The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Internship in France

tfreese's picture
tfreese

Internship in France

Through a mutual friend I was invited to do a brief internship at a very small bakery, in France.  The bakery has asked me to look into what the French government requirements are.  They have never done this so, they do not know. The length of my visit would be about 3 weeks. So the question is, anyone familiar with the French governments requirements to do this?

Thanks

swiggin's picture
swiggin

When I have done internships in France at other boulangeries it has always been for friends, so I doubt there were any formal proceedings that took place. The boulangerie where I am now hosts stagiaires quite regularly, and the only requirements for us are signing the document stating the boulanger has completed the stage. As long as there is no money being exchanged I would highly suspect that nothing is required to sign by either party (although that could be wrong), as long as you have your passport/visa up to date. Lastly, just to be sure, I would ask the host boulangerie to look into their insurance, as it is the only area I could forsee a problem.If you can't find any better suited information let me know and I can look into it a little more.

 

gerhard's picture
gerhard

I think the insurance end would be what I would be most concerned about.  The health insurance you buy for coverage while out of your country has a lot of exclusions and I would make sure that it doesn't exclude work even if you aren't being paid and don't think it is work the insurance company may view it different.  Insurance companies are pretty heartless if they see a way not to pay a claim they won't pay even if it seems unfair to most observers.  Just a simple stumble can result in serious injury in a small bakery with lots of equipment that has hard sharp corners.  I know that we all feel that won't happen to me but it does happen.

Gerhard

tfreese's picture
tfreese

You stated “signing the document stating the boulanger has completed the stage” What document are you referencing?

Also, if you could check a little more into any potential issue I may face, other than insurance, I would much appreciated it.  Insurance is one issue I’ll have to look into.

Thanks

swiggin's picture
swiggin

I was simply refering to the form that we must sign for the stagaire, indicating they have finished the stage- much like you would do with a type of practicum related to your degree. I asked the others at the boulangerie about what we do for insurance, and it is a little bit more comprehensive as we need to cover more activities at the boulangerie (as we have lots of school groups, paid courses, and wwoofers who come along).  As everyone else has reiterated, the most important thing is covering yourself in case of any accident. Other than that I would simply say that if the boulangerie is affording you the opportunity, and doesn't mind you sitting in and observing/helping, to go and enjoy yourself. I am sorry I don't have any useful information, but this case is a little different that what I am used to. Bon courage. 

patricia hains's picture
patricia hains

Wow, fascinating.  Let me know how things work out.  I have done internships in Italy and Germany.  Now you got me thinking, I will have to see if I can find my way to France now.  Thanks for the idea.

 

Juergen's picture
Juergen

In my opinion, getting a health care insurance which covers possible accidents while you're working in the bakery is the single most important thing. With regards to that, have a look here. Also Eures can provide you with some basic information about staying in a EU country: http://ec.europa.eu/eures/home.jsp?lang=en

gerhard's picture
gerhard

Jürgen the original poster is from the U.S.A. so the European health care plans won't apply.  Most likely they would have to purchase supplementary health insurance for coverage while outside the country.  When selecting a plan I would pay special attention to what the provider excludes coverage for, i.e. accidents occurring in a work place if they are excluded it could turn out to be an expensive learning experience.

Gerhard

patricia hains's picture
patricia hains

I was a student in Germany for two months.  I had to check with my health care provider for coverage.  As it turned out, I did have one trip to the Dr.  I had to pay cash, get a receipt and then my health care provider paid for my Dr. visit once I submitted the receipt.  That worked fine for just a Dr. visit.  So, I would check with your US health provider...By the way, I am so glad you have this opportunity to learn in France.  Yippee!

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

Just call the French embassy or consulate nearest you. They can tell you.

My daughter is working in France right now, for about nine months, and she had to physically travel to the nearest consulate (for her, a flight to San Francisco) to get the proper visas and papers in person. Oddest request was getting her birth certificate translated by an approved and certified translator!

gerhard's picture
gerhard

Don't understand why it would be odd for a government whos working language is French to ask for a translation of submitted documents.  I am sure the American government has the same requirements for documents where the originals are in French.

Gerhard