The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tartine Bread Question

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paralleli's picture
paralleli

Tartine Bread Question

I've tried the Tartine Bread 3 or 4 times now (the first recipe in the book).  I have the book, a healthy starter and the recommended cast iron cooking pot.  We're enjoying the bread but I've had the same problem each time.  The finished loaf, which looks wonderful, always has a LARGE (like 2"w x 1.5"h) gas pocket or void running along the top of the finished loaf under the crust!  Looks like hell and makes it hard to make a sandwich with.

I'm following the timing, shaping and forming recommended in the text. Any thoughts as to why this might be happening?

Thanks!

 

carblicious's picture
carblicious

Sounds like you're underproofing the dough. If you're following the times, is your kitchen cooler than described in the book?

With the Tartine dough, my final rise is always longer than prescribed in the book, as my kitchen is cooler. The finger indent test hasn't been super reliable, so I would portion a small piece of dough and place that in a small container and use that to help gauge readiness of the bread. If the small dough is 1.5x to 2x, then the larger dough is ready to bake.

Interesting discussion of sourdoughs not needing to double: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19984/do-you-allow-your-sourdough-double-during-bulk-fermentation

 

paralleli's picture
paralleli

Generally, the kitchen is cooler.  I'll try your trick of using a smaller piece of dough to  gauge the dough's progress.  Thanks!

totels's picture
totels

I have generally found that his instructions to be gentle with the dough during the later stages of the bulk rise to be unecessary. I bake in London and it is generally cooler here than it would be in SF as well. I am also probably more fierce with the deflation during shaping to get all of the large bubbles pressed out.

msbreadbaker's picture
msbreadbaker

How about a dough rising bucket? I have 2, one for small loaves and one for double loaves. The measurements are clearly marked on the side and they work very well. No doubts as to double or what ever you want. King Arthur is where I got mine, but I'm sure there are plenty of places and they are not expensive.

paralleli's picture
paralleli

Yes,  that was the first thing that crosed my mind, that somehow I was trapping a pocket during the final shaping that was allowing a huge gas bubble to form.

Ruralidle's picture
Ruralidle

Hi Redboy

Welcome to TFL.

Whilst carblicious is partially correct, the large void at the top of the loaf produces what is known as a "flying crust" and that is also frequently caused by OVERproofing.  However, the message is still the same, watch the dough, not the clock.  Good Luck, Happy Baking!

carblicious's picture
carblicious

Sorry about that, missed that you noted that the hole is up top.  That is the telltale sign of over proofing.  If the dough is dense but there are large cavities, that under proofing.  Sorry, sleep deprived.