The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

new baker on the block

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jconsford's picture
jconsford

new baker on the block

Hello, my name is Jonathan and I am going to start baking bread for a spanish restraunt here in el paso.  I was wondering if you had any tips or advice for a novice baker.  Also if u have any recipes for bread that has of spanish influence that would be amazing

cranbo's picture
cranbo

Welcome to TFL. Coco de Cristal / Pan de Cristal is a popular type of Spanish bread these days. Search the forums for info about it and recipes that some are working on. 

latmel's picture
latmel

Have just bought this book based on recommendations from Amazon customers.  It is so well illustrated, great photos with step by step instructions, and am looking forward to trying many of his recipes of which there is much variety in his breads, sour doughs, gluten free, and pastries recipes.   The only drawback is he is from England so the pan sizes are different from ours so am asking some of you math gurus to help me to increase this basic recipe to fit an 8"x4" pan instead of the English size of 6"x4".  I baked the recipe yesterday, using whole wheat flour and used the 8x4 pan which made a mini version but the bread is delicious.  This is such a good recipe for a one person household such as mine.  Have baked all my years, but never seriously baked the new methods of artisian or sour dough, espically, love the no knead.  Now that I am 83 years young, I have the time and patience for bread baking.  Have had good success with my starter made with pineapple juice and whole wheat flour and recipes from KAF and Peter Reinhart's Struan Bread, which is the best bread ever.  Seems my biggest problem for the day is deciding what bread to bake today!

On to the help with the recipe:

Basic Bread

300g whole wheat 

6g salt

2g active dry yeast

230g warm water

Need to increase these ingredient amounts for a 8x4 pan.    The recipe fits the English 6"x4" pan.

Many thanks, This is a very exciting new venture for me.

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Hi Emannual

it looks as though you need 1/3 or 33% more dough in your pan  so

400g whole wheat

8g salt

3g yeast

307g warm water will be the same formula.    yield will be 718g + or -

by the way the hydration level is 76 - 77%

good luck

regards Yozza

latmel's picture
latmel

Many thanks Yozza for increasing the ingredient amounts for me.   Am going to bake another loaf this morning so I can use my 8x4 loaf pan.  Best wishes to you.

Mary

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

into the search box and hit search.    You might find something you like. 

jconsford's picture
jconsford

My bread has been coming out as my boss says "like cake" with a uniform crumb.  He wants a real rustic bread with lots of holes, I read some content on here and ive been using bread flour instead of unbleached AP, so im going to change that and i need to make a starter or preferment, autolyse, and fold the dough.... any other suggestions?

cranbo's picture
cranbo

If you want rustic with lots of holes, you'll want high hydration (70% or more) and a long, slow cool fermentation. Stretch and fold is a good technique for this as well, to build a nice irregular gluten structure. 

If your bread is ending up too "cakey" it could be a number of factors. The level of sugars/fats/proteins in your recipe could be too high. You could also not be developing the gluten enough by underkneading. If it's too uniform (think Wonder or store-bought sandwich bread), you probably kneaded too much

Look at the Tartine Country Bread recipe as a good starting place. 

 

 

latmel's picture
latmel

Baked the bread with the new measurment for the ingredients.  The dough was very very sticky, added more flour as I kneeded but persevered with the sticky dough, got a decent rise after 4 brief kneedings in the bowl per Mr Hadjiandreou's instructions, formed the dough into rectangle shape to fit my 8x4 pan, let it rise again, did get decent rises, placed a pan with water in lowest rack in my oven, preheated oven to 400, added a cup of water to the already heated pan, made a thin slash on dough,  then baked the bread for 30 minutes......came out with beautiful brown crust and perfect size.  Patiently gave the loaf 25 minutes to cool before getting a slice with butter.  Must tell you, it is quite delicious, so pleased with the outcome and will be doing this one again and again.  Many thanks again,

Mary

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

I commend you for your wishes to become a good baker.  My own experience of over 40 years is that it is a slow process which, because there are so many variables to learn, will take quite a long time.  I hope you can find a mentor baker friend who will take you on as an apprentice/observor while he/she bakes the kinds of bread you want.  Even that will take lots of sessions.  You can also learn from a book written by an expert.  I always recommend working from a text book rather than from a bread cookbook with some essays on the subject of bread baking.  Text books take you from the ground up giving you a foundation of knowledge that essays in bread cookbooks simply can't.  I recommend DiMuzio's Bread Baking.  It takes you from novice to very well informed, is written well, and has graded exercises along the way which, if done diligently, will help lots.  You can also click on "handbook" at the top of this and every other TFL page.  It's important to understand that you cannot know the level of expertise of the answerers of questions you might pose on this website, especially if you're a beginner.  If you read through a text book at least you'll have a basis on which to judge.  You can overwhelm yourself completely by starting with Hamelman's Bread.  It's not for beginners.  Ask yourself why serious bakers study at schools for months, if not years.