The Fresh Loaf

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Pastrami Pizza and Pulled Pork BBQ Pizza

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isand66's picture
isand66

Pastrami Pizza and Pulled Pork BBQ Pizza

There are not too many things I like more than a pastrami sandwich, so when my wife suggested I try using some left over pastrami on a pizza I figured it was worth a shot.  I also had some left over smoked pulled pork in the refrigerator so I figured I would make a barbecued pulled pork pizza as well

I recently was gifted a cool item called the "Kettle Pizza" attachment.  This item fits on top of an existing Weber kettle style grill and allows you to get your grill over 700 degrees which is ideal for pizza.  I have used this a  few times with some great success and was looking forward to trying it again.    I have been reading many posts about using 00 style flour and how it really only works best when you can get your heat source over 700 degrees so while I could have used a 100% "00" flour pizza I still decided to do a 50-50 blend with bread flour.  If you don't have any "00" flour you can use 100% bread flour or another low protein flour.  The "00" flour does require less water so if you use it make sure to watch your hydration.  I suggest you add 50% of the water in the recipe before adding more and adjust as needed.

For the Pastrami pizza I used a simple fresh tomato sauce consisting of 1 can of diced tomatoes with red peppers, salt, freshly ground pepper, oregano, basil, 1/2 of a lemon and a dash of red wine vinegar. I also used fresh mozzarella along with some Munster cheese and Pastrami for the topping.

For the Pulled Pork pizza I used my home-made barbecue sauce along with fresh mozzarella.

I adapted a recipe from Peter Reinhart's Artisan Baking Everyday for the basic dough.  I have made this recipe several times and it is very simple and comes out great.

If you want to make this in your oven you certainly get great results as well.

I have tried the method suggested by  Steve B. at http://www.breadcetera.com where he suggested to put your pizza stone on the highest shelf of your oven and set your oven to broil.  The purpose of this is to get as much heat as possible to be retained by the stone.  I have to say it worked perfectly in the past for me so give it a try!

If you don't have the Kettle Pizza attachment for your grill you can still put a pizza stone on your grill and end up with a successful pizza.  The biggest issue is trying to get the desired char effect on the crust.

I have to say both pizzas came out great and I would definitely try both of these combinations again.  Maybe next time I would put some carmelized onions on the Pulled Pork version.

Ingredients

340 grams, 12 ounces Italian Style (00) Flour

340 grams, 12 ounces Bread Flour

14 grams, .5 ounces, or 2 teaspoons salt (sea salt or table salt)

3 grams, .11 ounces or 1 teaspoon instant yeast

28.5 grams, 1 ounce or 2 tablespoons sugar

428 grams, 17 ounces water (90 degrees)  (I suggest you decrease this amount if using "00" flour)

28.5 grams, 1 ounce or 2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

Combine all the ingredients in your mixing bowl and mix on the lowest speed possible for 1 minute.  The dough should be rough and a little sticky.  Let it rest for 5 minutes so the flour gets fully hydrated.

Knead the dough on medium low-speed (or by hand) for 2 to 3 minutes until the dough is smoother.  Next put some olive oil on your work surface and your hands and transfer the dough to your work area.  Do a stretch and fold and form the dough into a ball.  Divide the dough into 5 pieces weighing about 8 ounces each and form into balls.  Spray the inside of a mini plastic storage bag with oil and seal each dough ball in the bags.  Put them in your refrigerator overnight or up to 4 days.  You can freeze them also for several months if desired.

About 90 minutes before you are ready to bake your pizzas take how many dough balls you plan on using out of the fridge and put them on your lightly oiled work surface.  Stretch the dough balls and reshape them into a tight ball.  Cover the dough balls with either plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray or a clean lint free kitchen towel sprayed with some water and let them rest until you are ready to bake.

One hour before you are ready to bake pre-heat your oven or grill  to the highest temperature and put your pizza stone on the highest shelf possible in your oven.

Prepare your favorite sauce and get your cheese and toppings ready.  Remember, that more is less.  Don't use too much cheese or sauce or you will end up with a soggy mess.

Put some bench flour in a bowl and dip each dough ball in the flour as well as your hands.  Flatten the ball of dough on the work surface with your hands first and if desired either use a rolling-pin or pick the dough ball up and using both hands start stretching it out using your thumbs and the back of your knuckles.   Your thumbs should actually be doing all the stretching and not your knuckles.  you want dough to be fairly thin, but not too thin or it will end up ripping.

If cooking on the Kettle Grill set-up be sure to have your pizzas ready to go as you want to get your additional pizzas in as soon as possible after the first one is done.  In order to get the heat so high you must use a bed of coals with wood chunks or small logs and you want to cook your pizza before the temperature gets too low.

If using your oven, turn your oven on broil 10 minutes before you are ready to bake your pizza and get the stone as hot as possible.  Assemble your pie and brush some olive oil on the crust if desired.  You can either sprinkle corn meal or flour on your bakers peel and place the pizza on your peel before putting the topping on it. Alternatively you can put your pizza dough on a piece of parchment paper and slide the peel underneath when ready to put in the oven.  The worse thing that can happen is for your dough to get stuck on your peel and make a mess in your oven, not to mention ruin all your good efforts.

Make sure you turn the oven off broil before you put the pie inside and turn it back to your highest setting.  Let the pizza cook until the crust is blistering and the bottom is nice and brown.

If using the Kettle Grill attachment, you want to bake the pizza turning it a couple of times with your peel until the bottom and top crust is nice and charred.

I hope you give this recipe a try yourselves.  It is actually fun to make and relatively easy.

Feel free to visit my website at www.mookielovesbread.wordpress.com for some of my older posts or search the TFL site.

Pastrami Pizza

Comments

Franko's picture
Franko

Mm-Mm, pulled pork pizza! I've made it a few times myself and it's always been a winner. Yours looks terrific Ian, nice pie! Planning on making some pastrami soon so I'll have to earmark some to save for pizza. Thanks for the idea.

Franko

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

my pastrami cure recipe but so far no luck in finding it anywhere.  It has to be in a box in the garage somewhere.  Ian originally asked for it.  Would you mind sharing your's? 

Franko's picture
Franko

I'm happy to direct you to [Eric Hanner's recipe for pastrami] da-man. This is the one that really got me going down the charcuterie path a little over a year ago. It's a great recipe because Eric includes a quick/easy method for making it as well as a scratch procedure. Please note Eric's word of caution about not leaving out the pink salt. I'm sure you already know this but it needs to be emphasized again, regardless. Enjoy!

Franko

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

My favorite to cook with.  My old cure was a strange purple one from a Jewish Deli in NY that has now sadly closed.  It was was such a cool color.  It took about a month to cure the brisket and 6 weeks for best flavor.  Lots of coriander in it too.  Wish I could remember it all.

Thanks for directions to Eric's cure!

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi dabrownman,

Pink salt, or curing salt, has nitrite in it whereas the Himalayan pink is regular salt (sodium chloride). You need a proper curing salt in order stay food safe as the nitrite will prevent certain bacteria from growing, particularly those that cause botulism. You should be able to find some at an outdoor/hunting store or a sausage supply company. Insta Cure #1 is a fairly common brand name for this product to look for. Better to play it safe than take a chance when it comes to food poisoning.

Franko

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Franko!

I am dying to make my own pastrami.  I'm sure when you add some of your homemade pastrami it will be awesome.

Regards

Ian

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Ski resorts have conditioned me to fear pulled pork.

I just have to see the words "pulled pork" and I hide my wallet.

Vail Resorts. Pulled Pork Sandwich. Coleslaw. $31.

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Pastrami pizza sounds tasty. How would it work with Russian dressing, sauerkraut, and Swiss cheese? Reuben pizza!

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Mozzarella di bufala is one of the foods that shows up on my "Most Overrated Foods of All Time" list.

No flavour has.

Give me the cheap salty shredded mozz from Costco and I'm good to go!

My foodie elitism is dying a slow death as I gracelessly age.

Before I know it, I'll be back to corn dogs, mustard, and Ore-Ida French fries.

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Really beautiful pizza though!

This kettle pizza thingy has potential too.

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Thomas.

I am not a skier, but I have heard of the exhorbitant prices for food at some of the resorts.  I once paid around $45 in the Bahamas at a country club for 2 hot dogs and a can of soda!

I have to disagree with you about the fresh Moz.  If you have a good fresh cheese it is night and day better than any dry store bought version.  I do use the cheaper store bought version when I want a more traditional NY pizza but there is nothing like some fresh heirloom ripe tomatoes, olive oil and/or balsamic vinegar, basil and fresh mozarella or better yet buffalo mozarella.

What's wrong with corn dogs by the way :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

actually shocked, that Mr Chacon a true  southern Frenchman, would not like anything French Fried like French Fries and French Fried Corn Dogs. Oh Mon Dieu! Ce qui est le monde en venir :-) You have to try a home made smoked brats corn dog fried in duck fat! That is worth $20 - well not really since it only costs about a buck to make if you have the duck fat. Véritable paradis sur Terre

We used to fly over fresh Buffalo Mozz fromItalyevery week into Ohare to sell to the localChicagochefs and other food service distributors. Could never understand why folks would and rather pay so way much more for so little in additional flavor and not make fresh cows mozz instead. They didn't care though and we didn't mind lightening the load in their pockets for them. It must have been horrible having all that money potentially burning a hole in their pockets :-)

isand66's picture
isand66

Every once in a while I can find some buffalo mozz at Costco or Sam's Club and I do have to say there is noticeable difference.  The Buffalo is much creamier and melts in your mouth.  Every once in a while it is worth the extra price if you can find it.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

is due to the extremely high fat content of water buffalo milk - about twice as much with about half the cholesterol and water as cow's milk.   Protein is higher too but saturated fat is about twice as high as cow's milk though.   Nothing like it really.  It really begins to shine in hard aged cheeses - try them some time - for a really expensive treat!  The difference is less in fresh cheese and yogurt but it is still quite noticeable.   You can get by with putting less of Buffalo Mozz on pizza than Cow's Mozz too making it more reasonable cost wise. 

Since we flew it in from Italy our price was about 3 times higher than Costco's or Sam's.  They both have such huge volume that they load it into refrigerated containers and put it on fast ships so that it hits their East Coast warehouses after clearing customs in 8 days or less.  Almost half the shelf life is gone but they can really move it fast at much lower prices - which makes it reasonable to buy and more easily justified.   Our volume was tiny in comparison.  We sold to high end restaurants in the surrounding Chicago area who would pay to get it fresh and then sold it for 3 times more than they paid us for it.

Now there are WB herds in the USA too and this source is cheaper and growing.  Some day we will be able to get hard and or aged buffalo cheese made in the USA.  Buffalo brie is tough to beat ..... I think I would rather raise goats due to high cost of feed and going up in a huge way - so buy your Buffalo Mozz now and freeze it :-)

isand66's picture
isand66

There is actually a buffalo herd out in Calverton, Long Island about 20 minutes from where I live.  I have driven past them and they were featured on a food TV show recently.  There is a bar in the hamptons that cooks Buffalo steaks and burgers from the herd.  Not sure if they are making any cheese though.

I'm only able to find the good stuff once in a while at Costco.  Not a bad idea to freeze it.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

attachment works great.  Nice looking pies!   Love the dark crust too.  I used to rotate the pie half way through the bake to get an even bake all around but stopped doing so since some like it dark like me,  some like it light (the opposite side) and some are in the middle (90 degrees to both).   By not rotating you get all 3 on the same pie and everyone is happy!

Using the home made can smoker to make some smoked; chicken, chicken sausage and chorizo ettouffee today.  Smoked Gumbo will have to wait :-)

Scored another brand new, never used bread machine this morning at Goodwill.   This time a Breadman bought for a buck on dollar Thursday's.  I was really suprised it was still there even after checking it out last night right before they closed.  They wanted $12.99 for it originally but it has been half price all week and I was sure someone would buy it for $6.49.  Also got another nice round bread basket for 50 cents too.  Odd these two things were so close in price in the end.  Still haven't managed to get a 12" stone for the mini oven as they continue to disappear before dollar Thursdays. Two disappeared this week alone :-(

Instead of giving the bread machine as usual to the help some of the the mentally and physically handicapped older kids that my wife has worked with and trained over the last 35 years to help them get jobs and allowing them to live more independent lives (and bake their own bread), this one is going to a Wounded Warrior I recently met who used to make bread but is now unable to do so.    We can hrlp fix that for a buck - a very nice return on the minimal investment.

Once again nice pizza!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks for the compliment DA.

Your upcoming dinner sounds pretty awesome.  Let me know how it comes out.

I couldn't figure out why you would buy a bread maker, but after finishing your reply I am thrilled to read about the real reason behind it.  You have a big heart DA and if anyone deserves all of our help it would be a Wounded Warrior.  I had the privalege a few years ago to visit Walter Reed with a pro baseball player who was doing a good will visit.  He was so moved by the wounded recovering veterans that he donated over 100 tickets to that nights game and offered to arrange transportation to the game.  I was so moved that I was literally speachless afer seeing all of the suffering that was caused in the line of duty to keep everyday Americans safe.  It certainly puts things in perspective.

I hope your donation helps brighten the life of a most deserving hero.

Regards,
Ian