom and ears are very pronounced.  A blistered thick crust is a favorite.  They have to taste great.

Nice baking Brad.

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Hi DA,

The crumb was indeed glossy and the openness of the crumb was a pleasant surprise for all that whole wheat. I thought it needed more bake because it was on the razor edge of being so soft that it was almost gummy.  Also, comparing the crust thickness to the picture in the book, mine is clearly not as boldly baked as Tartine's.  But it does taste great.  Thanks for your comments.

-Brad

Update: The first loaf was cut after only 8 or 9 hours cooling.  When I waited another day or so to cut the miche, the hint of gumminess was gone and the sour tang was much enhanced, as expected.  So i think the bake times were ok after all.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Great looking crumb!  Looks nice and moist and nutty flavored you expect.

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Thanks Ian.  It was nutty flavored and moist.  Most enjoyable.  Pretty tangy, too.

-Brad

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Excellent crust, and crumb, BFF!

What is the % of Wholewheat in the formula?

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Kahlid - thanks for the comments.  The final dough was 70% whole wheat, and the levain was 50/50% WW/AP flours.  So overall, it works out to 67% whole wheat (800 gm WW and 400 gm AP).

-Brad

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Excellent crumb for such a wholegrain percentage, Brad. Inspiring!

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

Between you (with this one) and breadsong's post from FWSY, I'm sold on making a run at 70% whole wheat levain now.  Superb crumb for so much whole grain.  Crust ain't too shabby either :-)

Nice baking!

Tom

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Thanks Tom.  I haven't seen Forkish's book yet, so I don't know how it compares to the Tartine.  But the taste was great.  Curiously the miche developed much more sour tang than the smaller boule, and I haven't a clue as to why.

-Brad

tuziksmith's picture
tuziksmith

Hi Brad,

Beautiful loaves! I am going to try higher percentage of whole wheat too. You inspired me! I also want to try a combination of whole wheat and whole grain rye. I think it will be delicious.

How did you store your loaves so the crust doesn't soften, both cut and uncut loaves?

Keep up the good work!

Olga

 

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

The bread keeps well on the counter for a couple of days, and the sour tang increases during that time.  If I don't finish the loaves (or give them away), then I will cut them into meal size pieces and freeze them, although this is not considered optimal.  After thawing, heating in a 350˚F oven for 5 minutes or so will restore the crispy crust.  I highly recommend the use of more whole grains, something I have been doing of late.  The flavors are richer and deeper, and the breads more satisfying.  Thanks for your comments.

-Brad

tuziksmith's picture
tuziksmith

Thanks for your reply, Brad. I agree with you wholeheartedly! More whole grain makes the bread heartier:))), deepens the flavor. I noticed that your recipe uses quite a bit of whole wheat. Is this one of Chad's recipes from his book or is it your variation? I haven't gotten the book yet but it looks like I will splurge and buy it for my library. Does the book have sourdough baguette recipe? 

A question about your baker's percentage. Is that customary not to include flour and water from the levain in the total recipe calculations? I always include the water and flour in the levain but maybe I've been doing it wrong all along? Also, did you make Chad Robertson's levain? Is it used at 100% hydration in this recipe?

Appreciate your help. Happy baking!

Olga

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Hi Olga,

The whole wheat formula is essentially from the Tartine book, except for the minor change about additional water that I noted earlier.  Chad does have a recipe for baguettes that uses both a levain and a poolish.  He also substitutes AP flour 65% for much of the bread flour (remaining 35%) in the final dough.  The levain is 100% hydration that uses a very small seed and long fermentation (roughly 1:7:7 overnight at 65˚F).  I have had my going for about 2-1/2 years now and didn't have to use his recipe to develop a levain, so I can't comment on how it fares compared to others.  As for the book, it has food recipes from the Bar Tartine restaurant as well as several variations on his breads.  It has loads of background and technique information, many with photos to help beginners. But if you are looking for a book with lots of bread recipes, this probably would not satisfy you.  Maybe you can get it from a library before you commit to purchase.

As for bakers percentages, many of the formulae that I have seen do not include the levain in the calculation, and many do.  Chad keeps the levain as separate item, while Hamelman includes it in the overall formula.  I tend to do both - when separate it is easier to measure and scale a recipe, and together to calculate the true % hydration.  BBGA published their guidelines a few years ago, and there are a number of threads on these forums that discuss it.  There is no right or wrong, I guess it is whatever a baker is more comfortable with.

Best of luck!

-Brad

tuziksmith's picture
tuziksmith

Thanks, Brad! Will look into borrowing the book from the library.

Olga

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Their guidelines are nice but I never understood why they did not also provide a spreadsheet. 

Here is one to track their more complicated example. 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/36772/bbga-bakers-spreadsheet

the link has a link to a google doc I created. It has not been any use to me personally, but I wanted to give it a go to see if it would help someone who wanted the tool. Maybe one day I will need it. 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

This is nice!  I love the ears you achieved on this bake.  This is the first I have seen of this particular recipe.  Adding it to my to-do list for sure.

Thanks for sharing!

John

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Thanks for your comments John.   The Tartine book has several tucked into the back of the book.  Initially I focused on the Country Bread, but once I started looking at the rest of the book, there are lots of interesting things to try.  I love to play with the scoring, too.  Let us know how yours turns out.

-Brad