The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Type 55 flour equivalent

Barbara Krauss's picture
Barbara Krauss

Type 55 flour equivalent

In the second volume of Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking (pages 112-113) she says that you can obtain the American equivalent to French type 55 flour by combining 2 parts pastry flour (not cake flour) to 1 part unbleached all purpose flour. This produces a flour with 8 to 9 per cent protein, which she says is best for baguettes.  I want to try this, but I'd first like to know if anyone else has done this, and with what success. 

Thanks, Barbara

flank steak's picture
flank steak

I read your question a little while ago and wanted to know the answer too! But no one had any advice, so I went and tried it today, and truly it works. I did my experiment a little differently though. I used two parts of locally grown soft winter wheat at about 8- 8.5% protein and one part of locally grown spring wheat at a very high protein content--too high for my likes to bake bread with. That's why I was interested in your question, because I wanted to work with a softer type flour myself.  I had great oven spring and very nice ears etc. Oh and I baked with a sourdough starter, no yeast. Have not cut it open yet but I am dying to, mix of curiosity and hunger... I say, try it if you haven't already.

Cheers

Barbara Krauss's picture
Barbara Krauss

Hi Flank Steak,

Thanks for your feedback. I also tried it, but I used a straight formula with yeast instead of my sourdough. I liked the feel of the dough, and I thought I got a good proof out of it, but mine didn't quite open up in the oven to the extent that you've described. However, I fault my technique and not the flour! I'll definitely try it again.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

Barbara