The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

yeast

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emmamarie's picture
emmamarie

yeast

hi, 

 

If anyone can advise, I'd be so grateful. When recipes ask for instant yeast  does anyone know the equivalent in Italy. I use fresh yeast sometimes. I found using active dry yeast but my breadt never turns out properly. 

 

thanks in advance

 

emma

 

 

 

 

OldWoodenSpoon's picture
OldWoodenSpoon

older thread useful.  In general the topic originated over yeast types available then in Italy.  The link points to a conversion chart, and a brief discussion follows that may also be useful.

OldWoodenSpoon

emmamarie's picture
emmamarie

thanks, i'll have a look. 

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Hi Emma,

I can't really help with your question on availability of instant yeast in Italy.  But when you say your bread does not turn out properly with active dry yeast, do you proof your yeast before using it?  Instant yeast can be included with the dry ingredients when mixing the dough, but the same is not true with active dry, which must be activated in a bit of warm water for 10 minutes or so before mixing into the dough.  Hope this helps.

-Brad

 

emmamarie's picture
emmamarie

yes I proof my yeast but still something does not turn out properly. I can usually smell a strong smell of the yeast and a part of the bread seems not properly baked. I am thinking of giving up using active dry yeast. Instead, I will try fresh yeast or instant yeast. 

thanks

Ruralidle's picture
Ruralidle

I much prefer to use fresh (or frozen but defrosted) fresh yeast.  I use between 10g (if very fresh) or 15g if old or defrosted to 500g of flour in lean doughs, more if making something sweet like brioche.