The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Variations on a theme

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Variations on a theme

If you haven't tried David Snyder's SF Sourdough bread technique yet, you really should.  It is a crusty, tasty bread that is very forgiving to make.  I have made it a number of times, and have been making some small adjustments to fit my schedule and my tastes.  In the last two weeks, I baked it twice and thought I would share some photos.

I like adding a small amount of whole spelt flour (about 10%) because of the flavor it imparts.  This loaf used David's 50% hydration starter that I made with 5% spelt in place of the rye that he lists.  I also wanted to try to shape it into a fendu, which I have never tried before.  The loaf was shaped and retarded overnight (about 18 hours) directly in a floured banneton.  In the morning it was proofed an hour at 85˚F and two additional hours at room temperature, about 68˚.  The results were quite good.

Sorry, I don't have a crumb picture because I took the bread for a dinner party and didn't have a chance to take one.  There is a very strong sour flavor to this bread, and it has a crispy-chewy crust and creamy crumb.

I baked a second set of batards the following week.  Again I used 10% whole spelt, but instead of the 50% hydration starter, I used a 75% hydration starter to try to reduce the acidity.  There have been some discussions on whether the starter hydration affects acidity recently, and I wanted to see what happens to my loaves.

The technique was mostly the same.  The main difference was that I proofed the loaf in linen lined baskets for 90 minutes after shaping and then retarded them overnight.  In the morning I finished proofing at 85˚ for an hour, then another 45 minutes at room temperature.  To my taste, the second bake (75%H starter) seemed less tart than the first (50%H starter), but of course it is highly subjective.  Both bakes gain acidity after sitting for a day or two.

Thanks again David for a great bread formula.

-Brad

Comments

hanseata's picture
hanseata

And that is one of my favorites, too.

Karin

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Thanks, Karin

varda's picture
varda

Wonderful bubbly crust.   I'm not familiar with fendu shaping.   Could you say more about how you did it?    -Varda

 

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Thanks Varda.  This is really the first time my crust was so blistery.  Comparing photos of the two loaves, the one that was proofed without the linen liners appears much more so, and I wonder if the moisture content in the surface is a factor. 

Here is a video showing how to make a fendu: http://www.archivesaudiovisuelles.fr/FR/_video.asp?id=1690&ress=5424&video=120367&format=68#22063 (if like me you don't speak French, the action speaks for itself).  Basically, I shaped a boule, then floured the top fairly heavily and used a rolling pin down the center of the loaf.  The excess flour is brushed off and the two halves formed are rolled together, then placed in the banneton top down.  Hamelman gives a decent description in the shaping section of "Bread".  Give it a try!

BTW, the loaf is not scored before baking.

-Brad

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Not really but it sounds good, I would have thought from the pictures that David himself baked those beautiful loaves!.  You do his formula and method justice.   I saw a baker in Tuscany making Saltless Fendus with a piece of dowel the other day on TV.  You found a nice way to shape bread that is a little different than the norm... my kind of bread :-)  Gad you made one.

Very nice baking indeed!  

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Thanks dabrownman.  I used a round shape because I don't have an oblong basket that can hold 2 lb of dough.  I think oblong is a more traditional shape for the fendu, but this worked ok.

-Brad

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'm so glad you are enjoying this formula!

David

breadforfun's picture
breadforfun

Not having grown up in San Francisco, I am not familiar with the original taste that you are trying to duplicate.  But we enjoy these breads on their own, and they stand up to any of the artisan breads available here.

-Brad