The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Help! Starter fed gluten free flour

BakedVanilla's picture
BakedVanilla

Help! Starter fed gluten free flour

Hello everyone. This is my first post on the forums, although I am a long-time reader of this site. I couldn't find the answer to my question, which is why I'm posting. Sorry in advance though if this sort of thing has been asked before!

For over a year now, I have been maintaining my starter, which I started from the Carl's 1847 Oregon starter. When I'm not baking with it, I keep it in the fridge and feed it all-purpose flour once or twice a week. Earlier today I asked my husband (for the first time ever) to feed the starter, and he fed it a gluten free flour instead of the regular all purpose! Yikes!

It is a gluten free flour made by Bob's Red Mill, made of garbanzo bean flour, potato starch, tapioca flour, whole grain sweet white sorghum flour, fava bean flour. I now have about 5 cups of starter that I have no idea what to do with. Is the whole thing ruined now? Is there anything really awesome I can make with it? Do I have to restart the starter from scratch? Will it go bad or moldy; as I suppose the yeasts won't be able to digest the gluten free mix?

Moral of the story: keep a back-up of your starter. I know I'd be way happier right now if I did. Also, don't let someone who doesn't know anything about baking feed your starter, so you can't harbor feelings of ill-will later.

Any help you guys could give me would be great.

pepperhead212's picture
pepperhead212

Welcome to the board! 

I wouldn't be worried about it - it is mostly the starch the organisms feed on, not the gluten, and that has a lot of starch in it.  I would just take a small amount of the starter and mix it with  5 or 6 times the amount by weight of the usual flour/water ratio you use, then repeat this a few times, discarding the excess (or even try using it?).  After a few times, the ingredients in that non gluten flour will have been diluted considerably, like making a starter with rye in the beginning.  

Dave

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

sticking to the schedule you normally use.  Use the starter.  When it hits wheat flour in your dough recipe, you will see it kept working and the wheat will let you see it trap the gas.  Nothing is lost here.  No need to dump or replace the starter.  If you judge the starter by rising, look for familiar aromas and the bubbles running up the sides of the container instead.  It will be just fine, maybe the gas might have a different aroma for a little while but you know your gluten free flours.  Keep your nose on the fermenting aromas, they will tell you your starter is on track.    With the next feeding go back to it's favorite food.  (Unless you stumbled upon a lovely accident just in time for Valentines day.)

Mini

Ford's picture
Ford

I agree with the above comments.  As for keeping a backup by all means do!  When your starter is again active, add a little flour to it and spread the paste on to a sheet of parchment paper and let this dry at room temperature.  Put the dried starter in a labeled, zippered, plastic bag and store this in a cool spot.

Ford

BakedVanilla's picture
BakedVanilla

Thanks guys, I feel so much better knowing all is not lost. In fact, it doesn't seem like a big deal at all.In the future I'll definitely keep a backup.

My husband is lucky too, as it would have been a valentine's day for one.

teresakay's picture
teresakay

http://www.artofglutenfreebaking.com/2010/10/sourdough-starter-gluten-free/

 

 

Warm Hello all :)

id like to understand why gluten free flour is alledagely not going to work for sourdough?

i found this website yesterday and i used my spelt starter and added buckwheat flour and water i cup of each

its not doing anything right now and im worried

i love the idea of going gluten free

this womans website talks about it like its an easier starter to maintain than a gluten flour

still i am not getting how that works

if the yeast feed off of the starch then my mostly buckwheat starter should take off

am i right?

she did not suggest i use the spelt starter..that was my idea

she suggests a person use sorguhum and add red organic cabbage leaves (the white film is the yeast so do not wash it off)

i did not do this part as i figured my spelt starter would work

any one have any thoughts?

kindly

thanks

teresa

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

it will not rise, there is no gluten.  But you will have a fermented taste and see air pockets forming next to the container if the starter is wet enough to see them.  CO2 gas will be coming off the starter.  It shouldn't be too hard as you are already familiar with a ripe starter.  You just can't judge readiness by expansion or rise.

Now you have to figure out how you can trap the gas to raise a gluten free loaf.  

teresakay's picture
teresakay

warm hello

 

thank u...would u be willing to take a look at this site?

http://www.artofglutenfreebaking.com/2010/10/sourdough-starter-gluten-free/#comment-13296

 

this woman is making sd starter using gluten free flours

she says something about high protien flours are needed

i dont get it

but she and many others are making sd starter using gluten free flours

they simply add xanthaum gum once they mix up a batch of bread to it will hold together nicely

i used buckwheat flour

i assumed that was high in protein

but no action

teresakay's picture
teresakay

u say all i need do is trap the gas?

this womans website seems to mention high protein gf flours

perhaps that does something?  the protein?

wish i knew the science part

knowledge is power

artofglutenfreebaking's picture
artofglutenfree...

Greetings folks!

My site is the one referred to with the gluten-free starter and the gluten-free bread made from the starter.  It is possible to make gluten-free starter and bread and many people have done it.  The concept that a bread needs gluten in order to rise is incorrect.  It needs some sort of binder that behaves like gluten.  In the case of my bread, I use xanthan gum as a gluten replacer--which allows the structure to be formed that the starches cover that the gas pushes against to raise the bread.

To @BakedVanilla--why do you think your starter is ruined?  It should be just fine.  The yeast love the ingredients in the mix that was used to feed your starter.  If you starter is no longer bubbling, it's not due to the mixture it was fed--it might be due to over or under-feeding or incorrect storage temperatures.

If people are interested in gluten-free starters, you might want to read my post (below)--you will see it includes the science of starters.    This might help disspell any incorrect assumptions folks have about gluten-free sourdough starter.  It's not that different from gluten-filled starters. :)

--Jeanne

http://www.artofglutenfreebaking.com/2010/10/sourdough-starter-gluten-free/

teresakay's picture
teresakay

i only resorted to using a spelt starter because until now i was lead to believe from the sd sites that its not possible to make sourdough without gluten

im so curious to learn why people have been led to believe this

i know how to make bread using a spelt starter

my question is :

i want to learn what parts of the gf sd starter process are the same and what parts are different

so far i understand that the consitancy is going to be a batter and i will need to use xthantum gum in the end to help it bind

u mention on your site that a gf starter is easier to maintain  ...How is that:)  id so look forward to that process being easier :)

also u mention high protein flour...is this a important part of making your gf starter a very active  one

is this the cruical step that ones need to use a high protein....i read that it was starch that the yeast feed off of.....this part is not clear to me

 

 

kindly

thank u sooooo much :)

 

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

so follow the links.  He had erased many photos posted here and helpful information, but that later became his business,  would be nice to see him contribute again.  I did manage to catch a ghost thread, listed under "deleted" bottom of the list in my favorites.  See if this gets you there...   Also check the site search for more current information.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/14476/excellent-gluten-free-bread

There has been a lot going on in GF breads after this post but you can see that it is possible to make starters and bread.  In reading this old thread, one trick was to lay plastic wrap over the dough/starter to know if gas was being produced, trapping the escaping gases.  It is also possible to use a lid on the starter and a plastic tube (think aquarium air line) running into the bottom of a glass of water, count the rising bubbles per minute to determine peaking.  Heh! check this out!  Now that is motivation!  

http://www.lucegfbread.com/

You will notice gas levels increasing and then leveling off for a long period of time lowly tapering off.  Where dough visualy falls back due to gluten reaching a limit (fall and rise again) GF flours will not rise much but continue to produce gas at that peaking level.  It is the way yeast works and is seen in Debra Wink's graph.    

artofglutenfreebaking's picture
artofglutenfree...

FYI:  A gentle reminder to say that it's demoralizing to try to be helpful in a forum if others discount your information with the claim that someone else, who has taken down their information, knows more.  Charles is doing awesome work and I applaud him for that, but there are many folks out there who are doing awesome work, as well.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

although I do see now how it could be read that way.  Sorry.  

artofglutenfreebaking's picture
artofglutenfree...

Thanks, Mini Oven!