The Fresh Loaf

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Hurricane Yeast Water Sourdough Corn Rye Bread

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isand66's picture
isand66

Hurricane Yeast Water Sourdough Corn Rye Bread

The storm is upon us as I try to write this post before losing power.  Hurricane Sandy is set to touch down in a few hours but already the wind is howling and the water is starting to rise over the docks on Long Island.

I baked this rye bread yesterday in preparation for possibly not having any bread or water for a while. Fortunately it came out as good as I could hope with the addition of a corn slurry added which added some nice moisture to the overall bread.

I built up a yeast water starter using white rye and pumpernickel flour in two builds and also used some of my existing AP sourdough starter as well.

Directions for Yeast Water Levain

Yeast Water Starter Build 1

40 grams White Rye Flour (KAF)

40 grams Pumpernickel Flour (KAF)

80 grams Yeast Water Starter

Mix the flour and Yeast Water in a bowl until thoroughly combined.  Cover the bowl and let it sit at room temperature for around 4 hours.  The starter should almost double when ready to proceed to build 2.

Build 2

Add ingredients below to starter from above and mix until incorporated.  Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 4 hours.

100 grams Pumpernickel Flour

100 grams Yeast Water Starter

Main Dough Ingredients

345 grams Rye Starter from above

80 grams AP Sourdough Levain Refreshed (65% Hydration)

305 grams First Clear Flour (KAF)

75 grams Potato Flour (Bob's Red Mill)

100 grams Pumpernickel Flour (KAF)

85 grams Corn Flour (Bob's Red Mill)

50 grams Rye Chops

141 grams Corn Slurry (1 small can of corn put in food processor for about 30 seconds, water drained before processing)

22 grams Pistachio Oil (You can sub Olive Oil or Vegetable Oil or any nut oil)

18 grams Seas Salt or Table Salt

350 grams Water at Room Temperature

Procedure

Mix the starters (levains) with the water to break them up in your mixer or by hand.  Next mix the flours, and rye chops with the starters in your mixer or by hand for 1 minute. Let it rest covered in your bowl for 20-30  minutes.   Next  add the oil, salt, and the corn slurry mix for 4 minute to incorporate all the ingredients. I mixed on speed #1 for 3 minutes and speed #2 for 1 minutes.   The dough should have come together in a ball and will be pretty sticky from the high percentage of rye flour.

Next take the dough out of the bowl and place it an oiled bowl or container.  Do a stretch and fold and rest the dough for 30 minutes.  After the rest do another stretch and fold and cover the dough and let it rest for 30 minutes.  Do one more stretch and fold and let it sit at room temperature covered for 2 hours.  After 2 hours you can put the dough into the refrigerator for 24 hours or up to 2 days before baking.  Feel free to do some additional S & F's if you feel it is necessary.  I baked the bread about 24 hours later.

The next day (or when ready to bake) let the dough sit out at room temperature for 2  hours.

Next, form the dough into your desired shape and put them in floured bannetons, bowls or on a baking sheet and let them rise covered for 2 hours or until they pass the poke test.  I used my baker's couche to let the batards rise.  Just make sure to not let them over-rise.  Note this dough is going to be very sticky so resist the urge to use too much flour just use enough to prevent sticking.

Score the loaves as desired and prepare your oven for baking with steam.

Set your oven for 500 degrees F. at least 30 minutes before ready to bake.  When ready to bake place the loaves into your on  your oven stone with steam and lower the temperature immediately to 450 degrees.    When both loaves are golden brown and reached an internal temperature of 200 degrees F. you can remove them from the oven.

Let the loaves cool down for at least an 3 hours or so before eating as desired.

Comments

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

Hope you will be able enjoy that wonderful bread while safe and dry! Prayers for all in Sandy's path.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thank you we can use all the help we can get!

So far so good, but the worst won't be here until later tonight.

varda's picture
varda

The top edge is just nicking us now but it must be wet and windy where you are.    Nice bread for the storm.    I'm just starting a borodinsky to be baked tomorrow in the fireplace if need be.   -Varda

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Varda,

Had to chuckle here....I am working on a Borodinsky loaf to be baked tomorrow too....but do not expect any power outages this far inland though I do have plenty of dry firewood for any winter storms that we may get this season....but nothing to compare with what you are about to get hit with....

My thoughts are with all of you hoping you stay safe and warm - out of harms way.

Take Care,

Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Varda.  It's getting pretty windy.  Hope I can hang onto the power for a while longer.

Look forward to reading about your borodinsky if I have any power :)

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Ian,

Good to know you will have bread to eat.  The storm fronts moving your way sound rather frightening when I check the news which I don't normally do because I know they tend to sensationalize which sets off panic mode which, I think, is what they want for some reason.

 Glad to know people like you are level headed and do what you can to protect yourselves in a rational way.  The advanced warnings help in preparation...can't imagine what it would have been like before we had the capacity to predict these things...now that is a scary thought..

In any event, a storm of this magnitude does bring danger and leaves devastation in its wake....so I am keeping you all in my thoughts because that is about all I can do from this distance....

Take Good Care of Yourselves!

Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Janet.

I hope they are exagerating but unfortunately I think this time it is going to live up to the hype.

We have the flashlights, water, bread, kindle charged and phones charged.  Just hope we can hold onto the power but it's going to be a miracle.

Luckily we are far enough from the bay that we should be safe from flooding but the big trees in my backyard may pose a much more frightening threat.


Thanks for the well wishes.

Ian

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Gulp.... I know about big trees and wind....We have some huge maples, pines, ashes and a locust tree that I try to ignore when the winds get a howling around here during our summer thunder storms.  Early or late snow storms do lots of damage to them too but I would rather live with them then on a prairie.   

My other past time is wood burning to keep us warm in the winter.  My first adventure into the world of 'interactive electronics'  was on Hearth.com where most of the 'regulars' were from your neck of the woods....lots of East coasters both north and south.  They were always glad for their stoves when storms hit and power was out but they were also glad when all settled down and they could go out scrounging for downed trees = free fire wood.  

I hope your trees all stay standing or, if they are inclined to blow over, that they do it in a direction that hurts no one.  Glad to know you are out of the flooding zone though none of it sounds good at all.  Are you supposed to get any of the storm headed down from Canada or is that further West?

In any event - Glad to know your have your emergency equipment close at hand.  

Take Care,

Janet

isand66's picture
isand66

We escaped with minor damage just a downed fence and loss of power.  The neighbors lost 2 trees and across the street a big tree fell on their roof.  My Mom is heading home now to see how much damage was done as she lives across from the South Bay.

thanks every one for your prayers and well wishes.  I wish I could bake some bread just to taken my mind off everything but I don't have a WFO :(

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Ian,

Thanks for letting us know you are okay and were lucky.  I feel for your  neighbors who have a lot of work ahead of them before things can get back to 'normal'.  I keep thinking that it is lucky that this isn't January as snow and ice make clean up all that more difficult but if it were Jan. you wouldn't be in the place you are in right now....so it is what it is.  Hope your  mom's home was okay too. 

How is the power situation where you are now?  The news here reports millions without power and I wonder if that includes you?

I know around here when we have severe weather it always amazes me how people work together so well to get things up and running.  Our public service co. comes to mind when we had a tornado through here a few summers ago.  Those young men did not stop until we all had power again and that is no small task with fallen trees on lines etc.  They were out there from sun up to sun down.  Took over a week for some of us to get electricity back.....I now own a small generator that can be fueled by propane or gas....Luckily I haven't needed it but it is a comfort knowing it is there if needed again....

Take Care,

Janet

 

isand66's picture
isand66

We are very lucky.  We just had our power turned back on while most of Long Island is still in the dark.

Appreciate your concern.

Regards,
Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

very attractive looking bread, ian! lovely color to the crust, and the crumb is well intact for such a flour mixture.. must be delight to eat :)

i hope you stay out of harms way. my prayers to you and yours.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Khalid.

I have to say this one came out very tasty!  The corn slurry really made the crumb nice and moist and the yeast water with SD combo helped as well.  I've already eaten almost 1 loaf.  I have to make sure I pace myself since I don't know when I will have any power to bake as I'm pretty sure I will lose the power soon enough.

Thanks for your prayers.

Appreciate everyone's well wishes from my TFL family!

Regards,
Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the crust on this bread. Thick, dark and it has to be tasty.  Nice open crumb for all the whole grains.  This is the kind of bread we like!  We also like a little potato, in your case,  and oats too. Now you need to really go hog wild and put some  sprouts and scald in there - and some hemp seeds or I will sick Hanseata on you :-)

Nice baking Ian.  Hope you and your Mom survive nature's furry named Sandy - be safe.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA....I didn't have time to make any potatoes for this one so I used potato flour.  Next time I will certainly consider some additional goodies :).

We just got our power back so things are gettin back to normal.  It's funny how much it hurts to not have power when we rely on it so much.

My Mom's house got hit pretty hard as they have a couple of feet of water in their den and my Mom's car is totaled from the water.

Regards,
Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

about your Mom's house and car.  I feared the worse when I saw the devistation of homes on the south side of Long Island that were on the beach.  Hope your Mom had Flood Insurance.

There is a terrible rumor that the police and firemen that lived in Queens torched their own homes there, wiping out nearly 100 homes, because they didn't have flood insurance but their Home Owners Insurance would pay if the house burned.  Let's hope that is not true.

isand66's picture
isand66

I certainly hope that is just a rumor as I would like to believe that our police and firemen would not stoop that low.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Good to know you're back on track, Ian, and that you and your mother aren't hurt. 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Khalid.  It's all kind of like a Bad dream  We are lucky as some people lost everything.  The devastation is unbelievable.