The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Fossil marble stone

harum's picture
harum

Fossil marble stone

Hello, Does anyone have experience using black fossil marble slab for bread baking?  I have found an inch thick marble slab which perfect dimensions make one think that it might have been used for baking before.  And at some earlier point in its life it used to be a part of a kitchen countertop.  It is polished on one side and rough on the other.   Is there a way to say that this marble slab is safe for the oven, that is, has not been treated with solvents or sealants?  Would appreciate any suggestion.  Thanks, h.

Ford's picture
Ford

I have no experience with this material.  Marble is primarily made of calcium carbonate.  This material is readily attacked by acids.  It decomposes with high heat (way above normal oven temperatures).   I would rather use granite or a pizza stone, but you could try the marble and see for yourself.  I doubt that it contains any trace elements that would be harmful.

Ford

 

harum's picture
harum

Thank you for your reply. My only concern with this black fossil marble slab is that it might have been treated with a chemical sealant to avoid stains. Some kinds of marbles are quite porous and because of that stain easily. Not sure about this particular black fossil marble. That this is a natural stone is also just my assumption.

jcrossmyheart01's picture
jcrossmyheart01

For most pastry chefs, Marble Countertop is a traditional working surface because the cold stone keeps the butter in the pastry layers from melting. But polished granite would probably work as well. But when we speak of durability, No doubt Granite is the best. Iit is indeed harder, stronger stone than marble. It also resists impacts and scratches better. But it will ready depend on your taste. Anyway, both looks pretty. I want to share this site that might help you http://www.myinstalledcountertops.com