The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Baking with muriatic acid

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

Baking with muriatic acid

and I thought this was only good to clean oily driveways :)

Check out "unfermented bread" from November 1879.

http://www.ctgenweb.org/county/cowindham/records/other/recipes1800s.htm

 

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

Nope, also good for removing heavy lime deposits from fishtank heaters, water stills, and toilet bowls.  They must have a drafty kitchen.  I always hold my breath when I squirt that stuff on things.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

thank you, MangoChutney :)

GrapevineTexas's picture
GrapevineTexas

I've lost myself in the midst of all the recipes.  Thanks!

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

another great download is the 1887 White House Cookbook at www.gutenberg.org

Happy baking and cooking :)

Anna

 

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

You may both enjoy this link.  Select the date of publication on the right-hand side of the screen.

http://openlibrary.org/search?q=cookbook&has_fulltext=true

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

thank you, Mango :)

anna

copyu's picture
copyu

If you're a fanatic of 'old printed stuff' you could check out Lee Valley Tools—they do reprints of old wood-working, sailing, children's and household crafts. I bought the volume "Lee's Priceless Recipes", first published 1895.

http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=46100&cat=1,46096&ap=2

Reading these formulae makes me realize how "dumb" we're getting. Back in the day, not just the local 'druggist', but even school-kids, farmers and home-makers were all "chemists" of a sort! It's a bit hard to find "Ferrocyanide of Potassium", "Hydrochloric (Muriatic) Acid" or "Tincture of Opium" anywhere these days, but they used to be normal items to keep around the home, the office or the dairy...fun reading! Thanks for posting the link to the White House Cookbook.

Best,

Adam

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

thank you, copyu :)

anna

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

Lowe's carries muriatic (hydrochloric) acid.  Potassium ferrocyanide is listed for sale on Amazon, somewhat to my surprise.  Tincture of Opium, aka laudanum, isn't obtainable anymore without a prescription.  I'll not comment on the dumbing down of the American people except to remind everyone that in 1994 a woman succeeded in legally forcing McDonald's to pay her damages because the hot coffee she spilled in her lap injured her.  Well, duh.

 

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

A very simple soda bread using the acid as the, well, acid in the recipe. The recipe calls for only one tablespoon, so I don't think there's much to worry about. Be sure to add the acid to the water and not vice versa.

cheers,

gary

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

chemistry was not my strong subject  :)

Anna

 

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

Oh, I'm sorry Anna.  I thought you understood that it was replacing vinegar as the acid in that recipe, or I would have explained.  In that case, I will explain that it doesn't actually clean oil from driveways.  It etches the concrete, which is kind of like artificial limestone, into a rougher surface so that paint will stick better.  I thought you were just being casual with the statement.  *smile*

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that all I need to do is use the pool water when baking, things could have been so much different :-)

MangoChutney's picture
MangoChutney

If you are referring to chlorination, that is not done with hydrochloric acid.  Chlorine bleach is most commonly sodium hypochlorite, which is not acidic.  If you've actually been acidifying your swimming pool with hydrochloric acid, ignore me and carry on.  *smile*

GrapevineTexas's picture
GrapevineTexas

Anna, Mango and Copyu, the additional links are keeping me busy.  ;)

Thanks so much!