The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

A bit of Italian Baking

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Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

A bit of Italian Baking

Over a year ago I received my copy of Carol Field's "The Italian Baker". 

Until today I only used the recipes for Pugliese and the Chocolate And Milk Bread, both being among our favourite breads.

I wanted to explore this great book more in depth for a while, and took y first step today - making the white Pane Di Como, and the 50% rye Pane Nero Di Bolzano.

Both came out very nice, the Pane Nero with an amazing and surprising note of almond.

Both are highly recommended.

Here some photos:

Here the crumb (along with two breads baked earlier):

Pane Nero and Pane Di Como are in the middle; the left slices are from a Whole-Wheat Levain (from Hamelman's "Bread"), the slices to the right are from my Russian Rye.

Cheers,

Juergen

 

 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Nice group of breads Juergen.

I like you scoring patterns and nice and dark crust.

I have a ton of bread books and I might even have the Carol Fields one, so I have to go and check now so I can try it!  :)

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Thank you very much for your comment.

Carol Field's book is an interesting one indeed, although all the breads in there are yeasted. But I find that the methods used yield breads very different from the usual white breads.

Both breads above use a sponge. The book says to leave the sponge ferment for at least 3 hours, preferably overnight - which I chose to do.

In the morning the sponges had risen and fallen, and had it been a poolish I would have thrown it out. But out came these lovely breads!

 

 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Wonderful.

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Floyd, Much appreciated

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

 

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

has to offer some great formulas - and from time to time I enjoy baking with yeasted doughs very much. 

Over the past couple of Months I looked into a few recipes for yeasted rye breads, and so far the Pane Nero is the most exciting one of those - very different from sourdough.

Thanks a lot,

Juergen

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

And yet another bread baking book worth having?

Karin

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

if I am getting you into trouble ...

Juergen

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Juergen.  From what I can tell, almost every town in Italy has their own kind or type of bread so baking Italian must be a life long quest.  Amazing how consistent all of your crumbs turn out.

Nice baking.

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Hi Brownman,

We love variety, and the yeasted rye is a nice addition to the repertoire.

The flours I use are weak in comparison to American bread flours - I now use stoneground organic flour from Bacheldre.

I am very happy about the crumb consistency of my breads, although I don't get those big holes in some of them; but I feel I know the reasons:

1. The weak flour - I won't change that; it tastes too good

2. My oven is quite imited. I think I have a good handle on what it can do.

Thanks a lot,

Juergen

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Lovely work Juergen,

So you've made the switch from Shipton to Bacheldre flour?   Very interesting!!!

All good wishes

Andy

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Thank you, Andy. 

Yes, to do the switch is very interesting.

The white organic flours by Shipton and Bacheldre are not vastly different, but I like the more stoneground feel of the Bacheldre - more tiny bits of bran. When I first used it my wife thought I had picked up some dust from somewhere in the kitchen ...

Now, the rye, that's an entirely different matter. The batches I recieved from Shipton (25Kg sacks) where somewhat changeable. The Bacheldre would be called fine rye meal in Germany, and it doesn't do too well in the Honey Cake from ITJB - but the sourdoughs are a lot more flavorful, and I feel the performance is more consistent.

Best Wishes,

Juergen

 

ananda's picture
ananda

I love Bacheldre Rye!

A

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Pan Bigio, something like a wholewheat Pugliese. Very tasty:

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

little extra WW and rye in our Pulgliese breads especially David Snyder's Capriosso version  to give them additional and more ecomplex flavors.  It is one of our favorite breads.  Your Bigio must be just as tasty!

Nice baking

clementinebakes's picture
clementinebakes

I just pulled my Pane Nero out of the oven, with disappointing results.  I made the sponge last night and let it ferment.  After making the dough this morning, it rose much faster than I expected.  I shaped it and let it double, but when I put it in the oven, it did not rise much at all.  It was going to be a gift for a friend, but now I'm afraid it will be sub-par...but I don't want to slice into it.  Any way to tell if it's going to be dense and disgusting?  This is the first thing I've made out of the Italian Baker.

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

The Pane Nero is naturally very dense, and when it is well proved it won't rise much in the oven. Mine rose maybe 10%. The taste is absolutely rewarding. Had some of mine today after 4 days - without a sign of staling (maybe, a little bit). 

By the way - the loaves in the first picture (Pan Nero and Pane di Como) are all around 800g - you can see that the volume of the Pan Nero is about half of that of a fluffy white bread. This is by design.

Did you use fennel or caraway?

Welcome to TFL, by the way!