The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Brioce help

cascadediver's picture
cascadediver

Brioce help

hey there everybody. So I have this awesome recipe for brioche and last night I decided to make it but feeling very daring I also decided to double the butter. The bread rose amazingly and I knocked it down and formed it into braids. After that I expected it to rise again before I put it in the oven however it did not raise. Is this because I altered the recipe to much and the yeast cannot handle that amount of butter? I'm really stumped here. Can anyone shed some light here?

Thanks for the help

-by the way, I'm sorry for all the miss-spellings

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I doubt that your issue originated with the amount of butter you used.  Brioche formulas vary from about 25% to 80+% butter.  Assuming that the Brioche you're making is built on a sponge, it is true, however, that as the amount of butter increases the percentage of yeast also increases, but not dramatically.  Typically by no more than about .5% variance in the sponge over the range of the amount of butter used used in the bread.

IMO it was the punch down of the dough that caused your problem.  My approach to Brioche includes overnight fermentation in the refrigerator the shaping it when it comes out of the fridge and one rise prior to loading it into the oven.

cascadediver's picture
cascadediver

yes, that very well could be it, too much handling, thanks. Now even though thd bread did not rise the second time it did produce a very dense and amazingly tasting bread, maybe somthing better used for dessert than with dinner.

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

I do think that doubling the butter is bound to have an effect on the dough.  You  may need to increase yeast slightly and switch to a stronger flour, like bread flour, if you want to use that much butter and still maintain a high rise and light texture.  The yeast need to have the carbon dioxide pressed out in order to function properly, so I wouldn't eliminated the de-gassing.  Was the dough warm for the first rise and then cold for the final proof?  The solidification of the butter and the cooler temp may have made it that much harder for the yeast to work, both because the butter was hard and because the yeast work so much more slowly at cool temps.  

cascadediver's picture
cascadediver

the I am currently using bread flour. I'm sure the temp had a lot to do with it as well. the dough was slightly warmer during the first rise. the solitifide butter would make it difficult for the yeast to make the bread rise. I think I'm going to buy a small heater and warm up my pantry so i have better controlled temp where I'm going to have the bread rise.