The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pain de Campagne 30 Jan 2013

jgmathis23's picture
jgmathis23

Pain de Campagne 30 Jan 2013

Pain de Campagne, following DiMuzio's formula in his "Bread Baking, an Artisan's Perspective" book.  Thanks to richkaimd for recommending this great book.

90% KA unbleached bread flour

10% Hodgson Mills rye flour

68% hydration

25% of entire batch made up the night before as an 18 hour "old dough" preferment.  Kept it in the fridge for about 15 of those hours.

2% salt ( a little less than the 2.2% called for by DiMuzio)

0.5% Red Star instant yeast.

Baked two loaves sequentially in dutch oven at 450%, 20 minutes lid on, 20 minutes lid off (25 minutes for the second loaf).

I deliberately baked second loaf until crust dark brown, as recommended by Ken Forkish in his "Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast".

First slice, after an hour cooling, tasted hearty but light.  I think the rye flour adds most of the flavor, and also keeps the crumb a little tighter than it would be otherwise.  Should make good sandwich bread as well as "bread for its own sake".

Best to All

Jim M

Comments

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

Thanks for the note.  I'm appreciate knowing that I'm not whistling in the dark.

The bread looks great!

isand66's picture
isand66

Your crust on the loaf to the left looks great.  Nice and dark the way it should be.

What procedure did you use to mix the dough and develop it before forming your loaves?

If you want a more open crumb, a combination of higher hydration and using stretch and folds instead of kneading will get you there.

jgmathis23's picture
jgmathis23

I used a Kitchen Aid stand mixer.  I held off on adding the old dough to the new until after a 20 minute "autolyse".  That created some problems getting old dough to blend with the new, and required mixing for 10-12 minutes or so, mostly on slow speed or the next speed up.  I did two stretch and folds during bulk fermentation, but no kneading.

Do you think I sort of "overmixed' and that's what kept the crumb sort of closed looking?

Thanks,

Jim

isand66's picture
isand66

I would think that a 10-12 minute mix probably lead to your tight looking crumb.  There are so many ways to mix dough with each one having it's advantages and disadvantages.  I find the less you touch the dough the better for the most part.  If you read some of my posts on this site or my own at www.mookielovesbread.wordpress.com you will see how I mix my doughs to achieve a pretty consistent open crumb.

Regards,
Ian

jgmathis23's picture
jgmathis23

Ian,

Your website is awesome!  Some very advanced looking recipes there, but I'm sure if I look through it a bit more I'll find an elementary one to try.  My plan as a newbie is to work my way up from straight dough recipes, through the commercial yeast preferments (like the old dough method I just used), and, once I'm a bit more proficient, consider the levain type breads.

This weekend's attempt is the White Bread with Poolish on page 95 of Ken Forkish's "Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast" book.  Poolish is sitting over on the counter right now.  We'll see how it looks tomorrow morning.

Best,

Jim

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Jim.  You have a good plan and I'm sure once you feel confident enough you will tackle the levain type breads head on and never look back!  I downloaded his book a few weeks ago after I read some positive reviews on TFL but I have not read it yet so I look forward to hearing how your bake goes.

Regards,
Ian

jgmathis23's picture
jgmathis23

So here's how the White Bread made with 50% Poolish turned out:

The two slices left for the "crumb" picture were all that remained after having a few old friends over for dinner.

I got a little overzealous on getting the crust brown.  The bottom got a few outright black spots.  Still we had a grand evening with our friends.

Lessons learned:

1. Move the dutch oven one level higher in the oven next time.

2. If you look past a few black spots in the crust, most bread is not bad at all.

3. Same goes for your friends

Jim

isand66's picture
isand66

Nice job Jim,

looks like you got a very nice crumb and crust.