The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Holes in my bread!

beanie's picture
beanie

Holes in my bread!

We are having problems with our sourdough having to many large holes. These holes can be the size of a table tennis ball in the centre of the loaf, they dont appear in all the loaves just a few. We are also getting holes at the base of the loaf and just under the crust at the top. Now is this an issue that relates to the way we mould the bread or is it an issue with our sourdough culture? We run the bread at 75% hydration and use both a stiff levain and a liquid levain, could this be part of the issue? Also we retard overnight.

Any help would be good!

longhorn's picture
longhorn

Mouse holes can arise from inadequate mixing (not likely but...), inadequate degassing after the bulk ferment, and improper loaf forming (leaving bubbles in the loaf. I would suggest watching some videos on loaf forming. You are probably not getting the skin good and tight and thus drawing the bubbles to the skin surface where you can get rid of them. The bubbles at the bottom are a bit of a concern. Hydration should not be a concern - you may be forming bubbles in your loaf forming process??? I don't have specific recommendations for videos.

rjerden's picture
rjerden

May not be pertinent to the types of loaves you are making, but dimpling the tops and flipping the loaf over before scoring and baking usually does the trick for me. Loaf needs to rest 10-15 minutes before scoring and going in the oven. This gives time for the bubbles to redistribute and for the loaf to re-rise a bit.

cynthia dew's picture
cynthia dew

Hello,

 

I have been baking bread for a while but for some reason I am still not sure when the dough is proofed and ready to be baked....I know that if you press your finger into a rising dough and the impression remains then it is ready but does this apply to dough proofing in pans and to dough with preferment?

 

Thanks

Cynthia

Grenage's picture
Grenage

You don't need to 'poke test' the preferment, but you do normally want to allow a good doubling of the dough.  I always consider a lingering impression over-proofed, and aim for a very slow rebound, rather than no rebound at all.

cynthia dew's picture
cynthia dew

Thanks Granage, for your helpful tip.

Once the bread is baked when I cut a slice, I can tell it needed a bit more rising but I worry about overproofing....I guess doubling in size before baking is a good way to tell though I feel the wetter doughs need longer to proof and I find they don't even rise well during baking.

Cynthia

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Actually wetter doughs ferment faster.  Try cutting the proof short and see what happens esp. if you find "they don't even rise well during baking."

Red5's picture
Red5

Quote:
We are having problems with our sourdough having to many large holes. These holes can be the size of a table tennis ball in the centre of the loaf, they dont appear in all the loaves just a few. We are also getting holes at the base of the loaf and just under the crust at the top. Now is this an issue that relates to the way we mould the bread or is it an issue with our sourdough culture? We run the bread at 75% hydration and use both a stiff levain and a liquid levain, could this be part of the issue? Also we retard overnight.

I would check how much flour you are using when shaping the loaves, it sounds like there is some flour getting into the middle of the loaf when you're rounding that is allowing that gap to form. Since it's not happening to all the loaves, and if the entire batch that your shaping came from one mix, with the same bulk, proof, and baking times...the only variable that comes into play is with the shaping.