The Fresh Loaf

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Cream Cheese Egg White Sourdough Miche

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isand66's picture
isand66

Cream Cheese Egg White Sourdough Miche


I based this recipe loosely on an old yeast based recipe I had created many years ago which always came out nice and light and moist.  I wanted to make a nice light and airy sourdough loaf using whipped egg whites and cream cheese for a nice flavorful texture.  I like to think my bread making is much more sophisticated now than 15 years ago when I first made this recipe.  Back then I was not into sourdough yet and had just graduated from the bread maker to a Kitchen Aid stand mixer.  Now, I prefer bread that has layers of flavor and a nice chewy crust.

In order to accomplish my goal of a light and airy bread but with a nice crust and layers of flavor I used wheat germ, malted wheat flakes and oat flour to give the finished product a nice nutty flavor.  I used a combination of French style flour and European style flour from KAF along with some white rye and potato flour as well as some raspberry balsamic vinegar.

I have to say the end result was exactly what I was hoping for and more.  The crust is perfect with a nice airy open crumb and the taste is nice and nutty but light.  The malted wheat flakes add a nice element in the crumb as well.

This is a perfect bread for just about anything so I hope you give it a try.

I used my standard 65% AP starter for this recipe.

Directions

AP Starter

227 grams AP Flour

71 grams AP Seed Starter

151 grams Water at Room Temperature (80-90 degrees F.)

Mix ingredients in a bowl until thoroughly combined.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for around 8 hours.  The starter should almost double when ready to proceed.  You can either mix in final dough or put in refrigerator for at most 1 day before using.  If your kitchen is warmer than mine which is usually about 70-72 degrees with my air-conditioning you can proceed sooner.

Main Dough Ingredients

425 grams Refreshed AP Starter (65% hydration) from above

150 grams European Style Flour (KAF, you can substitute bread flour with a little whole wheat mixed in)

50 grams Wheat Germ

200 grams French Style Flour (KAF, you can substitute AP flour if necessary)

50 grams Oat Flour (KAF)

50 grams White Rye Flour (KAF)

65 grams Potato Flour

40 grams Malted Wheat Flakes

224 grams Softened Cream Cheese (1 Package)

132 grams Egg Whites (4 large eggs)

25 grams Raspberry Balsamic Vinegar

16 grams Seas Salt or Table Salt

343 grams Water at Room Temperature

Procedure

In the bowl of your mixer using your beater attachment whip the egg whites on the highest speed until stiff peaks are formed.  Set aside while you mix the main dough below.

Mix the flours, and malted wheat flakes and wheat germ with the water in your mixer or by hand for 1 minute.   Next fold in the egg whites by hand and let it rest covered in your bowl for 20-30  minutes.   Next cut the starter into small pieces and add to the flour mixture in the bowl and also add the oil, salt, cream cheese and vinegar.  Mix for 4 minute to incorporate all the ingredients. I mixed on speed #1 for 3 minutes and speed #2 for 1 minutes.   Note this is a very wet dough but resist the urge to add too much flour as you don't want the dough to become too stiff.

Next take the dough out of the bowl and place it in an oiled bowl or container.  Do a stretch and fold and rest the dough uncovered for 20 minutes.  After the rest do another stretch and fold and cover the dough and let it rest for 10 minutes.  Do one more stretch and fold and put the dough into a lightly oiled bowl and let it sit at room temperature covered for 2 hours (if it is already in a bowl just make sure to cover it).   (Note: since this dough is very wet, I did 2 extra stretch and folds in the bold and one additional one right before putting it in the refrigerator).  After 2 hours you can put the dough into the refrigerator for 24 hours or up to 2 days before baking.    I baked the bread about 24 hours later.

The next day (or when ready to bake) let the dough sit out at room temperature for 2  hours.

Next, form the dough into your desired shape and put them in floured bannetons, bowls or on a baking sheet and let them rise covered for 2 hours or until they pass the poke test.  Just make sure to not let them over-rise.

I made one large boule and used a basket with a floured linen liner.

When read to bake, score the loaf as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

Set your oven for 500 degrees F. at least 45 minutes before ready to bake.  When ready to bake place the loaves into your on  your oven stone with steam and lower the temperature immediately to 450 degrees.    When both loaves are golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 200 degrees F. you can remove them from the oven.  Since this was one large loaf it took about 55 minutes to bake.  (Note: since I made one large Miche I had to lower the temperature to around 425 degrees F. with about 20 minutes to go so the crust would not get too dark).

Let the loaves cool down for at least an 3 hours or so before eating as desired.

 

Comments

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Wonderful looking loaf.  It sounds great.

-F

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Floyd.

Appreciate your comment.

Regards,

Ian

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Very adventurous Ian!  I would have never thought to put those ingredients in bread, but it does make sense as a nice flavour combination.

I am looking forward to the time where I am confident enough with basic bread baking that I can start adding all sorts of fun stuff in the dough like you do.

Keep up the great inspiring baking!

John

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks John.

Keep baking and don't be afraid to try new things.  The worse thing that can happen is a doorstop or a bread crumb loaf!

Regards,
Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

slash sure looks like a whale to me.  How you got a straight line to bloom into a whale shape needs to be trade marked and copyrighted quickly!  You really got a nice cracked crust on this miche and the the crumb is open too with somuch going on inside..  You said the bough was wet  - did you calculate the hydration?

You always come up with these wonderful formulas that get me thinking in odd and strange bread ways - not that you or I need much help in those regards :-)

After you spend all that time whipping the egg whites to stiff peaks, don't they deflate when mixed with the dough in the KA for 4 minutes?  I love small amounts of rye, potato and oats in bread and think they really help the lift (oat and potato) and flavor (rye).   I've actually had oat and potato bread just explode out of the tin more times than not.  I usually only fill them 1/3 full trying to compensate.  I've got an extra brick of cream cheese that won't be going on bagels or in a cheese cake.

I've got a huge batch of multi-grain sprouts going (spelt, rye, bulgar, ww, quinoa, barley and kamut - 60 g each) and was going to make a combo YW /SD levain tonight to bake something with it on Wednesday and dry the rest for some more red and white malt.  I've gone to French slap and folds when KA mixing and kneading is specified to keep up the training for Michael Wilson's Holiday Panettone.    Just think what slapping them around for 15 minutes will do for deflating egg whites :-)  Slap and fplds really work well for wet doughs and you can follow them up with some S&F's if it is needed.

So how much water is in sour cream anyway?

Nice baking Ian!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA...I will get right on the patent application for the whale slash!

You may be right in that folding the egg whites in after the 4 minute mix would probably work even better.  Will have to try that next time.

I have not calculated the hydration on this one as I have to figure out how to compensate for the egg whites.  They really do make the dough much more wet.  I will see if I can figure it out tonight and let you know.  I did all the S&F's in the container which I find easiest when the dough is so wet.

Do try adding some cream cheese to one of your breads.  I think you will like the end result.

For some reason even though I added no sugar in this, the bread smelled very sweet and tasted very nutty.

I seldom do much kneading any more and usually just do S&F's as I find it helps with a more open crumb.

Look forward to your next bake.


Thanks for your comments as always.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

egg whites are 75% water and the cream cheese is 25% water.  That would put you right at 80% hydration.  Not too bad considering that the cream cheese will set up pretty good in the fridge and take some of the slack out of the dough:-)

I consider the slap and folds to replace the KA mixing and they put air bubbles into the dough.  Plus the apprentice goes crazy running around barking when she hears the slaps on the counter and that alone is worth it :-)

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA...that sounds about right.

I think my cats would probably run away in terror if I did the slap and fold, either that or they may call the police claiming I am abusing them by not feeding them on time...

varda's picture
varda

and came out so nicely.    I love the color of the crust.   -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Varda.  Appreciate the comment.  This one came out very tasty.  Hope you made out okay in the storm.

Regards,
Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Cream cheese, egg whites, and what not.. You don't seem to keep any leftovers in your fridge, Ian! Your wife must be delighted.

I'll have to be more daring, and add whatever ingredients are in my fridge, the idea of using cream cheese is just appropriate , as i have some unused in the fridge for quite some time.

I love the color of the crust, and the open crumb. well done!

I'm on the mend now, and God willing, should be heading back home in a few days.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for the comment Khalid.

My wife hates leftovers actually so it works out great! 

I do like the way the crust and crumb came out on this one and it has a nice rich flavor but nice and light if that makes any sense.

Glad to hear you will be going home soon.

Wish you a all the best and look forward to when you can bake yourself soon enough.

Regards,
Ian

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Ian.  What does the cream cheese do to the bread?  Texture?  Flavour?  Is it prominent?

John

Mebake's picture
Mebake

thanks for the well wishes, Ian.

I've dried up my starters, and will freeze them soon.  Too bad I wouldn't dare do any baking for months at least.. my priority now is my back.

Iam now back home, and will be watching your lovely posts. Keep the baking running, and your back safe. 

I also truly hope you wind up in a better, more stable career.

All the best,

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Kahlid.

I'm sure your starters are going to be well rested and raring to go once you recuperate enough to start baking again.

I'm off to North Carolina for our annual visit with my wife's family for Thanksgiving.

I'm going to bring my starter with me this trip and make some bread and rolls for the big dinner.

Regards,
Ian

isand66's picture
isand66

John,

It tends to make the crumb more tender and does add a slight creamy flavor.  It is hard to describe exactly but it really did make a difference in this bake.