The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

DLX Assistent mixer speeds and times

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

DLX Assistent mixer speeds and times

Lately I've been trying to codify the variables of mixing and kneading dough in my DLX. Since it seems to act as a spiral mixer would, I used that as my base. Spiral mixers run at   about 100RPM in first speed, and 200RPM in second; that's the hook rotational speed. Bowl speed is more on the order of 15RPM. Commercial spiral mixers that I've checked use separate motors for each.

The DLX has a spiral pattern roller that depends on the bowl's rotation to drive it. The  bowl's speed is adjustable from ~45 to 135RPM. The ratio of the roller's and the bowl's radii acts as a step-up gear to raise the roller's speed.

Depending on the amount of flour, a proxy for the total dough, the roller runs at ~95 to 135RPM with the bowl running its dead slowest. So, speed 1 is decided for you.

For speed 2, the effective ratio is computed and the desired bowl speed is set to drive the roller at 200RPM. The bowl's effective radius is reduced by the amount of spacing between the roller and the bowl's rim.

The speed setting dial has eight little blocks. My nomenclature is simply the number of complete blocks, starting below the first, at zero, i.e. dead slow. Thus, a speed of 4 means turned up through the first four blocks, right into the space between the fourth and fifth blocks. Speed 3½ would be in the center of the fourth block.

Here is the chart of my speed settings and mixing times.

Flour weightRoller spacingBowl speed dial settingMix time @ speed 1Knead time @ speed 2
Speed 1Speed 2LightImprovedIntensive
560g or less½ in0½2 to 3 min3 to 4 min5min8+ min
561g to 980g1 in2
981g to 1960g1½ in4
1961g to 3220g2 in6

I am hoping other DLX users will give these values a test run or three, and add your findings to the conversation. I have found the times and speeds to be very close to values described by Hamelman, Suas, et al. For users of other mixers, do yours have a similar pattern?

I look forward to some input on this.

cheers,

gary

Comments

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Gary,

I am impressed.  I have a DLX and can't say I have taken the time to figure out specifics.  I just watch the dough and how it is 'behaving'.  

Find that hydration plays a part in how far from the side I set my roller but a big factor is the amount of time I allow my dough to rest after it has been roughly combined.  I generally allow my doughs to sit 60 or more minutes before kneading to the gluten development I am seeking.  I will use the hook on doughs that firmer and I tend to run at lower speeds mostly.  I do not time how long I knead because I am generally making dinner, feeding dogs, washing up dishes and doing general end of day pick up as my dough goes through it's routine.  Depending on how my evening is going I will sometimes elect to use S&Fs to develop the gluten after the initial mix.

So I guess I don't have much input along the lines you are seeking here but am curious to see what others have to say and to add to your findings. ;-)

Janet

 

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

I had meant to mention hydration, and am glad you brought it up. If I'm at the upper end of the weight bracket, I'll open the spacing a bit for stiffer doughs. Inversely, I'll close the gap a bit for slack doughs at the lower end of the weight bracket.

I attacked the issue because while I usually make enriched sandwich loaves, which will withstand a whole lot of gluten development (see txfarmer), I was consistently overworking lean doughs. A first approximation of the numbers, compared to spiral mixers (which most agree the DLX emulates) told me I was wa-ay over-kneading. So …

cheers,

gary

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Gary,

The lean doughs are the ones I simply mix, autolyze and then mix only a bit but then finish off with S&F as they come together very quickly during the time I have them at room temp. prior to being bulk fermented in the refrig. overnight. They are mixed on low which is how I mix most of mine anyway....no rush in my kitchen :-)

I love this mixer because it is so versitile with the hook attachment and the roller coupled with the adjustable speeds.  So much nicer than the Bosch Universal I used to use.

Janet

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

I'd probably do well to not even fire the DLX up for lean breads; force of habit. But, for the clock-watching and total time, I prefer to do an improved mix and then bulk ferment in the fridge*. For that, I do like the mixer. Getting the speeds computed for the proper spacing has gotten me into the ballpark. More importantly, it provides a basis point for dealing with dough variables.

cheers,

gary

* For a sourdough, as an example, it adds about an hour to the final proof time as the shaped dough warms to room temp, but it knocks 2½hrs off my attention time for the S&F and ferment at the front. ~gt