The Fresh Loaf

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Potato flour bread recipe

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Potato flour bread recipe

I need to develop a recipe for a simple bread using a non wheat flour for my allergenic grandson. He can't have any wheat or any grain with gluten, tree seeds, milk products or eggs. As I understand it that eliminates sesame seeds and flax along with almond flour. This doesn't leave much to work with.

This will have to be a quick bread type of formula with home made baking powder. I think xantham gum is OK to use.

This is an elimination diet that will last for at least 3 Months. My daughter is getting frustrated trying to find things he can eat. His primary protein source is a liquid non allergenic juice/powder mix that tastes awful. He can have sun-flour butter so I'm hoping to be able to make a bread she can spread with the sunflower butter.

Any ideas? Thanks.

Eric

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Eric, that is a tough spot for the little guy and for the family,also. I have a few ideas for you and a few links.

Even if celiac is not your grandsons problem, the dietary restrictions may be similar so I always refer people to this site:

http://www.celiac.com/

This next link is for a great network of people that experience severe allergies in themselves and their kids. There may be a local chapter that would offer support,meetings or resources.

http://www.foodallergy.org/

As for ingredient substitutions:

Yeast can be fruit based yeast water as an alternate leavener. It is easy to make (for someone with sourdough experience) and works quite well.

How about a corn based bread? Corn wasn't mentioned as restricted and many poeple eat corn bread as their only type of bread.

Are legumes allowed? If so, soy milk works well as a milk substitute. I wish they wouldn't call it "milk" though because the kids expect it to taste like milk and it doesn't. Call it "soy juice".

Look at Kosher resipes for some non-dairy,non leavened ideas.

   

Don't try and re-invent the wheel. There are more and more gluten free products and people that need them. Some have even started their own product lines like this one:

http://www.julesglutenfree.com/

Try some of them and see what happens.

Wheat and gluten can be everywhere and in some unexpected places so I encourage you to use the Allergy network site to find these hidden sources and learn about cross contamination in food manufacturers. Talk to people locally and see how they coped. The local chapter was a great source of help when I needed it. I'm lucky in that my little guy grew out of his food allergies.

Good luck and remember to help him understand what he CAN have and not what he CAN'T. Also, help him understand that all people need different things to be healthy.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Thanks for your thoughtful reply. Nope on the corn also but some beans are ok. The allergy network site looks promising. I'll spend some time looking at that. The soy milk is out also so the liquid will be water. He can have most fruits. The only protein (meat) allowed is turkey. So he has the good fortune of his grandpa's smoked turkey drums. I smoked 20 of them last week for them to eat from the freezer.

Eric

Mebake's picture
Mebake

.Even though i have nothing to offer as advice. I sincerely hope that your precious grandson overcomes his dietry limitations

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Thanks, I appreciate your thoughts. These first 3-1/2 years have been hard on him and he is still a happy energetic boy.

Eric

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I forgot to suggest working with Children's Hospital in Milwaukee. Their dietary department may be able to help with ordering special foods and devloping a diet with actual recipes. I had a friend in similar circumstances many years ago and they were a godsend.

The other idea I had is he may be happy with wraps and flatbreads. Many times the more forgiving and simpler breads are best. Flat breads, wraps,pancakes and even a focaccia-like bread can be made with almost any type of "flour" (teff,amaranth,tapioca,buckwheat,potatoe)and leavener. The "gums" can help form a starchy matrix if there is any gas to be trapped. Same with sweets-brownies and bars offer the best tasting alternatives as they aren't so texture fussy.

Take a look at Indian and Vegan (not vegetarian) cuisine. They may offer some acceptable protein ideas and flavors.

Probiotics (I'm thinking water kefir,kombucha tea,fermented vegetables) may help with overall gut-health.

Good luck! It takes lots of practice to get comfortable. I always brought a full meal to family events for my allergic kids and plenty to share.I had several favorite "go to" recipes and that worked great.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

The wraps might work out well too. Good idea. Made with an approved flour that will give them some options. He is being treated at Children's Hosp and the head Gastroenterologist. The nutritionist has been a big help with this difficult food selection. He's been tested positive for allergic reaction to corn, beef, pork, chicken and dairy. At the moment they are trying to do a food elimination diet that cuts out the other things. It's very restrictive.

I think there are some ancient grains that might be OK too but I haven't seen the list yet.

Eric

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

unless your grandson has a specific allergy to them, too.  Neither originates from trees.  You are right about avoiding almonds (and walnuts, and pecans, and hickory nuts, and cashews, and butternuts, and heart nuts, and hazelnuts, etc.).  I imagine that peanuts are on the "do not eat" list, too, given the wide range of his allergies.

What about coconut products?  Has he shown sensitivity to them?  Or rice?  That might open the door for coconut foods/beverages or for rice milk.

clazar123 beat me to the punch with the teff (think injera bread) or buckwheat suggestions.

From what you've listed, whey- and soy-based protein powders would be out.  However, I did see a canister of hemp-based protein powder at Trader Joe's this weekend.  Not having scanned through the nutrition information on the label, I don't know whether it would be free of other items that aggravate his allergies.  Still, it is something that you may want to look into as another way to get protein into his diet.  There are also protein powders that use peas or rice or algae as their source.  How is he with fish?

I hope you find things that help him to thrive.

Paul

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Sunflower is the only seed or nut that's OK. Coconut oil is OK so maybe the milk would be OK too. I'll have to check on the hemp products. That might be an option too.

Thanks for your thoughts Paul.

Eric

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

options like sushi and rice cakes and what about raw fish?   Which makes me wonder about seaweed and fish roe, clams and mussels.  

Lamb is worth clearing and perhaps goat cheese, venison or duck?  goose?  Tapioca flour?   crackers or chips made with agreeable foods  :)