The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

June Baking; restricted

ananda's picture
ananda

June Baking; restricted


Given my flour delivery was put back a week, and the weather has done nothing except rain here in the UK, seemingly incessantly, and forever, my baking schedule has been somewhat interfered with.

So, here are a few loaves I've baked recently.   The Gilchesters' loaves were made today, and I will repeat again tomorrow as I dive into a dissertation on UK Organic Wheat, and prepare for a trip to Dunbar in Southern Scotland to introduce a training programme at a great local Bakery Co-operative


Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

 

Rye Sour build:

Day/Date

Time

Stock

D Rye

Water

TOTAL

Temp °C

Weds 13th June

20:00

40

300

500

840

30

Saturday 16th June

18:30

840

450

750

2040

30

 

Final Paste:

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

750

Water

50

1250

TOTAL

80

2000

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

15

375

Red Rye Malt

5

125

Blackstrap Molasses

6

150

Crushed Coriander Seeds

1

25

Boiling Water

35

875

TOTAL

62

1550

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

2000

“Scald” [from 1b]

62

1550

TOTAL

142

3550

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

142

3550

Shipton Organic Light Rye Flour [997]

50

1250

Salt

1.2

30

TOTAL

193.2

4830

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

50 [+ 50 type997]

-

FACTOR

-

25

 

 

 

Method:

    • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   crush the coriander and add it to the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
    • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 4 hours @ 35°C.
    • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
    • Bulk proof for 2 hours with DDT at 28°C.
    • Scale and divide into 5.   Shape and drop into 5 Sandwich Pans, prepared with lining of shortening and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off and top with freshly crushed Coriander seeds, then apply lids.
    • Final proof for 2 hours at 28°C, then bake.
    • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pans, apply steam, after 10 minutes turn the oven down to 110°C, and move to Convection setting.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for 6 hours.
    • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

 This is a video demonstrating how best to scale these loaves, and shape them for the pans.   In years gone by at Village Bakery, a team of 2 bakers would produce 2 x 150kg batches of this type of Rye paste and scale it off in this way.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xf36f0Fw0_E&feature=youtu.be

 Roasted Brazil Nut and Prune Bread

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Biga

 

 

Carrs “Special CC” Flour

20

300

Water

12

180

Fresh Yeast

0.2

3

TOTAL

32.2

483

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Biga [from 1]

32.2

483

Carrs “Special CC”Flour

55

825

Marriage’s Organic Strong Wholemeal

25

375

Butter

5

75

Salt

1.67

25

Fresh Yeast

1.33

20

Water

56

840

Soft Prunes

12.5

180

Brazil Nuts - toasted and chopped

12.5

180

TOTAL

200.2

3003

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

% overall hydration

68

-

% wholegrain flour

25

-

FACTOR

-

15

 

Method:

    • Prepare the Biga the night before.
    • Combine all the ingredients in the mixer except the fruit and nuts.   Mix on first speed until clear, scraping down as needed.   Mix for 6 minutes on second speed with the hook attachment.   Rest the dough for 20 minutes then add the fruit and nuts and mix to clear using a Scotch cutter.   DDT 28°C.
    • Bulk Ferment 1½ hours.
    • Scale and divide into 3 x 1kg pieces; mould round.   Rest 15 minutes then shape as bloomers.   Glaze with beaten egg.
    • Final proof 1½ hours.
    • Score the tops of the loaves with 4 diagonal cuts and bake in a pre-heated electric oven at 170°C with convection for 55 minutes.
    • Cool on wires.

Both the Borodinsky and the Toasted Brazil Nut and Prune Breads were lovely.   My apologies, the photographs don't really tell the best story.   It seems to be permanently dark in our house at the moment...and it was our longest day very recently too!!

 

 Gilchesters’ Miche

Makes 2 loaves @ 1350g

Levain build:

Day

Time

Stock Levain

White Flour

Water

Total

Temp °C

 Saturday 23rd June

21:30

40

400

240

680

18

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Wheat Levain

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

25

400

Water

15

240

TOTAL

40

640

 

 

 

2. Final Dough

 

 

Wheat Levain [from above]

40

640

Gilchesters’ Organic Farmhouse Flour

75

1200

Salt

1.6

24

Water

58

928

TOTAL

174.6

2792

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

25

-

% overall hydration

73

-

% wholegrain flour [approx 85% extraction]

75

-

FACTOR

-

16

 

Method:

    • Build leaven as schedule.
    • Mix Farmhouse flour and water for 3 minutes on first speed, then autolyse for 1 hour.   Add leaven to Autolyse and mix for 5 minutes on first speed.   Add the salt and mix a further 4 – 7 minutes on first speed.   Scrape down the bowl as necessary.   DDT 24°C.
    • Bulk proof 3 hours; S&F after 1 and 2 hours.
    • Scale, divide and mould round.   Rest 15 minutes, covered, and prepare the bannetons.   Re-mould dough pieces and place upside down in bannetons.
    • Final proof 2 – 3 hours.
    • Score top with an “A” and bake in a pre-heated electric oven at 250°C with steam for 10 minutes.   Switch to convection, drop the heat to 200°C and bake a further 30 minutes.   Drop the heat to 160°C and bake out 12 - 15 minutes.
    • Cool on wires.

Crumb shots!
DSCF3837DSCF3838DSCF3839

This all leaves me with a good bit of baking to do next week as the Alnwick Farmers' Market takes place on Friday.   After that, it's Hexham on Saturday week.

The Summer looks busy; Alnwick Farmers' Market end of July; Powburn Show early August, more on this soon; holiday on Paxos for 2 weeks; August Farmers' Market; Bank Holiday party for friend's 50th.   Then in September it's Alnwick Food Festival, where I'm doing a presentation and taking a stall along with my colleague Ann from Doughworks [ http://www.doughworks.co.uk/ ]

Happy Baking everybody!

Andy

Comments

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Andy,

Your summer does indeed look busy.  Odd to think of you dealing with continual rain while we are experiencing the opposite here.  Our temps. all week and for the next are to be in the upper 90°s F/ 30°s C.  I can almost bake my breads on our cement drive!  As it  is I bought a large toaster oven and am now baking in our garage so I don't have to deal with a hot oven in my house too!  I would gladly take a week of your rain for a week of our heat.  Think we can swing that????

Lovely breads and thanks for the shaping video.  I love the feel of wet rye dough and how easily it can be shaped if one knows the trick of wet hands :-)  That one I learned from Mini when I made her rye bread and it is one trick that I haven't forgotten.

The prune bread looks like one that my daughter would enjoy.  She loves fruit in breads but I know I will have to increase the % of prunes because she likes a lot of fruit!!!!  It will be added to my 'to bake' list.

Take Care and thanks for the post and new formula to try out.

Janet

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Janet,

Alison and I are very much "hothouse flowers", so we'd love to have some of your temperatures; yes please to a swap!

Busy Summer, but I'll be getting help from Codruta to do the Powburn Show now.   Much to look forward to in that week for sure.

I can't add any more fruit/nuts to the Toasted Brazil Nut and Prune Bread.   I already charge £5.00 for an 800g loaf.   Fruit and nuts cost me £10.00 per kg, so it's a commercial non-starter unfortunately.

I can't begin to think how many thousands of loaves I've scaled using the method shown in the video!

Many thanks for your great comments

Very best wishes

Andy

mwilson's picture
mwilson

The blooming rain yes! I sympathise. Although it's not been so bad down here in Surrey. Actually had some sunny days/half days! Wednesday was a scorcher!

Great work as always Andy. The roasted brazil nut and prune bread is my favourite. Although I make my biga's much stiffer usually 40-50%. Might give this one a go.

Thanks for sharing.

Michael

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Michael,

Great to hear from you, many thanks for your kind words.

Regarding the use of a stiffer biga, you will know that there is no problem in adjusting this formula for that, then adding more water in the final dough.   I'm sure a very stiff biga would work just fine.

I need good weather later this week for sure!

All good wishes

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Andy.  Will have to make note of your reducing baking temperatures as the bake pro cedes.  Like the prunes and Brazil nuts combination  The crust on the Gilchesters’  Miche is about as good as it can get!

Sorry about the rain.  We haven't had any in so long, with 110 F Days, I'm not sure water is wet anymore.

Bake on my friend!

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi dabrownman,

Well it's easier to use reducing temperatures with a thermostatically controlled electric oven than it is with my wood-fired oven.   But I'm not complaining ; the brick oven allows me to bake more, and brings real authenticity to what I do too.

So, more wood-fired baking on Wednesday and Thursday ready for Friday's Market this week

Many thanks for your kind words, as always

Best wishes

Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Rain would never dampen your bakin instincts, Andy! Lovely bakes, as usual, and a busy summer ahead!

Truly, brazil nuts and prunes are a harmonious couple. Thanks for the video on handling rye. 

Khalid

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Khalid,

you're right that there is nothing allowed to get in the way of me baking bread!

I'm glad the video is of use, and that we both agree on the prune and brazil nut combination; it's a top formula which is loosely based on Hamelman's Hazelnut & Prune, but using Biga in place of Levain!   No added sugar, of course!

Very best wishes

Andy

Franko's picture
Franko

Hi Andy,
We've had our fair share of the wet stuff this month as well, but have glorious sunshine and clear skies on the Island today.
Good to see your Borodinsky loaf again and enjoyed your scaling and shaping video as well, very nicely done!
The prune and brazil nut loaf sounds lovely. I've yet to use brazil nuts in a bread but have wondered how their flavour would come through in a baked loaf. It sounds like they do very well, so I'll have to give them a try in a future bake. Thanks for the inspiration and sharing your recipe. All the best with your upcoming projects and vacation, hoping July and August deliver lots of warm sunny days for you.
Cheers,
Franko

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Franko,

Well you will know only too well about the cost implications of including nuts in bread formulae.   However, I always get great feedback about these loaves, which I've made with figs, prunes and apricots, and with brazil, almond and hazelnuts.   No one questions the price, and they all love the flavours too.

I think with the Brazil nuts, chopping them the right size once they are toasted is a good trick.   Not too small to loose them, but not too big that there appear to be insufficient pieces throughout the crumb.   Maybe they are my favourite nut?

Many thanks for all your very generous words; it's always great to hear from you

Very best wishes

Andy

wally's picture
wally

Those just look so good Andy!  They're now at the top of my to-do bake list.

Best,

Larry

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Larry,

I dug this pdf out for you to look over:

http://www.virginia.edu/ien/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Process_RanZheng2012_LocalFlours.pdf

If you want to make the Miche as close as possible to my formulae, then you need to source High Extraction flour [85% is what I use] from a local mill.   Lionel Poilane did this.   Obviously you adjust the hydration accordingly, but the MacGuire formula in Hamelman's book is just that bit wet for me to use.   The Gilchesters' flour is very weak, and there is no way it would cope with that level of water, even though it is quite thirsty.

I really hope you do make this Miche, Larry; I'm already looking forward to seeing your post on it!

Very good to hear from you, and thank you for your generous words

Very best wishes to you

Andy

wally's picture
wally

Interesting article in the PDF you included for me.

Ruralidle's picture
Ruralidle

Hi Andy

Lovely looking bread as always!  It has been so wet down here that I haven't fired the wfo up for weeks :( .  Good luck with your Farmers' Markets and shows - as well as with the MSc!

Richard

 

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Richard,

Yes wet everywhere in the UK recently, it would seem.

Anyway, today I went to Sunny Dunbar...and the sun shone all day long.   I had back-to-back meetings, along with product development work.   One meeting was about using local flour.   So I took along one of the Gilchesters' Miche I made yesterday.   So I'm using my reply post here to you to point out that I have now added shots of the crumb of the bread to my original post.   Evidence of properly fermented bread, I suggest.

My wood-fired oven gets a double outing this week; Wednesday and Thursday.

Great to hear from you, and many thanks for you always generous words

Very best wishes

Andy

wassisname's picture
wassisname

Beautiful loaves, Andy. The crumb on the miche is simply inspiring! Thanks as always for sharing and I hope your summer just keeps getting busier :)

Marcus

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Marcus,
I had challenging meetings for much of Monday. The Miche provided great evidence on a number of levels for all these meetings; I am so glad I took this loaf along for this particular visit.
I am very happy it has inspired you too; working with local flour is challenging; but very rewarding once the recipe and process are perfected.
Very best wishes; it's great to hear from you
Andy

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

than preparing some excellent bread when the weather is awful? Do you remember when last summer I complained of the scottish weather migrated to italy? Well, things seem to have returned to the usual state of affairs: clouds and cold where they belong:-) although I'm very sorry that you can't get some nice sun.

Your Borodinsky is great as usual and seeing in the video that I did the right thing all along is conforting! Bread with nuts and dried fruits is a real luxury, I'm already salivating.

Best wishes, dear friend.

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Nico,
Maybe Alison and I should move South???! We love the sun; the heat. But, in Northumberland! I guess we should not expect it; but does it really have to rain so much?

You are not allowed to add sugar to the fruit and nut loaf; ok?
Actually, the Miches in the post are my favourite, but those fruit and nut bloomers are always a hit with customers. A real luxury, as you rightly note.
Alison is expecting that we will enjoy 2 weeks of sun this Summer...in Paxos, Greece, in August! The UK is a write-off
Many thanks for your kind words.
Very best wishes to you
Andy