The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Multigrain Yeast Water Bread with Sprouts, Scald, Seeds, Nuts and Prunes

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain Yeast Water Bread with Sprouts, Scald, Seeds, Nuts and Prunes

The last bake was so nice and this one is very similar except for a few differences that….. made a difference.  The sprouts, seeds, nuts, prunes and dough flours were nearly identical except we ran out of barley berries.

  

Yeast water replaced the SD starter.  The YW levain used white whole wheat flour as half of the mix instead of the home milled whole grains of the previous bake.  The amount of whole grains and the hydration was increased 5% to 59% and 74% respectively.

  

The first 15 minutes of the bake was at 500 F instead of 450 F (because we forgot to turn it down after the pre-heat) and the resulting total bake time was reduced 15 minutes to 35 minutes.  We think the higher initial temperatures reduced the spring and the higher hydration caused the chacon to spread more as well.   The openness of the crumb was affected in that the usually large holes of the yeast water were muted .

  

Another change was that instead of putting the dough into the basket right after the  S& F was complete and then allowing the dough to ferment in the basket, on the counter for 1 and ½ hours before being retarded, this dough was allowed to ferment in the bowl for 1 ½ hours before being placed in the basket and then it was then immediately retarded.

 

Both bakes had a 40 hour retard and a 4 hour warm up on the heating pad before baking.  Instead of using decorative knots in the chacon we used balls instead since the dough was too slack to make into ropes without adding some flour. 

We were going to add some aromatic seeds like coriander and anise but forgot to put them in.   I thought that if we just put them on the top they would burn after seeing the color of the crust after yesterday’s bake. 

 

One thing we noticed was since the dough was much wetter it absorbed the rice flour in the basket so the white surface outlines of the last bake were mainly gone and we had a better picture of the deep, dark, mahogany color that must have been under the white on the last bake.

 

The crumb is more moist than the SD as was expected since YW makes a more moist crumb in bread than SD for some reason.  Glad we baked this to 206 F instead of 203 F like the SD version since it was still moist and soft.

The crumb is as open as the SD but the largest holes are in the YW version.  The most uniform holes holes are in the SD.  I never thought I would say this but, the YW multi-grain bread is more tasty, at least to my pallet which is quite unlike the Brownman I know and my apprentice loves sometimes :-)  Both breads are terrific ans some of the best that have come out of this kitchen.

Formula

YW Starter

Build 1

Total

%

White Whole Wheat

100

100

29.41%

AP

25

25

7.35%

Yeast Water

100

100

29.41%

Total Starter

225

225

66.18%

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

Hydration

80.00%

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.29%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

Toady Tom's Tasty   Toasted Tidbits

5

1.47%

 

Red Malt

3

0.88%

 

White Malt

3

0.88%

 

Buckwheat

24

7.06%

 

Quinoa

24

7.06%

 

Whole Wheat

24

7.06%

 

Spelt

24

7.06%

 

Kamut

24

7.06%

 

Dark Rye

24

7.06%

 

Potato Flakes

20

5.88%

 

Oat Flour

20

5.88%

 

AP

145

42.65%

 

Dough Flour

340

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

7

1.51%

Of Total Flour

Soaker & Sprout   Water

240

70.59%

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

70.59%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

465

 

 

YW 100. Sprout and   Soaker Water

340

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

73.12%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.19%

 

 

Total Weight

1,057

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

59.14%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Scald

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

 

Kamut

12.5

3.68%

 

Quinoa

12.5

3.68%

 

Buckwheat

12.5

3.68%

 

Rye

12.5

3.68%

 

WW

12.5

3.68%

 

Spelt

12.5

3.68%

 

Total Sprouts

75

22.06%

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

Sunflower 15, Pumpkin   15. Prune 20

50

14.71%

 

Pistachio 15, Filbert   20

35

10.29%

 

Barley Malt

10

2.94%

 

Total

95

27.94%

 

 

 

Comments

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

Man, between you and breadsong, dab, I'm beginning to think TFL is sending a not-very-subliminal message to me:  "Toad, unbury those seed catalogs -- it's time to place your orders for Spring!".  OK.  OK.  I got the message.  Sheesh.

NICE baking, pard.  I'd love to bake/taste one of these, even though my beloved has declared, "Go ahead, but don't expect me to eat any of it." (she of the "no bits" persuasion).

Cheers,

Tom

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

checked my formula and sure enough I have an error in it.  On the previous bake I used up all my Toadies, so we had to make some more.  I was upping the whole grains in this bake and had a huge batch of new Toads and put in 10 g instead of 5.  I shortened the name for TTTTT to Toadies or Toads since I use them for every bake.  I consider them one of the best flavor enhancers right up with red malt.  

Your take on Rugbrot was the inspiration for these bread concoctions my apprentice cooked up and, while the first one was in the middle of its 40 hour retard, Breadsong posted her Super Seeded version .   I think these bread are the very best to munch on with butter and with smoked meats, pate and cheeses.    This is what bread is all about in my book.

Glad you like these breads and thanks for the Toadies - here is a picture of the last batch being roasted.  Oat and wheat bran, sifted middlings,  wheat germ and  9 grain cereal.  What a great combo and great idea you shared!

 

Pre-Toad                                                                                              Toadies after toasting but pre buzzed

Happy Baking

JOHN01473's picture
JOHN01473

About the Toady Tom's Tasty Toasted Tidbits.

so you say you use.
Oat and Wheat bran
Sifted middlings
Wheat germ
9 grain cereal.


I was wondering what I could use as an equivalent.

I was thinking I could get Linda at Stanton Post Mill to source me some if I can tell her what the grains are and at what stage they are at in milling.

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

whole grains I buzz up in my Krups coffee mill and include, kamut, spelt, rye, barley, wheat, buckwheat and quinoa of late.   I buzz them for some time and then sift out the bran with a larger hole sieve, then buzz them some more and sift out some more with a smaller sieve.  This sifted part I buzz some more and sift it again.  What ever is left is what I call the middlings.  You certainly don't need them the mix and you can use what ever she has on hand.

Toasted they sure add much to the flavor of the bread .  Once you toast them and give the Toadies a smell before you even put them in bread, you will immediately say 'wow!, and wait to taste this in some bread.'

Lucky that you have such a fine source for all of these flours and the middlings.  I'm sure as a miller she will know what they are and what she has of them.

Happy baking John

JOHN01473's picture
JOHN01473

I will show this to Linda and see what she can come up with.
I have noticed that the "9 grain mix" seems not be available in the UK.
I know what's in it and will ask Linda if she can re-produce that.
I would not want to steal anybodies intellectual property or trade marked items,
but I can't be the only one this side of the pond who wants to try these.
John.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

9 grain cereal at Sprouts.  They have a 6 grain cereal to. It is in their bins so there isnlt any packaging to know who makes it.   I have never looked on the ingredient list to see what 9 or 6 grains were in the 'mix' for either one.  I'm sure that these things aren't intellectual enough to be trade marked. Oddly, I've never had them as a hot cereal either but zi might make some forbread after reading what Janet does.

I'm convinced that most bread is better toasted and that seems to go for Toadies too. 

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Beautiful loaf and color of the crust.  I have yet to try adding pistachios to a loaf because the kid still gives me the 'eye' when I mention it....He prefers them straight out of the shell :-)  He eats the nut and one of our dog waits hoping he will drop an empty shell onto the floor for him to eat.....He eats just about anything and follows my son everywhere especially when he is in the kitchen.

I am having fun this week with my multi grain recipe.  Not as elaborate as yours is....Just coarsely ground 7 grain mix that I cook up like oatmeal and then I use homemade buttermilk for the final liquid.  After it has bulk fermented all night the dough is heavenly to shape in the morning.  Tempted to try using the grains whole but don't want the dough too nubby  but who knows how it will morph over time.  I sure you know how that happens :-)

Thanks for the post and photos...thank your apprentice too even though she forgot to remind you to add the anise and coriander.

Take Care,

Janet

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

cooking, rather than scalding, the course part of the mix?  I have always wanted to make a roux for some bread, a technique I have never tried - like so many others.  Then you let it sit on the counter overnight?  Never used buttermilk either but I have some outdated buttermilk in the fridge and since it is already sour ......The nubby part of this bread is the crust, which is crunchy by itself, where the seeds were exposed to the heat directly not horribly bad though.  The sprouts and soaker seeds in the crumb are just chewy.

I think pistachios and filberts are the most unused nuts in bread making besides cashews and lychee nuts and a few others that come to mind  :-)  I really wish the coriander, anise and fennel seeds were in this bake along with some hemp, millet, chia and sesame - not that this bread really needs it :-)

Happy baking Janet

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

I coarsely grind up my 7 grain mix so it is similar to steel cut oats. Then I cook them like I do oatmeal or steel cut oats so it is just like a hot cereal.  (Not sure I would consider it a roux because it is thicker.)  I add part of the salt and all of the honey to this just because it makes it easier (less ingredients to add) when I do the final dough.  I know you don't shy away from a lot of ingredients being added but I try to keep it minimal or I get flustered :-O  - probably because I am cooking dinner, feeding dogs and washing dishes while mixing the final dough.......One can only juggle so many tasks before completely loosing it :-)

I cook the grains in the morning and then let them sit out until I mix the final dough in the evening and then the whole shebang gets bulk fermented overnight in the refrig..  In the morning I let the dough warm up for a couple of hours and then I shape and proof.

Janet

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the explanation of your method Janet.  Will have to give it a go.

Happy baking

isand66's picture
isand66

Another success DA.  I love the moist open crumb you achieved.  I have not tried pistachios myself in bread, but you keep taunting me with your green chock full of nuts recipes so I think it may be time to give it a go upon my return.

I hope to be back in the saddle next week.  I have a lot of catching up to do.

Best.
Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

like the nuts Ian.  This is the best tasting bread we have made this past year in a squeaker or a cats whisker.  The YW is at work with the crumb as you know.  Safe travels back to the ranch!

Glad you liked the bread/

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks....it will be interesting to see if I can revive my YW after 2 weeks away and another week I had it resting in the fridge.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is what we use for the feeding schedule for YW now a days so I think you should be successful in getting it backup to speed.  You just can't get that crumby crumb without YW but a half and half mix with SD isn't too bad either.. Its just more fun that a home baker should have - if there is such a thing :-)

We were going to use some Lithuanian Werewolf beer in some bread but, after buying it, I noticed that it was 10% alcohol and thought that it might too much for the poor yeasties to handle all at once and decided, since it was brewed to stun werewolves, that it would better to just drink it and hope for the best.

Get home safe Ian!

isand66's picture
isand66

I wonder if that werewolf beer would grow some hair on my head?  I hope it tasted as good as it sounds :).

I am leaving this afternoon, traveling back in time arriving home around 7:45 PM Sunday night.

Thanks for your well wishes DA and I look forward to sharing our bread adventures soon.

Regards,
Ian

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Ian,

Since incorporating YW back into my baking schedule I am finding that the stuff is pretty hardy and can tolerate a lot of abuse - not that one would abuse one's YW intentionally.  I wouldn't be surprised if your is still in fine shape.

I keep 2 juice jars of YW.  One made with raisins and one with apples.  They are stored on my refrig. door all the time.  The amount I need is poured from one of the bottles and then left to sit out on the counter overnight before being used in my days leaven build. ( I mix it 50/50 with my sd - something I learned from Mr. D.)  I add fresh water in the amount taken out so the volume of the jars remains more or less constant.

The only maintenance I do is to shake the jars daily and when the fruit begins to look peaked I exchange it for fresh.  Think it gets changed about once every 10 -12 days or so.  If I don't have time to switch out the fruit I give the jars a squirt of honey.  Everyone appears to be happy.  I get nice bubbles when I shake them and the aroma has not turned heavily alcoholic.  Has a fruity aroma....

I am curious to see how yours responds upon your return.  (Mine have never held a grudge due my neglect but who knows about yours..... :-)

Take Care,

Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Janet

your routine sound similar to mine so I would think mine will bounce back just fine after adding some fresh apples and a little agave nectar.

will let you know soon enough!

regars

ian

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Admittedly, I'm not much of a fan of prunes but everything else sounds delicious! I'd like to experiment with malts and sprouted grains, but that'll come another day, sometime in the near or distant future.

Anyway, as always, a good, great, awesome bake. :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

'Zita but after making my apprentices version of Andy's Prune and Brazil nut bread I was hooked.  They don't taste like prune once they are baked and they don't need to be re hydrated.  You can always substitute black figs too if you want that color.

We have been doing a lot of baking and have baked over 100 different kinds of breads this past year - this one tastes the best.  We like the long retard since it can fit in anyone's schedule by adding or subtracting a few hours.  Now we are out of buckwheat groats and barley so it off to Whole Foods to stock up.

Glad you liked the post - Happy baking Zita.