The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Multigrain SD Altamura - Not The Priest's Hat

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain SD Altamura - Not The Priest's Hat

Varda caught the the original Pope's Hat was really a Priest's Hat and then we found out it wasn't and Priest's Hat either so we got a chance to fix that, inserting Priest's for Pope's and also fixing that to remove the Priest's Hat entirely and our spelling and grammer errors too.  Hope this clears up the confusion in a confusing way.

We were making a stiffer levain Italian style and decided to revisit another Italian bread – Altamura style like David Snyder did here

Pane tipo di Altamura from "Local Breads"

 

 This bread is also one where the whole multi-grains were going to be in the levain.  We also decided to go more Italian style with a stiff levain - 51%.  Since the whole grains  only amounted to 35% or so and not too much rye or spelt,  we thought a good 30 hour retard would really bring out the whole grain flavor and the sour too.

  

First off you simmer the soaker seeds for 3 minutes and then let them soak for 24 hours.  We would normally use the excess water at the end of the soak for the dough liquid but forgot to this time - so we saved it for the next bake.  Remember to rum a paper towel or two through the well drained soaker seeds to get rid of as much excess liquid as you can, otherwise, the dough will bee wetter than it already will be.

 

Nothing like a big picture of the reject :-)

The levain was made over (3) 4 hour builds and an additional 10 second one at the end.   20 g of the water in build 3 was added and mixed it at the 12 hour mark.  The levain was very stiff at 51% before this addition and so the normal doubling we look for went out the window.   We got 50% and that is normal for this levain type.

  

The rest of the ingredients, less the soaker seeds, were autolysed for 1 hour before mixing with the levain.   Then 10 minutes of French slap and folds followed.  After a 15 minute rest 2 sets of S&F’s followed on 15 minute intervals.  Then the soaker seeds were added and 2 minutes of slap and folds were used to rebuild the gluten structure and incorporate the seeds.

 

The dough was then allowed to develop on the counter for an hour in a well oiled covered bowl where the plastic was oiled too.  The dough was then retarded for 30 hours in the fridge at 38 F.  It easily doubled in volume while in the fridge. 

 

After removing from the fridge and letting it warm on the counter for 2 hours we took out first shot at shaping a Pane tipo di Altamura.  This turned out to be the pre-shape since it ended up looking like 2 ugly stuck together baguettes. Plus it wouldn't  fit on the mini ovens 12” square broiler pan. 

 

So we took another shot at the shape a few minutes later and it came out a lot better - but not at all like it should have if we were writing home about it.  But, it now fit on the top of the broiler pan too – a really good thing.  It then went into a trash can liner for final proof and was placed on a heating pad set to low with some kitchen towels on top of the pad.

 

After and hour it had popped itself open at the seam so we tried to fix that by re-sealing and we were almost half way successful. Another hour and it had puffed itself up well enough to bake.  Into the 450 F preheated mini oven it went after throwing a ¼ of water in the bottom of the broiler pan and heating one of Sylvia’s steaming cups for the vented top where the bread would bake. 

 

After 12 minutes of steam the Pane tipo di Altamura had sprung nicely so we removed the steam and turned down the oven to 400 F, convection this time.   We continued bake for 10 minutes rotating the bread 180 degress every 5 minutes.

 

This my new apprentice.  As I was hiking in Sabino Canyon in Tucson yesterday , this Roadrunner followed me on the trail for about 1/4 of a mile.  I didn't want to scare it off but as I took a few step he would take a few too.   Next thing you know he was walking with me as I hiked along. 

They are expertly camouflaged and if they don't want you to see them - you won't.  I already miss my new hiking buddy :-(

Then we turned the bread over on its top and continued to bake for 8 more minutes to brown the bottom when the bread reached 205 F in the thickest part.  The bread had baked a total of 30 minutes.  The crust was nicely browned and crispy but no huge bubbles which is the norm for baking this way in the mini.   The crumb went chewy and soft as it cooled.

The crumb turned out very soft and moist with chewy bits of soaker seeds - just liked we hoped.  The surprising thing about this bread is that it tastes great.  The grain flavors and sour are front and center.   It has to be one for best tasting crusts and crumbs we have ever managed and my new apprentice would have approved as much as old one did. 

Formula

Starter Build

Build 1

Build 2

Build 3

Total

%

SD Starter

22

0

0

22

4.80%

Oat

3

5

3

11

3.24%

Buckwheat

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Quinqoa

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Amranth

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Kamut

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Spelt

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Dark Rye

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Whole Wheat

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Millet

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Farro

3

5

3

11

2.40%

Water

30

2

22

54

11.79%

Total

82

52

52

186

40.61%

 

 

 

 

 

 

SD Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

88

19.21%

 

 

 

Water

65

14.19%

 

 

 

Starter Hydration

73.86%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

20.09%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

3

0.66%

 

 

 

Toadies

4

0.87%

 

 

 

Vital Wheat Gluten

10

2.18%

 

 

 

White Malt

3

0.66%

 

 

 

AP

350

76.42%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

370

80.79%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

8

1.75%

 

 

 

Water

275

60.04%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration w/o starter

74.32%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Scald & Soak

0

%

 

 

 

Buckwheat

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Rye

20

4.37%

 

 

 

WW

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Kamut

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Spelt

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Farro

20

4.37%

 

 

 

Total Scld & Soak

120

26.20%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

458

 

 

 

 

Water

340

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Starter & Adds

74.24%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

926

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

36.24%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

DA...the crumb looks fantastic!  Your Pope's hat...or is it a torah scroll?  Well anyway, your bread looks great and as you said tastes great so add another notch to your belt for a great inventive bake.

I love you new friend....have never seen one of those Road Runners except with W.E.C. chasing him.  My father would have loved to meet your friend as those cartoons were always his favorite, so thanks for giving me a good memory along with your great bread.  I think I have almost all of the ingredients to give this one a try in the near future.

Thanks for sharing and I'm glad to hear your wife had a great birthday weekend.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to a Torah Scroll.  The Pope's head would have to be mis-shapen and oddly dented and tilting to  one side to use this hat :-)   Turn's out it really is a Priest Hat - not a Pope's hat. 

This is a great tasting bread.   The 30 hour retard had to be the difference along with the long list of multi-grains.   If you have the ingredients for this bread... you really need to bake more and use odd ingredient combinations - Oh wait, I forgot who I was talking to -  Never Mind!!

You will like this one Ian.  I kept waiting for my trail friend to 'meep' at me  and I kept checking for anvils falling out of the air too.

Happy baking!

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

Is it just me or is there something Ridley Scott about that loaf?

Your starter formula made me grin.  I don't know whether to imagine you standing in the pantry muttering "a little o' dis, a little o' dat" or sitting at a drafting table designing these potions.  That one's gotta win the Starter Feed Complexity Sweeptakes by a landslide.  No WD-40?  A bake of extremes to be sure: 50% hyd levain is bone stiff, and 30 h retard sounds more like a vacation to me.  But can you call it Altamura without any durum? (or did I miss it?).

Great post and even better looking loaf, esp that crumb.  Wish I could taste it.

Tom

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that little bit of amaranth and millet this bread would hardly be edible :-) No telling what would happen without the Toadies - the rest of the list might have been more uppity if the Toadies weren't there to keep them all in line ....eeerrr...on the list.  Michael Wilson said that 48% hydration was very common for Italian breads so I though I would give it a go.  The levain doesn't want to  double for sure but after 12 hours it will get to 50%.   It was very powerful after that, once it got hydrated,  so it might be a new thing to do all the time - like Toadies! 

I see I didn't answer your question too  - I subbed Kamut for the Durum since it is a yellow flour too and a very close cousin to durum.  I didn't use very much of it though.  Kamut (with a capital K) is the trademark name for a durum variety grown in North America.  The Priest's Hat is also an Altamura shape.  So it is a close cousin of a real Altamura - twice removed of course :-)

It tastes great Tom- you would like it.  The crumb is fantastic and crust isn't bad either.  All in all a bread to make more often.

Glad you liked it  Tom.

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

:) Whoa, multigrain indeed---and that's how it should be done!

Once again, excellent bake, DA. Haven't attempt an Italian starter yet, nor have heard of farro until now, but it seems like its worth researching. Also, I thought Italian starters were meant to be less sour, but your loaf tasted otherwise. (And that's okay. Sour's good!)

All the best,

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

for the confusion of what Farro really  is.  There are 3 closely related but different grains grown in Italy depending on climatic conditions.  The Italians differentiate them by size - large medium and small Farro.  In reality these sizes are really - Large grain size - Spelt, medium grain size - Emmer and small grain size - Einkorn.  Italians call them all Farro - where the confusion comes in.  To confuse matters more Italians also call Emmer 'True Farro' - the real one when they want to get technical!    The heads of grains on the stalk for each are also different sizes as well. 

Making things even more confusing the US Government doesn't go along with the Italians when it comes to 'True Farro' and say True Farro is really Spelt  - not Emmer like the  Italians.  But, the farro I have is a smaller grain than the spelt I have.   So,  I suspect that the farro labeled grain I have is really emmer - the Italian 'True Farro'.

German's tend to grow mainly spelt, Italians tend to grow mainly  emmer ...and einkorn with its German name,  is grown in both places but in very small quantities which is why it is very hard to find - even there.  In North America, spelt and emmer are more commonly grown which is why we can get them here.

Some white Italian starters used for panettone and many other non sour Italian white breads are made with white flours, they tend to be more liquid , are refreshed every 4 hours or so for a couple of days so that the sour pretty goes away with the end result being very fresh.  I went the other way with this using a  fairly sour whole grain SD seed and fed it whole grains at very low hydration which produced a much more  sour bread - the kind we prefer.

I agree with you that multi grains should be used in multi-grain  bread but maybe not so many :-)  It certainly can be made with fewer but a stiff sour starter will be required to get the tang.  I've never really made a stiff starter like this, even the starter we store in the fridge is quite a bit higher hydration.   We sure liked the outcome of going stiff.

Glad you liked the bread.  Happy baking Zita!

 

 

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Thanks DA! That was a very informative post and I appreciate the time you took to type that.

You know, it seems like your brain is a library full of bread knowledge, containing nuggets of helpful tips and suggestions. I wish I was that knowledgabe about breads, haha.

Take care,

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

 will be full of bread things too - some of it even useful  I know this because I learned it all here, or because of TFL community -  in a year.  There are many, many  generous folks around TFL that put my bread knowledge to shame ... by far and away too.  In another few years though , we are bound to be catching up with them Zita!   Now,  if I wasn't so old, maybe I could do a better job at remembering it all..... That's why I have an apprentice  who is only 8 years old :-)

Bake on my friend!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I'am sure it did, DA.. with all the goodies in , and accumulated experience, and your unfailing affinity for unique and interesting ingredients; it is bound to taste great.

The Crust looks quite appealing too.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

very much Khalid!    The long ferment in the fridge and using that very stiff whole grain starter  and levain really brought out the sour we like so much.  The large soaker really gave the crumb a nice chew too.  Crumb and crust were both chewy and soft once it cooled.  An all around new favorite.   Now we will start taking the whole grains up some to make it a more healthy bread and more to our liking too.

Glad you liked it Khalid and glad to see you back to baking your healthy breads again!    

evonlim's picture
evonlim

got me drooling again!! so much work involved too. wait till one fine day when i can gather all the ingredients and time and patience...

evon

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

it will be hard to accumulate many of these grains but even with just a few you can get close to the taste if you have whole spelt, dark rye and whole wheat, use a stiff whole grain starter and do a 30 hour retard.  You want to keep the rye and maybe the spelt down some because of the long retard.  The soaker it won't make any difference.  You certainly have the baking skills to make this bread no problem.  I will explain how to shape the Priest's Hat in the reply to Varda.

Glad you liked this bread.  It is fun to make and uses rather odd levain hydration and retard times too.  Something different to compare to what you normally do is always a good thing in my book.

Happy baking!

varda's picture
varda

write-up DA, and very detailed procedure.   Following Franko, the Altamura style loaf should be shaped with a simple fold, which if you are lucky will puff up the right way and look very elegant.   Is this what a pope's hat is?    Love your new acquaintance.  (To call him/her a friend or apprentice seems a little hasty to my way of thinking but I'm from New England.)    -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Altamura is supposed to have some Durum Semolina in it but, I didn't put it in since I only have it in flour and not  the whole grain to home mill for the levain.  So, I subbed whole Kamut, which is a very close cousin to Durum and has that yellow color  durum semolina is known for.   Franko is also right.  Some breads in Altamura are pressed out to an oval and gently folded once round side to round side. 

To make the Pane tipo di Altamura, (not a priest's or a Pope's hat that I though I was making) you elongate the oval by pressing it out so the straight sides are longer.  Then you make the first fold the same way as a simple Altamura from round end lining up to to the other round end and seal the round edges.  This gives you an elongated half moon shape - an elongated Altamura.  Then from the flat fold end you make another fold to 3/4th of the remaining distance toward the round end pressing the flat folded end down and seal.  So this is supposed to be a two fold shape.  I couldnlt remember where I had originally seen this but finally found it here - a David Snyder post Pane tipo di Altamura from "Local Breads".  The Priests Hat as David says in his post, is a boule where the bench scraper is dto dut a very deep cross int eht op and the points are pulled apart.  Nothing like this shape at all. 

I don't like the way this 2 fold Altamura shape rises during final proof when the dough is wet like this one though.  Lat time I wasnlt happy with it   So what I did, after the first Altamura fold in half that matches up the round ends, I actually form a short baguette folding twice and sealing it to the mass about 1/4th of the way from one end to  keep the surface taunt.  Hten we form a batard shape from the other large end, folding and sealing 3 times to keepit tauight.  Where the small and large meet I tried to seal the seam between them but didn't do such a a good job this time and it sort of came loose in the middle. section. 

You were the one to inspire my original take on this bread here  - back in May

Altamura Shaped Semolina Multi-Grain SD with Seeds and Sprouts

now I see the real name is Pane tipo di Altamura and neither Pope's Hat or Priest's Hat!  The Catholic's and Italians must be totally bewildered :-)  Now we have to go back and make all the corrections, again  .....also typical!

Your inspiration of the Altamura simple fold lead me to another Altamura shape that David had posted.

I've seen all kinds of Roadrunner's while hiking over the years but never had one follow along with me for such a long way.  This bird was an odd duck for sure.  Any animal that odd is usually a bad apprentice I get stuck with or the other way around :-)  This one decided to stop following while it still could and is probably pretty thankful for that :-)

Nice catch Varda.

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

I didn't even notice priests wore hats.... that bread looks great and so did your rose... I have been off the computer, since my arm was a bit restricted... should have responded sooner.  Beautiful bread as per your usual! LOL

Happy Baking, Diane

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

around here either but not being Catholic, I am hoping that with the Pope's Selection Conclave coming up soon, we will see a priest from Altamura wearing one on TV  for ceremonial purposes.  I'm also going to see if I can find a picture of one on the Internet .  Then we would have a better idea what they are supposed to look like :-)

Thanks for your complements.  The rose looked very nice and it tasted really good but this bread tastes better.   Not a whole lot better but a lot better :-)

Glad your surgery went well.  It's the physical therapy that isn't so much fun.....but keep after it.  My Dad at 81 and is having his hip replaced in a couple of weeks.  He has already had his knee replaced.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

;)    Love the veggies !   (and your hiking buddy)

Anna

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Pope's or Priest's Hat but the shape I was making wasn't either.  It was a Pane tipo di Altamura shape that David Snyder had posted about here Pane tipo di Altamura from "Local Breads".  To top it off I wasn't even shaping it right with the wrong name, since this bread is supposed to only be folded 2 times not 3.    At least David knew what he was talking about and how it was to be shaped :-)

The hiking buddy wasw a real thrill and veggies are one of our favorites since they are so healthy!

Happy baking Anna.

catlick's picture
catlick

Your bread looks stunning! I'm jealous!  I started Pane di Altamura 2 days ago, and it's in fermenting right now.  Not exactly doubling after 3 1/2 hours.  (Yikes, hope it's ok...starter was going crazy but mixed dough not so much)  Great minds think alike... I'll let you know how it turns out...;~)

Wendy

PS I'm using Local Breads recipe

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

David Snyder used.  Hopefully your Altamura came out better than mine did. At least it was named and shaped properly :-)  I made up my own recipe to get some whole grains in it but it sure tasted fantastic.   It is fun to do new shapes too.   Maybe one day I will do a real Priest's  hat. I saw a video on youtube of an Italian baker making them - Couldn't be easier when he was doing it :-)

Happy baking the Altamura way!

catlick's picture
catlick

Well, I THOUGHT I formed it like the recipe said....(supposed to form like an orange segment)  It kinda came out looking a bit indecent! HA! Color wasn't at dark as I thought it should be on top, but the bottom was gorgeous.  I love the taste , almost like cornbread! I'm trying his foccacia with the next batch of this....(and the starter is getting huge and gorgeous!) 

  Grazie, for inspiring me!

xoWendy

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is real bread porn!  Hopefully the foccacia will be lees graphic :-)  I'm sure the 'orange peel' taasted fine though.

Happy baking