The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Too bubbly dough and flatness of loaf?

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ouhrabko's picture
ouhrabko

Too bubbly dough and flatness of loaf?

Hello,  i would like ask you for advice. 

i ´m making too flat loaves.  I´ve handled how to make half rye sourdough caraway seed bread and i wanted tray got some white, french, sourdough bread.   But, it doesn´t workinkg for me. 

I have well developed gluten, i have enough of steam in oven - most problematic part is geting loaf to baking sheet - the dough is to soft and get flat and don´t get rise up.  Easy solution is - high hydration. But it´s happend, when i folowed Rainhart´s formula for  miche very strictly.  

 

When i´m watching videos about shaping, i see difrent structure of my dough, than at videos - mine is very bubbly.   Should i have to strong starter (it´s abou three month old and wery vivid).   if I use a smaller proportion of starter, it will help?

 

thanks for reaction

.

All at Sea's picture
All at Sea

... toil and trouble!

Alas, Ouhrabko, it sounds as if your dough is overproofed. Those bubbles are very likely the sign of too long spent in fermentation.

Does your dough also become wetter and stickier as you wait to put it in the oven? That's another sign of too long spent in fermentation. The wild yeast is running out of food, so attacks the gluten and begins to feed off that. End result - gluten structure spoiled and flatter bread with dense crumb.

If so, then you need to do one of two things - or both:

1. Get the dough ready to bake sooner. Cut down the first rise - called bulk fermentation.

After shaping for the final proof, also keep a very keen eye on the dough's behaviour. Do the poke test every twenty minutes. (Flour your fingers and press two fingers gently but firmly into the dough to leave an indent. If the indent slowly fills back in again, to about half-way, your dough is ready to bake. If it springs straight back, it needs a little longer to rise; if the indent just stays there - no filling in - you've overproofed. But throw the dough in the oven quick as you can anyway, and pray!)

Your starter sounds wonderful, so hooray and congratulations! :0) And yes, you can use a little less of it to give you a slower fermentation. But whether you use the same amount or less, you still have to carefully watch your dough and move it on to the next stage in the process when it is ready - don't leave it lying around rising, for too long.

Let us know how you get on - and good luck!

All at Sea

PeterinVT's picture
PeterinVT

Another factor could be temp and getting the dough to over ferment in a short period of time.  You may want to do a "pull and fold" about halfway through the final to degass it and align the dough to give it a bit  more strength.   I would try reducing the amount of starter, keeping the dough and room temp between 70 and 80 and reducing the hydration to 65%.
You mention baking on a sheet.  One method that works for me is to to the final rise on parchment on the back side of a baking sheet and then transferring it on to a pizza stone using the sheet pan like a pizza peel.   You'll get a better oven spring and won't deflate the dough in the transfer process.    Are you making any cuts into the dough before baking?  That may also help your final product.

Ford's picture
Ford

I agree with "all at sea".  Do not go by time, but learn to judge for yourself when the dough is ready.

Gently poke the dough with two fingers held together.  If the indentation springs back quickly, the dough is not ready.  If the indentation remains for several seconds, it is ready.

Pay close attention to the shaping of the loaves to develope tension in the surface of the loaf.

If necessary, add more flour to make a less slack dough until you get the technique right.  This will make a heavier loaf, but it may be the best solution for now.

Ford

ouhrabko's picture
ouhrabko

thanks a lot - i´m going to poke  dough. 

All at Sea's picture
All at Sea

... though apart from us, I think it best you keep that nugget of information to yourself. (Oh the joys of language!)

Let us know how you get on, we're rooting for ye!

All at Sea

ouhrabko's picture
ouhrabko

The reason was really overproofed first phase.  Next two loaves are  good.  Thanx a lot!

 I´m just curious, if  the starter will change his* character again at some next month...

 

 

*sorry in my native language starter is a masculinum and  my starter is not it! ;-)