The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Mostly White Flour SD, and Salt

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Mostly White Flour SD, and Salt

When I first began baking sourdough I followed the experts formulae to the letter. Most prescribed 2% salt. Frankly, I was disappointed with most of the mostly (or entirely) White Flour formulae, especially those that included up to 10% Whole Wheat flour in the mix. They were too bland for our palettes. Along the way I discovered overnight hydration, at cool temperatures, developed both flavor and the desired crumb.

Ultimately, as I continued exploring, my "go to" sourdough is a 10% Whole Rye flour (preferably Hodgson's Mill), 90% White (a 50/50 mix of KA Bread and AP flours), 2% salt, 68% hydration, DT 54°F and 15 hours retarded at 54°F. A typical loaf's flavor is neither Rye nor Wheat but an amalgam, perhaps enhanced by the levain acidity.

Along the same journey, we've come to enjoy the distinct wheatiness, and nutty flavors of overnight retarded baguettes leavened by commercial IDY.

Today I baked two loaves wherein everything was identical to our routine sourdough bakes, except the flour mix was 5% Whole Wheat, and 95% the usual White flour mix. I also upped the salt content to 2.25%. My intent was to achieve a wheaty flavored SD.

The flavor is, as hoped, wheaty; not the in-your-face wheatiness of baguettes but certainly the high note, modulated, softened, by the levain's acidity. All the flavors seem crisper which I attribute to the increased salt.

Coincidentally, I also finished simmering a 5-day-brined corned beef.  I think today's dinner has come together.

David G

 

 

Comments

MichaelH's picture
MichaelH

To say that your dinner came together is indeed an understatement. The translucence of the crumb is remarkable. Congratulations and thanks for sharing this.

Michael

 

linder's picture
linder

Davidg618,

Great bake!  The crumb on the loaves is fantastic.  If that didn't get me salivating, the corned beef sure did.  It must be dinner time!  Dinner is at what time?  Let me know.

Linda

davidg618's picture
davidg618

...I'd email you all a slice--a thin slice, a teaser;-)

David G

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

This looks so tempting, David, them loaves and beef both. I'll be there and I'll be hungry!

davidg618's picture
davidg618

The corned beef's preparation is from "Charcuterie", which you introduced to TFL. And I will be forever grateful you did.

David G

lumos's picture
lumos

What Linda and Hans said....:)

Any chance you could share the recipe for the corned beef, too..........please?

davidg618's picture
davidg618

...in the post just below.

David G

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I'm a stickler for complying with copyright regulations. The recipe for this corned beef is in "Charcuterie" co-authored by food writer Michael Ruhlman and chef Brian Poleyn.

The book was introduced to me on TFL, some time ago, coincidentally, by Hansjoakim whose post on this thread is just above yours.

For any foodie who wants to explore charcuterie I highly recommend this book. In plain, understandable, and common-sensible language they tell the whys and hows of comfits, meat curing and smoking, sausage making, pickling, terrines and pates, and accompanying sauces and sides. Sources for the odd bits are in an appendix.

Here is a reasonable facsimile--the way I used to make corned beef before reading "Charcuterie"--that yields a pretty good corned beef too.

5 lbs fresh beef brisket flat-cut with fat trimmed close.

Brine:
1 gal. chlorine-free water
225g (1 cup) iodine free salt
125g (1/2 cup) sugar

Four Tbls. Pickling Spice (I used McCormick's. Now I use the homemade assembly of spices prescribed in "Charcuterie")

Combine the water, salt and sugar in a pot. Heat it only until all the salt and sugar are completely dissolved. Add half (2 Tbls.) of the Pickling Spice. Cool, and place into the refrigerator; chill.

Place the trimmed brisket in a non-reactive pan, and cover with the chilled brine. The meat will float, so weigh it down with a heavy plate; insure the meat is covered. Cover and place in the refrigerator for four or five days. Check it daily. Even if the weight is keeping it submerged I recommend turning the meat over daily.

After four days (five if the brisket is unusually thick) remove the brisket and rinse it under cool water. Discard the brine. Place the meat in a pot. Cover with water and add the remaining Pickling Spice. Bring just to a boil, reduce the heat to a slow simmer. Cook at a simmer for 3 to 4 hours--until fork tender, turn the brisket over at least once during the simmer.

Serve warm, chilled or room temperature.

Enjoy,

David G

lumos's picture
lumos

Thank you, David. :)

I understand and totally respect your feeling about infringement of copyright.  Sorry for asking such a thing (Didn't know it came from a book) and thank you taking your time to share your recipe with me. Much appreciated.  

  I've only made corned beef a couple of times before, the last time being more than 30 years ago, but your photo definitely gave me a nudge to make it again. It looks really good.  After I posted ealier,  I started searching for a corned beef reciepe o internet.....and I found a recipe by The Mr. Michael Ruhlman himself on his website! :D   Totally unexpected, but it came on the top of the search results, so it certainly seems a very popular recipe. :) 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread and CB isn't bad either.  The bread is about as perfect inside and out as one could wish for so not much else to say.

Nice Baking David

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Likewise, I always check out your postings, and always leave thinking the photos speak for themselves.

David G

Franko's picture
Franko

I have two books that reside permanently on the table beside my desk, both of which I consider equal in terms of clearly explaining the process, recipe reliability, and scope. I've often thought these two should be sold as a box set as they compliment each other so well. I believe it was Hans who tipped me to Ruhlman's Charcuterie as well and like you I'm very grateful to him for doing so.

Both of your breads and your corned beef look fabulous David, very nicely done on both counts! Have you tried Rhulman's Maple Cured Smoked Bacon (Pg-83) yet? If not, beware, it will spoil you for any other kind once you've tried it. Looking forward to seeing more of your charcuterie along with your excellent loaves in posts to come.

All the best,

Franko 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

No haven't tried home-made bacon at all; not because I haven't wanted to, but because I'm having great difficulty finding fresh pork belly, fat back, fresh jowl, etc. I'm willing to buy a half a hog, if I can find an organic pig farmer, but the ones I've found within a hundred miles on the internet either have gone out of business, or only sell conventional cuts, apparently selling shoulder, belly,neck,  back fat and hams  to restaurants or restaurant suppliers. I live in North Central Florida near Ocala and Gainesville, but so far I've failed to make a connection. I asked about fresh fat back in the most highly touted gourmet meat and grocery store in Gainesville, and was directed, not by one but two meat department employees to their salt pork offerings. One seemed highly put out when I informed her I was looking for pork fat that was fresh, and cut from an entirely different part of a hog's anatomy than salt pork made from pork belly trimmings. I then spoke to one of the two managing butchers, who simply told me they were out of it, never offering to special order for me.  Pardon my ranting, but I'm very frustrated trying to find quality ingredients in this area. I haven't given up. I'm going to an Ocala farmer's market Thursday to see what is offered, and ask around if they know of any organic pig farmers, but my expectations are low.

I agree with you on both books: my copies occupy space an a very small bookshelf in my kitchen, sharing the space with only three others:

You will note Salumi, also co-authored by Ruhlman and Polcyn.  Salumi is my next focus in my lifelong passion with foods.  I own approximately 100 food related books, but these few are always immediately at hand.  I confess Inside the Jewish Bakery also has a spot on the shelf because I love to boast to friends and guests I was a test baker--one of approximately a thousand TFLers ;-) --during its pre-publishing days, and two of my photographs are in the first edition.

I attended a class in September at the John C. Campbell Folk School where, in one week, we reduced a whole hog to cured hams, bacon, head cheese, pates, sausages, roasts, mortadella, lardo, and a few other goodies with Italian names I can't spell.  I now share Emeril Lagasse's love-affair with pork fat: all kinds.

Happy Bakings and Porkrenderings,

David G

 

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi David,

Much as I'd like a copy of Salumi, at this point in time I wouldn't be able to make much use of it since I don't have space for a curing cabinet other than in the garage. Not exactly the environment I want for fermenting sausages, or hanging meat while curing. I may have to build a shed in the backyard if I ever expect to get into the more advanced methods of charcuterie but for now I'm enjoying what I can do with fresh sausages, confit, pate etc. I know the frustration you mention of trying to source some of the cuts of pork needed. In our town I have only the supermarket butchers to try and get some of the things I need. One of the stores is pretty good about ordering for me and occasionally I'll find some pure pork fat in their freezer section that they've saved from breaking down a whole hog for a special order. Pork bellies or sides I can usually get, but hogs head for headcheese or jowls for guanciale so far has eluded me. I'm envious of the course you took, I'd love to do something similar if the opportunity comes along. I read on Rhulman's twitter feed last year of him trying fresh pork fat, still warm from the hog that he and another fellow butchered for a demo. He said it was amazing and not at all what he'd expected it to taste like, referring to it as hog sushi as I recall. Another book you might want to have a look at is "The Art of Charcuterie" by John Kowalski and the CIA. It's written as a text book, very much like AB&P by Suas is and has some outstanding recipes in it in case you haven't seen it already.

All the best David, and wishing you good luck with sourcing your ingredients.

Franko

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Hi, David:

Both your bread and your corned beef look delicious!  I'm going to follow Lumos's link to the recipe and give it a try.  For pork belly, you'll most likely find it in Asian grocery stores and we use it for roast pork, the one with the very crispy skin.  However, it may not be organic, if that's what you want.  BTW, my son says your bookends are very cute!

Yippee

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Hi, Yippee,

There's a large Asian grocery in nearby Gainsville. I'll give it a try.

I looked at the recipe, it's exactly the same. I didn't include the aromatics because I make it primarily for sandwiches.  If you're comfortable using pink salt (sodium nitrate) and have it, I recommend using it. It does add distinctive flavor. 

Regards,

David G

 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

David:

I like the color of your corned beef and I plan to use pink salt.  Where did you get yours from?

Yippee

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I've been buying supplies from www.sausagemaker.com Charcuterie also lists www.butcher-packer.com. I think I ordered from them the last time I bought pink salt. Both are reliable sources.

David G

Yippee's picture
Yippee

for a one-pound Insta Cure #1.

Thanks.

 

Yippee

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Hi, David:

Both your bread and your corned beef look delicious!  I'm going to follow Lumos's link to the recipe and give it a try.  For pork belly, you'll most likely find it in Asian grocery stores and we use it for roast pork, the one with the very crispy skin.  However, it may not be organic, if that's what you want.  BTW, my son says your bookends are very cute!

Yippee

Yippee's picture
Yippee

I've ever had!    The entire family loves it!   Makes a supreme sandwich! Thank you, David and Lumos, for bringing it to my attention! I'd recommend it to everyone!

Yippee

varda's picture
varda

of your bread making process.   Your loaves look just excellent.   What a wonderful meal you must have had.  -Varda

davidg618's picture
davidg618

I'm finally comfortable with three breads we consume routinely: baguettes, challah, and sourdoughs. My wife fills out the list with  bread machine mixed sandwich white or whole wheat. While we still bake our daily bread--we haven't bought a commercial loaf for more than a decade--food in general is a passion with me; currently, I'm holding bread baking in stasis (with only the ocassional excursion into new lands) while I play with other edibles. Nonetheless, bread baking is always a pleasure.

Thanks for the thumbs up.

David G