The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hubbard Sunflower Sourdough Boule!

tigressbakes's picture
tigressbakes

Hubbard Sunflower Sourdough Boule!

Hubbard Sunflower Sourdough

This is my Hubbard Sunflower Sourdough Boule it is an adaptation of Nancy Silverton's Pumpkin Bread in Bread from LaBrea Bakery.

The taste is wonderful. It has a bit of Cumin in it and raw sunflower seeds of course -and I used my last Hubbard taken up from the root cellar from last summer -under the right conditions those beauties last forever!

Hubbard Sunflower Sourdough Boule!

I am extremely happy with the shape (been working hard on that) and I think that my slashing is getting better (thanks Sourdoug-guy!). I used the LaCloche top on a baking stone for the first 20 minutes for this one - and then another 15 without, crust is great! That technique is really working for me. (I am sorry I foget who explained that one to me but you know who you are - thank you!)

HSS Crumb

Any suggestions on why the Crumb tuned out this this? This is maybe about the 5th or 6th sourdough I've baked from my 3 month old starter. I really love the taste, and at least in the kinds of breads I have been baking so far, the more rustic, country sourdough breads - I like a bit of a heavier crumb, and moist. I haven't got up the nerve to try Ciabatta, bagette, etc yet - so we will see what happens when I go there. BUT - for this beautiful delicious bread, I don't know why the crumb did this? About half way through it started to show some of these odd shaped large holes here and there.

What is the cause of that?

Comments

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Hi Tigressbakes,

I think that's a masterpiece. Maybe the big holes weren't what you were shooting for, but that irregular hole structure is elusive and sought after in artisan breads. That's a beautiful WW loaf.

The high hydration doughs, like the recent ciabatta/pagnotta recipes blogged lately, tend to have that kind of hole structure. I think it could also happen if the bulk fermentation goes for too long on a somewhat less wet dough. When that happens, the dough would be puffier and looser and more floppy with some bubbles sticking up along the surface.

Bill

tigressbakes's picture
tigressbakes

I don't know if I would call it a masterpiece (blush) but I am very happy with it.

I did know that the rustic breads with wetter dough call for an irregular whole structure, and I have been admiring the loaves on the Ciabatta/Pagnotta links. I wasn't sure that they were desirable for this type of bread.

This bread actually has traditional stone ground WW, white organic bread flour from KAF, and the squash (which I am sure added more hydration in it then the actual liquid I added) and some germ. It did ferment in the fridge for 10 hours during the bulk and then another 10 in the fridge for the proof as per the recipe. My husband said it is the best tasting sourdough I've made yet :-)

The dough was not at all puffy, loose or floppy. Perhaps the squash had something to do with it. What amazes me is that 3 months ago I tried to bake my first yeasted bread - and had about 5 failures! Now I am making some really amazing sourdough loaves! I feel like I have SOOOO much to learn, and maybe I am having a bit of beginners luck.

I am learning so much from all of you on this site. A lot of times on the more technical threads, I can't event comment because I feel like it is at this point still above my head. I am a very hands on, need-to-create type, and my head starts to swim sometimes if I am trying to figure out or understand anything that seems like an equation! But people learn in different ways. I'm baking one step at a time...and I am so glad for all of you knowledgeable, encouraging, enthusiasts here on the Fresh Loaf!

thanks again!

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Tigressbakes,

I think the hole structure comes from a less stiff, slightly broken down gluten structure. Lots of water is one thing that does that. I think that acids that build up during fermentation can have a similar effect. Also, there are probably ingredients that could contribute to a change in the gluten structure, so maybe the squash does some of that. Anyway, I think that's a very, very nice loaf you made there.

I'm so glad you've found the site helpful and encouraging. I feel much the same way. I've improved my baking results recently due to lots and lots of good advice from the site.

Best wishes, Bill

 

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

awesome! Will you share the recipe? Pretty please? What a great combo of flavors, squash & cumin..hmmmm

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Paddyscake,

I hadn't tried putting spices in the bread until I tried the German breads I mentioned in a couple of blog entries a while back. I was very pleasantly surprised to discover that the spices added such a good flavor to those whole grain recipes. I had it in my head that I did not like caraway and anise, but in those spelt breads it really works. Cumin wasn't one of the choices in the German bread recipes, but it sounds like it could be very good. Tigressbakes, thanks for posting this.

Bill

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

flavors! I have a Black bread recipe that has among other ingredients rye flour, vinegar, cocoa, coffee, caraway, fennel, molasses, brown sugar. Quite a mix for the palate.

tigressbakes's picture
tigressbakes

I am in NYC city until the weekend and then back in my kitchen on Monday. I have my notes there and will be able to do it then. It is worth baking it!