The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

When preparing focaccia, what does "dimpling" mean?

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

When preparing focaccia, what does "dimpling" mean?

Today was the first time I made focaccia... It was an utter disaster (very soggy and salty), but that's a different story...

What does "dimpling" mean? It was only after baking my focaccia did I realize that I may have handled my dough incorrectly. What I did was, I gouged my fingertips into the dough, touching the bottom of the sheet pan. How deep should my fingertips go into the dough when dimpling, providing that the dough is about an inch or less high? 

In addition to that, I popped the large bubbles emerging from the surface of the dough. Is it necessary to pop the bubbles or can I leave them?

Thanks for any help! :) 

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

You answered your own question.  Dimpling means pressing your fingers into the dough to create 'dimples.'  Sounds like you did this step.  You should not press down all the way to the pan as this could rip holes into the dough.  You don't have to pop the bubbles, especially if they are not see through.  This will deflate the dough.

John

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

:) Thank you for clarifying. Very much appreciated. Next time I'll be more gentler with my dough.

Zita 

Breadandwine's picture
Breadandwine

Hi bakingbadly (Great name, but you'll have to change it, soon, I'll bet! ;) )

Here's my recipe and method. I don't press my fingers all the way through when I'm dimpling - but they still leave a mark underneath the loaf  - as you'll see from the pic. It's great fun making this bread, don't you think?

http://nobreadisanisland.blogspot.co.uk/2011/03/gg.html

About the bubbles - sounds like you may have an over-active dough if you're getting bubbles on top of the loaf. If it happens again, why not burst a couple - and leave some untouched, and see which way you prefer. Never be afraid to experiment and try your own ideas. Bread is such a forgiving medium - you can get away with a lot!

Every time you make a loaf, you'll learn - so never stop baking!

Best wishes, Paul

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

That is an interesting effect! I was genuinely surprised at the dimple marks on the bottom of your focaccia. Makes me very curious...

Anyway, thank you for your helpful tips and suggestions. Next time I won't press my fingertips all the way through. And you're absolutely right. Bread is very forgiving and I shouldn't be afraid to experiment. :)

Thanks again!

Zita