The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

No! Really? Fungi zapper!

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Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

No! Really? Fungi zapper!

abbygirl's picture
abbygirl

I don't like this idea at ALL! Not that I ever buy store bread anymore...between that and frankinfish....jeesh...

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

a pocket held version.  I got a closet of shoes that seem susceptible to mold.   I could zap and bag them between seasons.  

wally's picture
wally

So we can sleep soundly knowing that our VERY STALE bread is mold free, huh, Mimi!

Larry

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Wally...  slipped on the key board?   

60 days stale sounds so strange.   Would that loaf be moist and crumbly?  

Would flavour inprove?  

Would we have year dates on our bread like wine?  

What about adding new terms:  "bag aged bread"  or "new aged bread"  or  "aged in season"   what about "seasonally aged at harvest time."   

  

dsadowsk's picture
dsadowsk

I'm always suspicious of devices like this. Usually they don't work as advertised.

 

Here's a link for those who don't like Fox News: http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2013/jan/08/mold-free-bread-microwave-keeps-bread-fungus-bay-c/

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

News or not liking Fox News have to do with this story? 

dsadowsk's picture
dsadowsk

However, folks I know don't like giving pageviews to Fox, so I provided a different place to see the story. I could, however, have been more diplomatic about it.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

about it, they just don't want it used on them.  Spores are pretty tough little beasties to kill.  I wonder what would happen if one ran a starter thru the machine, would it kill yeasts and bacteria as well?  Could some starter invaders be prevented?

I just passed on the info as I recieved it.  It just happened to be on Fox news.   Do you suppose avoiding preservatives and chemicals is a step in the right direction?

dsadowsk's picture
dsadowsk

But I'm waiting to see a demonstration that the thing works as advertised, on a commercial scale, day in and day out. The industrial bakeries create so many loaves, and they have a stake in each one to not get moldy early. Preservatives are an histoerical, proven and cheap means of retarding mold, and most people don't raise a fuss about them. If I were, say, Arnold Bakery, what would motivate me to switch to this new technology?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and wrapped properly, it will not spoil for longer than anyone is willing to test it.  It might also glow bright enough in the dark too,  saving us from having to use electricity as night and help save the planet from global warming or worse - us :-)

EvaB's picture
EvaB

Who wants to eat 60 day old bread, if you want it that long, put it in the freezer! May not be the most convenient way but it sure won't be mouldy!

I think 90% of the mould problem is the humidity and the fact that bread is bagged in plastic these days, and people want to have conveience over storage, its easier to store the bread in a plastic bag, stick it in the humid fridge over putting it in a bread box and slicing it as needed. Personally Irarely have bread in the house, and when I do it moulds because I can't eat it fast enough to get rid of it!

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

Full of self infatuation I checked out Fox News! Gave them a hit shekel though the second-source sourced the Fox News source. Which gives Fox the top hit - anyway...,

The company, MicroZap, is also working on zapping MRSA but has apparently run into difficulties with their patent application.  Looks like they're on a fishing expedition for additional capital and are making up reasons for a market to exist.

Wondeirng what the tradeoff in power required to zap the bread versus the cost of preservatives?...,

Wild-Yeast

 

 

EvaB's picture
EvaB

the original application.

But it makes me wonder what exactly the machine to zap the MRSA looks like, does it only zap soft stuff like sheets, does it do mattresses, how about the whole bed frame (problem with metal there) and so forth. While I think the idea has some merit, it doesn't address the problem as a whole, and proper washing with a killer soap (lye works fine) would be better, and washing all the time, not just once a day, once a week or whatever they seem to do. I know that the hospitals in our Province could benefit from someone actually washing the floor on their hands and knees, getting into the corners and crevices. Not to mention just keeping the rooms cleaner. The problem is a whole lot of people don't want to work that hard, and anyone who will take what most people see as a menial job for what most people again see as downright terrible wages get sloppy and don't do more than swipe a dirty mop over the floor and hope that it passes.

This problem isn't only in the hospitals of the country, but also the resturants, the fast food stores, the stores period. If you look in the rest rooms of any of these places, the high water mark of dirty mop marks on the wall, the grime in the cracks around the bottom of the room is enough to make you never go back again. What are they going to do, build the Zapper around the whole building and empty it out every so often and zap the whole thing???

Juergen's picture
Juergen

This seems to be another of those 'solutions' to non-existing problems. Reasonably fresh in-store baked bread can be bought at almost any supermarket these days so mold really shouldn't be an issue at all. And those loaves that are not made in-store but in one of those large factories, still have a production date on the bag so one can pick out a 'fresh' loaf and put it in freezer at home.

Also, all of those commercially produced loaves, whether baked in-store or at a large factory, are all loaded with preservatives which significantly delay the forming of mold anyway. In my opinion, mold is really only a problem for those who buy old bread to save a couple of cents (and those people shouldn't complain anyway because they only get what they pay for). 

Thanks for posting this Mini, I do have to give credit to MicroZap for their ingenuity.