The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

My second loaf, still not fluffy

sunnspot9's picture
sunnspot9

My second loaf, still not fluffy

My second attempt at a (mostly) whole wheat sourdough, I decided it might be easier for me if I exchanged some white flour and some bread flour for some of the WW flour.  I used JMONKEY's suggestions, I did one stretch and fold during the long rise, and did the final rise at 80-85 degrees. I think the result is better, but still not very fluffy.  I mixed the ingredients in the bowl by hand and folded it (in the bowl) a few times to try to incorporate the dry ingredients that seemed to lay under the dough. I hand kneaded for 12 minutes, and let it rise for around 6 hours, preshaped, and then final shape. final rise was around 90 min. baked at 375 for ? 35ish minutes.

Juergen noted on my first attempt that the crumb looks dry, but it tastes super moist, maybe too moist, is a lack of water keeping the dough from fluffing?

sournewb71's picture
sournewb71

I'm no expert but I'd suggest:

1) Increase the hydration, try 72-75%.

2) Autolyse the flour and water for atleast an hour before adding salt or kneading.

 

sunnspot9's picture
sunnspot9

Thanks for the help!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

"stretch and folds."  This is a good thing.  Even if you stick to the same hydration, this might solve many problems.  A finer crumb might be the "fluff" you're looking for.  That would mean more folding during the 5-6 hrs so the gas is evenly trapped and distributed.  

The tear and fold marks on the side tells me something with shaping could be done differently.  

Anytime a switch is made from white flour for whole wheat, there is a greater risk of the bran in the ww flour cutting the gluten and reducing the fluff in the loaf.  A longer autolyse helps soften the ww bran so it is not as sharp.  A good reason not use ww with bran flecks for bench flour.  

Maybe letting the dough rise until it is fuller before baking.   I also think the oven could be hotter, closer to 400°F.  

sunnspot9's picture
sunnspot9

Thanks Mini,

How do I solve the shaping/tearing issue?

This is originally a 100% whole wheat recipe, which calls for a 6-24 long rise as an "autolyse" so should I try a longer long rise, or presoak the flour (isn't that also called an autolyse?) As you already know, I am super-newbie at breadmaking. :) thanks for your help. I wish you lived down the street, I need a bread mentor :D

Sunnie

sournewb71's picture
sournewb71

Autolyze is not the same thing as bulk proofing, or final proofing or rise time.  It is when you mix the flour, water, and starter if its liquid (if your starter is stiff, you usually don't include it unless your dough hydration is high) and leave it rest for a given period of time before you add salt and knead.  

sunnspot9's picture
sunnspot9

thank you  sournewb71 I will do that next time, along with more stretch and folds, should I add the honey and molasses with the salt then?

AHA! I just had an aha moment, this must be why the sourdough english muffins turn out so well, I've made them with 50% WW and 50% white, I realize that it's also a different cooking method, but they end up nice and fluffy.

I wondered why the methods were different (mix, wait, mix, knead, rise, cook vs mix, knead, wait, shape, rise, cook--supersimplified) now I have a tiny bit of understanding THANK YOU!!! :D

sorry for the re-edits, typo's n such

grind's picture
grind

I've never tried it myself, but I read that a roux promotes a fluffier crumb.  There's probably a thread somewhere on the Forum.