The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

lemon curds

qahtan's picture
qahtan

lemon curds

Picturebroc029.jpg

qahtan's picture
qahtan

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup white sugar
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 3 lemons, zested
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted
DIRECTIONS
  1. In a microwave-safe bowl, whisk together the sugar and eggs until smooth. Stir in lemon juice, lemon zest and butter. Cook in the microwave for one minute intervals, stirring after each minute until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a metal spoon. Remove from the microwave, and pour into small sterile jars.
Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

That sounds yummy. I take it they don't have to be processed in a hot water bath?

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I've been thinking of getting rid of the microwave because I rarely use it (and I need the room for more bread books)! But when I saw this recipe I went and bought the lemons and will try making the lemon curd soon. It sounds so simple, why is it so expensive to buy?? Thanks for this recipe qahtan.                                                                                                                  weavershouse

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

I have a great freezer ginger-apple jam made in the microwave. Extremely easy and delish! Nuke and freeze, can't get much better

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I would love the recipe and I think it's ok to post it. It is going to go ON bread, right.                                                             weavershouse

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

1 c finely chopped fresh ginger

5-6 large crisp apples, cored, finely chopped

2 c apple juice

6 c sugar

1 t powdered ginger

chopped crystallized ginger

Use a large, deep microwavable container for ginger root, apple & juice. Nuke on high about 40 min, till softened. Stir sugar in until dissolved. Cook on high for 20-30 minutes to reach jam stage. It will be nicely thickened. Add remaining ingredients and then cool. Spoon into jars and freeze.

 

pumpkinpapa's picture
pumpkinpapa

Mmmm, wonderful qahtan!

Say do you have a recipe for clotted cream too?

Scones and lemon curd, must get some more flour tomorrow. 

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 This is the nearest I can get to clotted cream, the milk here in Canada is not rich enough, but I do know how it is done...

 I lived for a while in Devonshire, UK. home of clotted cream . qahtan

pumpkinpapa's picture
pumpkinpapa

I can get raw Guernsey milk from some Amish farmers up north, it has a nice yellow hue to it and the taste is quite rich as the fat content is about 3.8% (mainstream holstein milk is 3.25%).

Net time I get some I will have to try to make clotted cream. Is that a crust on the top?

This milk makes lovely sweet pancakes, mmmm yummy! Thanks for the pic qahtan, I now have something to work towards. 

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 

 

 Tomorrow I will try and write details of how to get clotted cream.....

                                    ;-)))) qahtan

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 If the milk is not homogenized, and left to rest until the cream comes to the top of the milk you need to pour that cream off into a bowl, and save it until you have enough to clot.

My mum used to save the cream over several days.

 Pour that cream into a clean  large fairly flat pan, Mum used stainless steel.

 Do this carefully. put this pan of cream into a larger pan with water in the bottom, and slowly, slowly heat the cream in the oven, just above warm, over several hours until the top of the cream looks sort of crusty and looks as if the cream has changed colour slightly.

 Carefully , carefully remove from oven from the water pan and let it cool then chill it as is still in pan..

 Next morning  skim off the top going down about 1/2 inch or so. It should then look like the picture I posted.

 The remaining milk/cream  can be used as custards or what ever...... qahtan

 REMEMBER THOUGH THAT CLOTTED CREAM HAS A TOTALLY DIFFERENT TASTE AND TEXTURE TO REGULAR CREAM.

 Devon shire cream is sold in many shops in little glass bottles but it is not clotted cream...... enjoy 

  I just found this

"Double Devon Cream" and Clotted Cream: A potted history.


Both Devon and Cornwall - counties in the South West of England - are famous for their thick cream, which is mainly produced on farms, and in small dairies.
The most famous of all is 'Clotted Cream' which achieves its thick clotted texture by heating cream of high-fat breed cows, such as the Jersey type, in pans, traditionally made of copper but latterly stainless steel, to about 190°f and allowing it to cool slowly. In the farmhouses, the pans were heated crudely over a fire or stove and the cream was rich in acid and aroma-producing bacteria. Dairy or factory methods were much better controlled, using steam heated pans. The cream is usually packed in shallow trays a few inches deep and forms a yellow crusty surface. The consistency is thick and heavy, almost like treacle, and is traditionally served by scooping the cream out into cups or small cartons.