The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Convert dry yeast recipe to one of the starters

Carol Bergeron's picture
Carol Bergeron

Convert dry yeast recipe to one of the starters

I have a recipe for an herbed focaccia that I have been making for several years that calls for dry yeast.  I have purchased several starters which are all doing well and I would like to convert the original recipe from dry yeast to one of my starters.  Does any one have a method for doing this?

Here is the recipe that I would like to convert:

2 1/2 tsp active dry yeast

1/2 cup warm water

1 1/2 cups milk

6 Tbsp olive oil

5 cups all purpose flour

2 tsp salt

fresh herbs and coarse salt

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

to convert commercial yeast to SD is to use the 30% rule that I am making up right now :-)  Your 5 cups of flour weigh about 70o g or about 24.5 oz.  You want a levain that weighs about 30% of that total or around 210 g or 7.5 oz or so.  if you build a 100 % hydration levain then half would be flour and half would be liquid.  In your case you could chose water or milk for the liquid but I would use half and half just for fun. 

So use 105 g of flour and 105 g or liquid (3.25 oz of each) and use 10% of the levain weight, in this case 20 g  (now 230 g total )or .7 oz of starter (now 8.2 oz).  Mix it all together and if it doubles in 6 hours it is ready to go.  If not feed the levain again by taking half of it, tossing the other half (or use for something else) and build the levain back to its  230 g size and use it when it doubles.

Just remember to deduct the flour and water used for the levain build from the totals in your recipe when you make the dough to keep all the water and flour the same.

This method seems to work well for me for just about any conversion.

butterflyblue's picture
butterflyblue

Just recently ran across this page on converting recipes to sourdough at Sourdough home.  Seems nice and easy, but I haven't tried it yet.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Dabrownman, you are a well of wisdom, or, as we Mainahs say "wicked smaht"!
I'll copy this right away in my baking infos.

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

up my recent ability to add a certain nothingness, that is totally un-useful on just about any subject whatsoever, to a total and complete Hemp Seed addiction.   Perhaps I am just old and slipping mentally too - after having developed a limp I blame on excess Chia seeds. 

You can use the 20 or 25 % rule to start with too and use 10% of that for starter seed but the end result will take longer to ferment and develop the lump of dough with the less less amouint of levain.  It will possibly be less sour - or more sour  if  a very small seed is used like our 1g starter experiments point to - where 1 g of starter is used for 60g of flour and 40 of water it might well take it 24 hours for the levain to double on the counter.  It will also take longer to ferment the 700 gram lump on the counter too but the sour will really be there in the end using 1 g of starter and waiting a long time for it to do its work.

You just have to remember to deduct the flour and water used in the levain  from the commercial yeast recipe for the dough flour and water.  Works every time but the time to make a loaf a bread vary. It you know what your timing will be then you can pick the % method that works the best for it.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

You make me always smile, Dabrownman!

No more baking for the next two weeks - we are flying to Mexico - though I am tempted to take one dry bread mix, to have a respite from all the tasteless white stuff.

Hasta la vista,

Karin

 

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Buen viaje - y no come el pan!

Carol Bergeron's picture
Carol Bergeron

Thanks for the help.  I'm still working on getting it right but am getting alot closer.  Good thing I have alot of friends and neighbors that like bread even if it isn't perfect.  I'm keeping notes and will post when I get it right.