The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

My trip to King Arthur Flour

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MANNA's picture
MANNA

My trip to King Arthur Flour

Went to King Arthur Flour for the bagette class with Jeffery Hammelman. Here are some pics from my trip. I learned so much. If you get the chance it is definitly worth it.

Here is a pic from the parking lot.

And here is one from the bakery while discussing different bagettes.

When I download some more pics I will post them.

MANNA's picture
MANNA

Some pics from my cell phone. Not the greatest.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

I'm very jeaolous.

I've been trying to make another trip myself to visit the new baking center and store.

 

Hopefully I can get there sometime soon.

Thanks for rubbing it in :)

 

MANNA's picture
MANNA

Another cell phone pic. Again, its not the greatest pic of the cafe. It was extremely busy in there.

FeelingFoodish's picture
FeelingFoodish

Looks like a great trip! Can you say what the highlights were for you personally?

MANNA's picture
MANNA

Everyone was there to learn how to make bagettes. I went to learn more about the baking process as a whole. I learned alot from what mixing really does to dough on a chemical level. We have heard of oxidizing or burning the dough without really understanding whats going on. I now know what it is, what effect it has on the dough and what it tastes like (YUCK!, its bad). How to evaluate the baking process to ensure you are baking your loafs properly. Checking the doneness of the bread to determine when its cooked. I had always used the look of the bread and checked its internal temp to determine doneness, boy was I wrong. Jeff proved to me without a doubt I was way off base. I have alot of test baking to do on my recipes to perfect not only the bread but the handling and baking process as a whole. Leaned alot about the stages of dough as its mixed and different ways to handle it to produce a desired outcome for the final bread. Jeff said it was the most intesive class they offer on baking and you do ALOT of baking. It was bagettes six ways, we did it seven ways and in 10 hours over two days. He discussed proofing schedules, bakers math, formula conversions and the list goes on and on. Money well spent!

FeelingFoodish's picture
FeelingFoodish

I would LOVE to do something like this....how far in advance did you have to book the class? Also, I'm curious - do you own his book? I'm wondering if a lot of this can be learned from the book for those of us who may not be able to travel to Vermont? I realize that hands on is probably the best, but....

MANNA's picture
MANNA

Yes, I own his book and there is alot of information in the beginning. I read bread books and watch videos and bake constantly. I still learned alot and identified alot of things I was doing wrong. I was on the wait list for over a year to get into the class.

isand66's picture
isand66

So what did he show you regarding on how to tell if your loaf was done?  I'm very curious what way he uses versus taking the internal temperature.

MANNA's picture
MANNA

Breads internal temperature peaks about 60% into the baking process. A better way to determine doneness is by crust/color and the crumb. You can also give the bread a squeeze and the ole thump test to gauge how much the crust has set and the doneness of the crumb. Bake your loaf intill the crust is set and reached the proper color. Take it out and let it cool. Cut it open and check the crumb. If it is to dry raise the oven temp, still wet lower the temp. you want the temp adjusted so the crust and crumb are done at the same time. I have the issue of my 5-grain bread sometimes getting a dry crumb and the crust isnt set. So I will raise the oven temp next time I bake to prevent drying the crumb while accelerating the crust formation. Those of you who are interested in the documented test results of bread internal temperature contact Cooks County Kitchen ( most of you should know them from public access tv). They did a big test after Jeff returned from teaching in Japan during 2002. He had a student in his class that did informal testing during the baking process and presented him with his results. After Jeff returned from teaching he passed the info to Cooks Kitchen who inependently verified the results and provided him with the test documentation.

FeelingFoodish's picture
FeelingFoodish

Wow!!! I assumed it was popular, but I didn't realize it was that popular. It's good to hear that you liked it despite all the knowledge that you already have.

I'm just now beginning my bread making journey. I've ordered his book and am eager to begin learning. I'll keep this class in the back of my mind as a possibility for some time in the future.

Thanks for sharing,

Marie

proth5's picture
proth5

let you keep the hats?  Vermont is a bit far for me - but I'd consider it if you get a "free" hat... :>)

MANNA's picture
MANNA

yep, you get to keep the hat. We had to wear something in the bakery. And, lunch was provided the second day. The food was good I ate in the cafe a few times and was always happy with what I got.

CelesteU's picture
CelesteU

I did a wood fired oven class w/Hamelman back in April...well worth the cost & my travel.  He's a very accessible teacher who is generous with his knowledge.  I booked the class about 3-4 months in advance.  I'd definitely take another of his classes if the opportunity arose.

MANNA's picture
MANNA

I wood love to take that class. Im going to start building my WFO over the next 2 years to ramp up my bread production so I can get some commercial accounts.